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Hyper V - Differences between using Windows 10 vs Windows Server

    Question

  • Hello All,

    So I am looking at heavily investing in Hyper V for my certification VMs but I am unsure which OS exactly would give me the most benefit.

    First off I get both Windows 10 Edu and Windows Server 2016 (All Editions) for free from university so cost is not an issue in this case.

    Now I will be running a couple of VMs on my custom built desktop, I have used Windows Server on this machine and it works fine with a little bit of work.

    My main question is this though, is there any major difference between Server or 10 Edu? does Server Management have any tools that can make hyper V better compared to 10 Hyper V?

    Thanks

    Tuesday, February 14, 2017 2:14 PM

Answers

  • Hi XDroidie.

    As far as I know, Windows Server Hyper-V should be more complete, since it provides you with features like Live Migration, RemoteFX and Replication.
    I suggest you to use the server VMs for your certification study and practice.

    Bye.


    Luigi Bruno
    MCP, MCTS, MOS, MTA

    Tuesday, February 14, 2017 9:54 PM
  • Hi,

    You can just use Windows 10 on your desktop, set up Windows server VMs and enable nested virtualization. Then, you can set up Hyper-V on the virtual machine and run a VM in a VM. You can even deploy a Hyper-V Failover cluster using S2D (create many virtual disks and assign it to nodes) or iSCSI (set up a dedicated virtual machine with iSCSI Target) - all on a single physical box.

    Saturday, February 18, 2017 3:32 PM

All replies

  • Hi XDroidie.

    As far as I know, Windows Server Hyper-V should be more complete, since it provides you with features like Live Migration, RemoteFX and Replication.
    I suggest you to use the server VMs for your certification study and practice.

    Bye.


    Luigi Bruno
    MCP, MCTS, MOS, MTA

    Tuesday, February 14, 2017 9:54 PM
  • Hi,

    You can just use Windows 10 on your desktop, set up Windows server VMs and enable nested virtualization. Then, you can set up Hyper-V on the virtual machine and run a VM in a VM. You can even deploy a Hyper-V Failover cluster using S2D (create many virtual disks and assign it to nodes) or iSCSI (set up a dedicated virtual machine with iSCSI Target) - all on a single physical box.

    Saturday, February 18, 2017 3:32 PM