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Thin clients and windows home server RRS feed

  • General discussion

  • I have been looking into thin clients and blade pc's where the os is on the server instead of the desktop (vdi) virtual desktop infrastructure. so my question is will there be a similar solution on windows home server soon?

    HP Education Solutions -- Thin Client and Blade PCs
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3oQhjtNbN9M
    dell
    • Changed type kariya21Moderator Friday, January 1, 2010 11:58 PM not a technical question
    Tuesday, December 29, 2009 5:18 AM

All replies

  • Windows Home Server is a home server OS, not an application server, so I very strongly doubt it. What you're describing is a large enterprise solution...
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Tuesday, December 29, 2009 3:33 PM
    Moderator
  • yes right now it is....servers were once enterprise products only. Look at nvidia ion desktops and netbooks low cost low power computers and cloud computing. I feel it's only a matter of time before these cheap thin clients or nettops take over and people offer vdi over direct access. Microsoft has pushed the idea of software+services and the idea that not everything needs to be in the cloud most people will not configure "enterprise servers" but are paranoid about privacy.

    "Microsoft already has been testing a similar pay-as-you-go program for Windows, known as FlexGo, in a handful of developing countries since last May."
    dell
    Tuesday, December 29, 2009 5:53 PM
  • Late last year, Microsoft quietly announced a new server operating system called “Windows MultiPoint Server 2010” aimed at the educations market based on the Microsoft Research project MultiMouse. As it nears its release, the more I look at this product the more I see this as an ideal multiseat computing solution even for the home."

    "Unix enthusiasts might be quick to point out this type of computing actually originated on Unix long ago, it hasn’t reached the mainstream, yet, it solves a very common computing problem in the home environment – a limited number of computers and everyone who wants to use it at the same time.

    Granted the average cost of home PCs have been steadily declining in the past decade, the hidden cost of maintaining, running and eventually renewing a PC for every home user is an unnecessary burden for what might only be light web browsing and emails. Whilst thin-client solutions has worked well for the enterprise, the complexity doesn’t really make sense for a home."

    http://www.istartedsomething.com/20100115/windows-multipoint-server-multiseat-computing-solution-worthy-home/


    dell
    Thursday, January 14, 2010 3:45 PM
  • I now have 4 wyse thin clients v90 series.....I am now looking at ways to use thin clients with my whs box. Many people have low powered netbooks nettops and eepc's with small ssd drives and may want to do the same instead of relying on web apps and web storage. 
    dell
    Friday, March 12, 2010 12:18 PM
  • will terminal services break anything on windows home server? or should I try the wyse thin client software? or citrix xendesktop for vdi?
    dell
    Saturday, March 13, 2010 4:08 AM
  • I personally think you've got this whole thing backwards. Thin clients aren't the future of home computing. (They aren't the future of business computing either.) At home, I see grid computing and ubiquitous interfaces on any/all surfaces as the future, and not too far away, either. I think the technology is about 4-6 years from hitting the market (at the high end, of course, and certainly under a decade). In business, something similar but more focused is likely.

    But what you want to do isn't supported, and is an explicit violation of the EULA for Windows Home Server, which prohibits activating roles on your server which Microsoft hasn't activated by default, and which specifically mentions the Application Server role as not permitted. So I'm going to have to ask you to drop it.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Saturday, March 13, 2010 5:56 AM
    Moderator
  • I personally think you've got this whole thing backwards. Thin clients aren't the future of home computing. (They aren't the future of business computing either.) At home, I see grid computing and ubiquitous interfaces on any/all surfaces as the future, and not too far away, either. I think the technology is about 4-6 years from hitting the market (at the high end, of course, and certainly under a decade). In business, something similar but more focused is likely.

    But what you want to do isn't supported, and is an explicit violation of the EULA for Windows Home Server, which prohibits activating roles on your server which Microsoft hasn't activated by default, and which specifically mentions the Application Server role as not permitted. So I'm going to have to ask you to drop it.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)

    I think you have grid computing confused with cloud computing and the “three screens” vision from Microsoft. The issue then becomes data security, control, retention, archiving, recovery of data and GOVERNMENT/INDUSTRY compliance. If I can’t afford to pay one month will they simply cancel my subscription or access and delete my data?  

    If you have been following the hardware industry for the last 3+ years you would know people are looking for smaller cheaper and more power efficient computers. Go to best buy and look at the tiny HP computers or the mac mini (mac book air) (net books).

    In the Microsoft “three screens” vision one is a desktop with browser the other is a cell phone and the last is TV.

    "PC Is Just One of 'Three Screens,' Ballmer Says"

    http://www.pcworld.com/article/156641/pc_is_just_one_of_three_screens_ballmer_says.html

    I have not read the EULA but if it does in fact violate the EULA then I will have no choice but to try xen desktop or wyse software since installing software and add ins apparently does not violate the EULA.

    “Grids are a form of distributed computing whereby a “super virtual computer” is composed of many networked loosely coupled computers acting in concert to perform very large tasks. This technology has been applied to computationally intensive scientific, mathematical, and academic problems through volunteer computing, and it is used in commercial enterprises for such diverse applications as drug discovery, economic forecasting, seismic analysis, and back-office data processing in support of e-commerce and Web services.

     

    What distinguishes Grid computing from conventional high performance computing systems such as cluster computing is that Grids tend to be more loosely coupled, heterogeneous, and geographically dispersed. It is also true that while a Grid may be dedicated to a specialized application, a single Grid may be used for many different purposes. They are often constructed with the aid of general-purpose Grid software libraries called middleware.”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grid_computing


    dell
    Saturday, March 13, 2010 7:06 PM