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Multiple choice questions RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am taking the Sharepoint 2007 70-630 exam this Friday.

    One of the things I am wondering is, with the questions requiring more than one answer (Eg "select 2 options required to perform this task"), are these questions worth in marks the number of answers?

    Eg if 2 answers then there are 2 marks available. What if I get 1 answer incorrect?

    Thanks
    Tuesday, July 28, 2009 3:34 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

    This information is not made public by Microsoft. I am guessing that you still might get some points for getting part of it however I am not sure. Not all of the questions are weighted the same.

    Hope this helps.
    Eric
    • Proposed as answer by Eric Stauss Tuesday, July 28, 2009 4:00 PM
    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Thursday, January 7, 2010 9:32 PM
    Tuesday, July 28, 2009 3:44 PM
  • I've read elsewhere (and I think on Microsoft's site) that you get partial credit on multiple answer questions.  But, with questions like what you reference (select 2 options required to perform this task), one should trigger your memory for the other.
    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Thursday, January 7, 2010 9:32 PM
    Tuesday, July 28, 2009 5:13 PM
    Answerer
  • According to Microsoft Exam – FAQ's ----> "If a question specifies that you must choose multiple correct answers, you must choose the exact number of correct answers specified in the question in order to earn the credit for that item." 

    A. Here is some general information about exam scoring:

    • There is no penalty for guessing. If you choose an incorrect answer, you simply do not earn credit for that item. No points are deducted for incorrect answers.

    • If a question specifies that you must choose multiple correct answers, you must choose the exact number of correct answers specified in the question in order to earn the credit for that item.

    • Some questions on the exam might not be included in the calculation of your score. To gather data to update and improve the quality of Microsoft Certification exams, we need to present new content to candidates without counting the results toward their score.

    • All Microsoft exams are scaled such that the passing score is 700. The actual cut score (the number of items you need to answer correctly) is determined by a group of subject-matter experts. A common misperception is that you must answer 70 percent of the items correctly in order to pass the exam; however, the actual percentage varies from exam to exam and may be more or less than 70 percent, depending on the input provided by the subject-matter experts who helped us set the cut score. After you complete your exam, the points you earned are compared with the cut score to determine whether the result is pass or fail. Prometric's software generates the scaled score and bars shown on your score report from scoring information provided by Microsoft.

      Hope this this helpful.


    Rubel Khan - MY BLOG!
    If your question was truly answered, please mark it as Answered and Vote as helpful. Thank you in advance.
    • Proposed as answer by Rubel Khan Wednesday, July 29, 2009 1:21 AM
    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Thursday, January 7, 2010 9:32 PM
    Wednesday, July 29, 2009 1:21 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    This information is not made public by Microsoft. I am guessing that you still might get some points for getting part of it however I am not sure. Not all of the questions are weighted the same.

    Hope this helps.
    Eric
    • Proposed as answer by Eric Stauss Tuesday, July 28, 2009 4:00 PM
    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Thursday, January 7, 2010 9:32 PM
    Tuesday, July 28, 2009 3:44 PM
  • I've read elsewhere (and I think on Microsoft's site) that you get partial credit on multiple answer questions.  But, with questions like what you reference (select 2 options required to perform this task), one should trigger your memory for the other.
    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Thursday, January 7, 2010 9:32 PM
    Tuesday, July 28, 2009 5:13 PM
    Answerer
  • According to Microsoft Exam – FAQ's ----> "If a question specifies that you must choose multiple correct answers, you must choose the exact number of correct answers specified in the question in order to earn the credit for that item." 

    A. Here is some general information about exam scoring:

    • There is no penalty for guessing. If you choose an incorrect answer, you simply do not earn credit for that item. No points are deducted for incorrect answers.

    • If a question specifies that you must choose multiple correct answers, you must choose the exact number of correct answers specified in the question in order to earn the credit for that item.

    • Some questions on the exam might not be included in the calculation of your score. To gather data to update and improve the quality of Microsoft Certification exams, we need to present new content to candidates without counting the results toward their score.

    • All Microsoft exams are scaled such that the passing score is 700. The actual cut score (the number of items you need to answer correctly) is determined by a group of subject-matter experts. A common misperception is that you must answer 70 percent of the items correctly in order to pass the exam; however, the actual percentage varies from exam to exam and may be more or less than 70 percent, depending on the input provided by the subject-matter experts who helped us set the cut score. After you complete your exam, the points you earned are compared with the cut score to determine whether the result is pass or fail. Prometric's software generates the scaled score and bars shown on your score report from scoring information provided by Microsoft.

      Hope this this helpful.


    Rubel Khan - MY BLOG!
    If your question was truly answered, please mark it as Answered and Vote as helpful. Thank you in advance.
    • Proposed as answer by Rubel Khan Wednesday, July 29, 2009 1:21 AM
    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Thursday, January 7, 2010 9:32 PM
    Wednesday, July 29, 2009 1:21 AM