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How to move the Default website from port 80 to something else? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I haven't seen a proper answer to this as yet.

    How can I move the default website from port 80 without breaking anything in WHS?

    I want to run a public facing website from HomeServer.  I could set up port forwarding under IPv4 from my router.  However, hardware vendors refuse to support port forwarding for IPv6.  This means, I MUST move the default website to another port, so I can have a proper public facing website.

    Monday, July 11, 2011 4:41 AM

Answers

  • What functions? The connector installation process runs off the default web site, as does quite a bit else. You can find out specifically by looking at the web applications defined on the site, but moving the site off port 80 won't work, as I've already said.

    If you have a separate domain for your alternate web site, you could perhaps use host headers (supported by IIS) to set up a separate site bound only to that URL.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by midspace Friday, July 29, 2011 8:57 AM
    Tuesday, July 12, 2011 1:27 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Without breaking anything? You can't. The default web site supports multiple functions, none of which are likely to work if you move them off of port 80.

    As for running a "public facing web site", you should review the license you agreed to when you installed WHS, to make sure the use you intend isn't a violation of that license. (For example, running a business web site from your home server is likely to violate the license.) This is available by opening the Dashboard, clicking the small arrow nest to "Help", selecting "About Windows ..." and clicking on the link to the software license terms.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Monday, July 11, 2011 12:53 PM
    Moderator
  • Without breaking anything? You can't. The default web site supports multiple functions, none of which are likely to work if you move them off of port 80.

    As for running a "public facing web site", you should review the license you agreed to when you installed WHS, to make sure the use you intend isn't a violation of that license. (For example, running a business web site from your home server is likely to violate the license.) This is available by opening the Dashboard, clicking the small arrow nest to "Help", selecting "About Windows ..." and clicking on the link to the software license terms.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)


    My licence should be safe, as I'm only intending it for a "personal" public website.  If I were so concerned, I would have spent the extra $800 for the 2008 R2 licence.

    What functions are there which are supported off port 80?  Perhaps there are methods for individually re-configuring them for a new port?

    Alternatively, perhaps there some undocumented install script commands to change the default port during install of WHS?

    Monday, July 11, 2011 11:13 PM
  • What functions? The connector installation process runs off the default web site, as does quite a bit else. You can find out specifically by looking at the web applications defined on the site, but moving the site off port 80 won't work, as I've already said.

    If you have a separate domain for your alternate web site, you could perhaps use host headers (supported by IIS) to set up a separate site bound only to that URL.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by midspace Friday, July 29, 2011 8:57 AM
    Tuesday, July 12, 2011 1:27 AM
    Moderator
  • Just back from overseas and tried this now.

    Setting up correct Host Headers (Host Name under the Site Binding) has worked a treat.  Thanks.

    (In a perfect world, the routers would allow portfowarding for IPv6, and WHS would allow me to configure services on a different port.  Oh well.  Life ain't perfect.)

    Friday, July 29, 2011 9:01 AM
  • I'll note that this is, technically, not supported; nothing you configure outside the Dashboard is. And it's potentially a violation of the EULA, as configuring server roles and installing line of business apps (possibly including creating web sites) other than the ones Microsoft provides) is prohibited. Not that I would worry about it if I were you; that prohibition is probably mostly there to keep support calls down:

    Customer: "Hey, SQL Server doesn't work right on Windows Home Server!"

    Support: "Well, you aren't supposed to install LOB apps on Windows Home Server. Try an OS that supports that and let us know if things are better. kthxbai! >click<"

    (The above is a complete dramatization, of course, but I've had support conversations which were way too similar...)


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Friday, July 29, 2011 1:49 PM
    Moderator
  • Another (non-supported ) way is to use ISA server as a bridge , then WHS "sees " the ports as 80 and 443, no matter what they are.
    Ben Ogilvie www.hdtvtoyz.com
    Friday, July 29, 2011 2:30 PM
  • I think this is the proper answer for your question.

    WHS and it's "Remote Access Site" have two ports assigned. Port 80 and 443. I userped port 80 for my own website, as cover for the "Remote Access Site". I did not want users to hit port 80 and find the "Remote Access Site" and continually attempt logins.

    You can use port 80 for your own site by removing the port 80 binding from the default website, (leaving 443 in-tact) and using port 80 to support a different website installed in IIS6/7, where your default website resides. DO NO DELETE the default site, just create another site and give it port 80.

    I left the "Remote Access Site" intact in IIS, and left it's binding on port 443. This allows the site to work for remote access needs, and remains available for your use, but out of sight, as it is hosted and dynamically (ddns) found by virtue of it's free "homeserver.com" domain name hosed by MS.

    Now, port 80 can be used by your own home built site, provided you use the "homeserver.com" domain extention in naming your site, and are happy "self-hosting" your own website from the WHS. This has many advantages, i.e. immediate website updating, control over security, content, filtering and so on.

    Although I don't want to list my site directly, you are welcome to visit "cvscorp dot homeserver dot com" at both port 80 and 443, simply by changing http to https and using your same (chosen) URL. (http://domain.homeserver.com and https://domain.homeserver.com

    This will allow you to run a public facing website, without changing the default website or it's functonality. The caveat is that you are limited to the "homeserver.com" domain name, but you can flavor it with a prefix of whatever you like.

    You can then use smartertools "smarterstats" to monitor your forward facing site for SEO.

    So, the answer is no, don't move the site, move just one of the ports for the site, and leave the site itself alone.

    Hope this helps, and Yes, I'm late to the game. Got here post-time.

    (Yes, this may be in conflict with the EULA, but my reasoning is that a home server should provide you the benefits of being a home server and one is hosting a website. What you do with the website is "your business". Don't you just love it when MS says, heres a home server product, but don't use it as a home server product. You can't use features they explicitly gave you in the home server product for anything other than MS's stated purposes.)

    Make sure you "port forward", ports 80/443/4125 to the WHS in your internet facing router, or this will not work.


    • Proposed as answer by cvscorp Saturday, April 13, 2013 6:11 PM
    • Edited by cvscorp Saturday, April 13, 2013 6:20 PM
    Saturday, April 13, 2013 5:42 PM