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    I was using spysweeper and trend micro virus, now I am trying One Care. I have a question does it get rid of cookies too?
    Thursday, May 1, 2008 11:44 PM

Answers

  • OneCare does not remove cookies. You can configure cookie handling in your browser or delete them manually from IE options.

    -steve

     

    Friday, May 2, 2008 1:02 AM
    Moderator
  • You can control cookies in your browser settings. Assuming you are using IE, go to tools, Internet options, privacy.

    Either adjust the slider to your desired level or click advanced and then the option to override the automatic cookie handling option. You can select to block all cookies, be prompted for cookies, or allow cookies. You can manage 3rd party vs. 1st party cookies independently.

    OneCare adjusts this setting to Medium level, which blocks most 3rd party tracking cookies. You can adjust it higher. If you adjust it lower, OneCare will raise the setting.

    I suspect that OneCare will not be adding this option since it is currently managed quite well via the browser settings and is already managed by adjusting to a minimum of medium level, which is a decent balance for most people.

    If you like everything else about OneCare, but hate this, then consider deleting your cookies manually or using a program like ccleaner to delete them as desired.

    If you really want OneCare to manage this, please submit feedback at http://feedback.live.com

    -steve

     

     

    Friday, May 9, 2008 12:54 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • OneCare does not remove cookies. You can configure cookie handling in your browser or delete them manually from IE options.

    -steve

     

    Friday, May 2, 2008 1:02 AM
    Moderator
  • Thank you for your help, but can you explain how to all that a little clearer, I  am new at this,

      ty dc

     

    Saturday, May 3, 2008 12:44 AM
  • Hi, dc.

    Open Internet Explorer.

    Click on Tools/Internet Options and then the tab for Privacy. You can block cookies of different types by adjusting the settings here. You can click the advanced button for more detailed control.

    Personally, my opinion is to leave the settings at the default and not worry about them. That's my opinion. Cookies are harmless, for the most part.

    -steve

     

    Saturday, May 3, 2008 2:42 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks again,

                                   DC

     

    Saturday, May 3, 2008 4:14 PM
  •  Stephen Boots wrote:

    Personally, my opinion is to leave the settings at the default and not worry about them. That's my opinion. Cookies are harmless, for the most part.

    -steve

    i am very dissappointed to hear this is your opinion, cookies are NOT harmless they allow people to gather information on you and your browsing habits. I am trying the 90 day trial, had i known it was useless finding and removing spyware (cookies) i would have never downloaded it.

    will microsoft add this ability or should i buy a better anti spyware program that provides better security?

    Friday, May 9, 2008 4:18 AM
  • You can control cookies in your browser settings. Assuming you are using IE, go to tools, Internet options, privacy.

    Either adjust the slider to your desired level or click advanced and then the option to override the automatic cookie handling option. You can select to block all cookies, be prompted for cookies, or allow cookies. You can manage 3rd party vs. 1st party cookies independently.

    OneCare adjusts this setting to Medium level, which blocks most 3rd party tracking cookies. You can adjust it higher. If you adjust it lower, OneCare will raise the setting.

    I suspect that OneCare will not be adding this option since it is currently managed quite well via the browser settings and is already managed by adjusting to a minimum of medium level, which is a decent balance for most people.

    If you like everything else about OneCare, but hate this, then consider deleting your cookies manually or using a program like ccleaner to delete them as desired.

    If you really want OneCare to manage this, please submit feedback at http://feedback.live.com

    -steve

     

     

    Friday, May 9, 2008 12:54 PM
    Moderator
  •  xtrememtbkr wrote:
     Stephen Boots wrote:

    Personally, my opinion is to leave the settings at the default and not worry about them. That's my opinion. Cookies are harmless, for the most part.

    -steve

    i am very dissappointed to hear this is your opinion, cookies are NOT harmless they allow people to gather information on you and your browsing habits. I am trying the 90 day trial, had i known it was useless finding and removing spyware (cookies) i would have never downloaded it.

    will microsoft add this ability or should i buy a better anti spyware program that provides better security?

     

    To take Steve's response a step further, Cookie cleaning is useless, pointless and anyone who tells you otherwise doesn't have a clue!

     

    The simple fact is that the only proper place to perform cookie management is within the browser, since it's the only way to block or allow them on the fly. 'Cleaning' cookies simply means deleteing them after the fact, whcih is entirely pointless. The reason is that once your browser session has ended, the purpose for the cookies has too, so it's really a meaningless task. The only way to stop a Tracking Cookie from doing its thing is for the browser to refuse to modify the file in the first place, or put more clearly to 'block' the cookie.

     

    This is one of those of useless types of 'protection' that have grown into the mythology of computing. The fact that every time a user scans they see a dozen or so 'spyware' removed makes them feel good, even though in reality it not only means nothing, but even worse it means they've let these supposed spyware do their thing.

     

    As Steve mentioned, cookies are actually quite benign, but if you really don't like them they can be easily blocked in any modern browser. Even the makers of reputable anti-spyware like Spybot Search and Destroy recommend the browser method rather than cleaning them later.

     

    Why do other anti-spyware applications detect so many more tracking cookies?

     

    OneCareBear

    Tuesday, May 13, 2008 4:20 AM
    Moderator
  • My solution was to buy a better Spyware Detection Program!

