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Does WHS-RC1 now work with non-NTFS drives? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I haven't seen this mentioned anywhere but does the latest version (RC1) work with non-NTFS drives.  IMHO this will be a major issue for lots of unsophisticated users who have no idea of the difference between FAT, FAT32 and NTFS.  CTP said that one of my PCs did not have any NTFS drives when both hard drives in the PC were NTFS however they may have been converted from FAT32 and perhaps WHS didn't like that as converted drives apparently are not "true" NTFS drives.

    Lots of the target market for WHS will have older PCs that may have FAT32 drives.

    Thursday, June 14, 2007 9:05 PM

Answers

  • No.  In order for a hard drive on a home computer to be backed up - it has to be formatted with NTFS.

     

    Most machines that shipped with Windows XP over the last 2-3 years were formatted with NTFS and all Windows Vista machines are formatted with NTFS.

    Thursday, June 14, 2007 9:08 PM

All replies

  • No.  In order for a hard drive on a home computer to be backed up - it has to be formatted with NTFS.

     

    Most machines that shipped with Windows XP over the last 2-3 years were formatted with NTFS and all Windows Vista machines are formatted with NTFS.

    Thursday, June 14, 2007 9:08 PM
  • What about a hard drive that was converted to NTFS using the MS convert function? 

    I know that most PCs in the last few years used NTFS, but the target user of WHS likely has several PCs in their house - I would bet that in many instances some of these PCs will be 4+ years old and the users won't understand the difference between NTFS/FAT32.

    Thursday, June 14, 2007 10:19 PM
  • I had to convert one of my systems with MS convert and WHS recognized it without any problems and the back-ups worked great.

     

     

    Scott.

     

    Thursday, June 14, 2007 11:49 PM
  • If it is NTFS it is good to go, it does not matter much how you get there.

     

    Bob

    Friday, June 15, 2007 2:54 AM
  • we do support disks that have been converted from FAT to NTFS - one thing to note (you wont see this anywhere, but it's cool trivia ) is that a typical NTFS volume will use 4k clusters and a FAT conversion uses 512bytes.  Our backup server handles this fine but you'll get better compression from it if all your computers use the same cluster size.

     

    -CG

     

    Friday, June 15, 2007 2:57 AM