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Removing "D" Drive From Pool To Store TV App's DB? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Got all of 9 hours experience with WHS.

    I'm building the box as a home TV server.

    Something called SageTV.

    Sage has it's own database, whose location I can specify.

    I don't want on the System drive bc I'll image that and restore as needed.

    Still feeling more comfortable with drive letters and knowing where something actually is, I'm tempted to pull the "D" drive that WHS created out of the drive pool and use that as the place I put stuff that I want to always know the location of.... including SageTV's database.

    What do the experienced think of this strategy?

    Am I wasting my time and trying to fool Mother Nature?

    Should I go with the flow and create a "SageDB" share and put it there?


    The two bottom line requirements:

    1) Be able to re-image C: from a backup image without losing any data.

    2) Be able to readily recover the SageDB if, for instance, the mobo goes up in smoke.
    Tuesday, March 17, 2009 11:29 PM

All replies

  • Not sure what you mean by pull the "D" drive?

    If you have multiple drives you can remove a drive from the the storage pool using the WHS Disk management and then using windows disk management you can  format and assign it a drive letter and then use it as a regular shared drive.  It will not be backed up or replicated within WHS.  I ran all my data like that on WHS last year while the data corruption problem was being fixed, plus previously preformance on the pooled drives was really bad.

    Recently I have moved pretty much everything back into the WHS Pool seeing the data corruption has been fixed and performance within the pooled drives is much better.

    You should not fiddle around with the "D" drive as WHS controls that.    Assign other driver letters to the drives outside of the storage pool.   The disadvantage to this is the fact that you cannot duplicate the data automatically.


    Tuesday, March 17, 2009 11:40 PM
  • PeteCress said:

    Got all of 9 hours experience with WHS.

    I'm building the box as a home TV server.

    Something called SageTV.

    Sage has it's own database, whose location I can specify.

    I don't want on the System drive bc I'll image that and restore as needed.

    You won't have much luck with that.  WHS handles files in the background and creates tombstones on the D parititon.  Unless you image constantly (like hourly), your image will become quickly out of date.

    PeteCress said:

    Still feeling more comfortable with drive letters and knowing where something actually is, I'm tempted to pull the "D" drive that WHS created out of the drive pool and use that as the place I put stuff that I want to always know the location of.... including SageTV's database.

    You can't do that. That partition is setup automatically by WHS.

    PeteCress said:

    What do the experienced think of this strategy?

    Am I wasting my time and trying to fool Mother Nature?

    Basically. :)

    PeteCress said:

    Should I go with the flow and create a "SageDB" share and put it there?


    The two bottom line requirements:

    1) Be able to re-image C: from a backup image without losing any data.

    2) Be able to readily recover the SageDB if, for instance, the mobo goes up in smoke.


    The best course of action (although unsupported, since it requires logging into the server desktop) would be to connect a drive to the server, but don't add it to the storage pool, then keep your DB (or anything else you don't want WHS to know about) there.
    Wednesday, March 18, 2009 1:28 AM
    Moderator
  • [quote]The best course of action (although unsupported, since it requires logging into the server desktop) would be to connect a drive to the server, but don't add it to the storage pool, then keep your DB (or anything else you don't want WHS to know about) there.[/quote]

    I think that's what I'll do.

    I guessing, though that backing up the server OS itself is not totally futile.

    If the server bites the big one - as in that little puff of smoke from the SouthBridge chip, I'm thinking maybe this:

    1) Pull all of the pool's physical drives and back each one up

    2) Put those physical drives back in the problem box.

    3) Swap out the mobo for an identical one.

    4) Image C: with the last backup image.

    5) At this point, we have a system, but the pool is hosed.

    6) Take each physical drive out of the pool

    7) Put each physical drive back into the pool

    8) Copy from backup the prior contents of each physical drive into the pooled area

    9) At this point, we're back in business.


    Sounds like a lot when written down, but basically it's donkey work.

    OTOH, re-building the system is time-intensive: installing drivers, getting the internet connection working, and so-forth..... and one would still need to do the pool drives ==> backup ===> pool thing.

    Does this sound even remotely logical?  

    Or have I been drinking too much coffee again?
    Wednesday, March 18, 2009 2:17 PM
  • PeteCress said:

    [quote]The best course of action (although unsupported, since it requires logging into the server desktop) would be to connect a drive to the server, but don't add it to the storage pool, then keep your DB (or anything else you don't want WHS to know about) there.[/quote]

    I think that's what I'll do.

    I guessing, though that backing up the server OS itself is not totally futile.

    If the server bites the big one - as in that little puff of smoke from the SouthBridge chip, I'm thinking maybe this:

    1) Pull all of the pool's physical drives and back each one up

    2) Put those physical drives back in the problem box.

    3) Swap out the mobo for an identical one.

    4) Image C: with the last backup image.

    5) At this point, we have a system, but the pool is hosed.

    6) Take each physical drive out of the pool

    7) Put each physical drive back into the pool

    8) Copy from backup the prior contents of each physical drive into the pooled area

    9) At this point, we're back in business.


    Sounds like a lot when written down, but basically it's donkey work.

    OTOH, re-building the system is time-intensive: installing drivers, getting the internet connection working, and so-forth..... and one would still need to do the pool drives ==> backup ===> pool thing.

    Does this sound even remotely logical?  

    Well, for starters, if your mobo fails and you replace with an identical one, you don't have to do anything else. ;)

    Now if you're worried about your primary hard drive failing (which is what I assume you're referring to), all you have to do is a Server Reinstallation.  It's a special install mode that lays down a new OS on your new primary drive, then it automatically re-creates all of the tombstones for all of the secondary drives.  All you have to do is re-create users and re-install add-ins/apps (which means the less customization you do, the easier a recovery will be).  In your case, I would first disconnect the non-WHS drive, then do the reinstallation.  Once it's complete, re-connect your non-WHS drive, re-install your SageTV, then point your app to the DB stored on your non-WHS drive.  It should be a lot easier than what you want to do.

    The basic premise of WHS is to install it, then leave it alone and let it do its job.  The more customizations you wish to do on your server, the less likely WHS is the product for you (instead you should consider Server 2003/2008).

    PeteCress said:

    Or have I been drinking too much coffee again?



    Wednesday, March 18, 2009 9:32 PM
    Moderator
  • You can't separate the C and D partitions. Just follow my Sage tutorial on the Sage forums, create a share for recordings in the pool and be happy.
    "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -- Thomas Paine
    Thursday, March 19, 2009 2:32 AM
  • kariya21 said:

    The basic premise of WHS is to install it, then leave it alone and let it do its job.  The more customizations you wish to do on your server, the less likely WHS is the product for you (instead you should consider Server 2003/2008)


    Thanks.

    One last question.

    Somewhere along the line, I came away with the notion that WHS balanced the load between discs.

    If that's correct, does this indicate a problem:  http://tinyurl.com/cvl7lu
    Friday, March 20, 2009 1:16 AM
  • PeteCress said:

    Thanks.

    One last question.

    Somewhere along the line, I came away with the notion that WHS balanced the load between discs.

    If that's correct, does this indicate a problem:  http://tinyurl.com/cvl7lu


    No, that's not correct.  WHS does not balance the data between the drives.  As a matter of fact it does the opposite (it stores data on the drive with the least free space first).  So what you are seeing is perfectly normal.
    Friday, March 20, 2009 1:46 AM
    Moderator