    Sunday, May 18, 2008 12:41 AM
  •  Jim-bo wrote:

    My solution was to buy a better Spyware Detection Program!

    "better" is strictly an opinion, particularly in relation to the topic of this thread, but that is certainly your right.

    -steve

    Monday, May 19, 2008 3:08 PM
    Moderator
  • I have loaded the windows software to get rid of unwanted spyware, but I still have one antispy ware that contines to pop up.  How can I delete it?

     

    Monday, August 4, 2008 3:00 AM
  • Steve, you are correct. I should have said that my solution was to buy a Spyware Detection/Removal Software Application that actually detects and removes spyware to include tracking cookies versus Windows Live OneCare or Windows Defender which do not detect and remove tracking cookies.

     

    Jim-bo 

    Monday, August 4, 2008 7:34 PM
  •  stwill wrote:

    I have loaded the windows software to get rid of unwanted spyware, but I still have one antispy ware that contines to pop up.  How can I delete it?

    stwill,

     

    You didn't specify what exact item is still popping up, so it's impossible to suggest anything. Please indicate exactly what is being detected but not being removed, or simply go to OneCare Support for aid in the removal since that's likely what we'll end up suggesting anyway.

     

    What ever you do, don't waste your money on a commercial antispyware product that removes cookies, that's not needed or even useful as I already indicated above in this same thread. Tracking Cookie removal is pointless and unneeded, since every major browser can block these before they ever enter your PC. See my post above for a link to how this is done.

     

    OneCareBear

    Monday, August 4, 2008 7:57 PM
    Moderator
  • Stephen,

    What do you recommend as the best strategy for removing tracking cookies that may have been created prior to installing OneCare?

     

    Can't legacy tracking cookies still be read by web sites? Is it not the "writing" of 3rd party cookies that IE would block when in the "medium" security setting, or does IE also block the reading of any cookie that may be being used for tracking purposes?

     

    I have noticed that OneCare doesn't want to run side-by-side with other spyware programs like Adware. I have also noticed that when I tried to install Windows Defender that the install wanted OneCare removed first.

     

    Before reading this forum, I was going to install Windows Defender in hopes that it would do a better job sniffing out spyware, based on the judgment that OneCare clearly wasn't comprehensive in the area of spyware since it didn't report any of the tracking cookies that I am certain are on this machine. I am having a persistent problem with the mouse cursor jumping down to the lower left area of the desktop and setting focus on the icon there. I have explored all of the traditional issues... drivers, dirt on mouse etc. etc.. and broke down and installed one care to see if it could find if a virus or spyware was responsible for the weird mouse/cursor/keystroke behavior I am seeing.  BUT... the lack of basic tracker cookie detection leaves me wondering what other spyware detection may be missing from OneCare.

     

    1. Please suggest a practical easy way to id and remove legacy tracking cookies, that will work in conjunction with OneCare. Personally I would like to at least occasionally have a way to clear history from tracking cookies without also killing all of the beneficial cookies from the system for things like legitimate logins and site membership stuff.

     

    2. How comprehensive is OneCare for other types of spyware (besides cookies) that could be responsible for mouse/cursor/keystroke issues? I have run the OneCare virus and spyware checker and the only thing it has come up with are some old attachments on emails in backup versions of PST files that unfortunately are not very convenient to remove and don't really represent any threat to me since I have no plans of opening up those .pst files and executing the questionable attachments that exist on a few old junk mails that never got deleted prior to the backup. Unfortunately the weird mouse/cursor/keystroke behavior is still happening after the OneCare virus/spyware check and I am left wondering if OneCare just doesn't care enough about spyware or if there is some other reason (maybe a bug in Outlook for example) that is causing the behavior.

     

    Monday, August 18, 2008 8:53 PM
  • Hi, Dwayne.

    My recommendation is to delete all cookies and start fresh. Then, set your browser security settings for Privacy to block 3rd party cookies and handle other cookies as desired.

    There are 3rd party programs that will let you clean cookies selectively, but I'm not in a position to recommend any of them. Starting fresh is the best solution - and is practical.

    OneCare and Defender share malware definitions, with OneCare expanding on what is offered in Defender. Defender is disabled by OneCare because running both can cause conflicts and creates redundant protection.

    I am also unable to give you statistics on OneCare (or Defender's) ability to handle spyware. However, in my opinion, OneCare does a very good job at detecting and preventing spyware infections. If you wish to use alternative tools to scan for malware and have OneCare installed, I suggest using one of the online scanners, disabling OneCare's virus and spyware protection while running them.

    http://www.eset.com/onlinescan/

     

    http://www.ewido.net/en/onlinescan/

     

    -steve

    Tuesday, August 19, 2008 12:47 PM
    Moderator
  • I've repeatedly stated in this and other threads that cookie cleaners and anti-spyware that remove cookies are utterly pointless when using a modern browser that is configured properly. Though I've provided links for how to configure the popular browsers, I've found a better explanation of the complete issue at the following link.

     

    Blocking Unwanted Cookies with IE 7

    http://www.mvps.org/winhelp2002/cookies.htm

     

    At the bottom of this same page you will find other links to articles explaining how this works in Internet Explorer 6 and related information. Stop wasting money and time chasing down cookies, they've been a non-issue since the release of IE6 and only a non-reputable anti-spyware product would tell you otherwise.

     

    OneCareBear

    Wednesday, August 20, 2008 5:12 AM
    Moderator