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Accessing files backed up by OneCare RRS feed

  • Question

  • Using Explorer, I tried to access the files that OneCare backed up to my external drive on my main computer.  I was not authorized to access my own files.  I ended up in a security screen that would have allowed me to change ownership of the files, but I did not want to do that for fear of causing problems with OneCare.

     

    I can't figure out how to get to my own files on my backup drive.  This worries me because I use backup primarily to protect against a hard drive failure.  How will I be able to get my files back if I lose a hard drive on one of my three computers on my home network?

     

    Also, I would like to be able to access files on my backup drive from my main computer so I don't have to run upstairs to another computer and  put them on a thumb drive or e-mail them to myself.

     

    I know these are probably basic questions; however, I do not wish to go through hundreds or thousands of postings to find an answer.  I have already spent (wasted) several hours looking for answers in several areas.  OneCare help is unexplicably difficult to navigate for simple problems like this that should not even be problems.

    Friday, November 14, 2008 9:38 PM

Answers

  • OneCare backup doesn't just copy files, it packs them into zip files and secures them as you discovered to protect them from being damaged or deleted. They are not intended to be browsed or copied manually from the backup location.

     

    What you need to do to view the files is a "Specific files Restore", which will provide a listing of all the files that you can restore found on your backup. This information is easily found in the Instant Help by typing "Restore files" into the Search box and clicking the Submit Search button. This will list a "Restore files from a backup" which tells how to do a restore of specific files as follows.

     

    To select specific files to restore or to select a specific backup to restore from:
    1. Open OneCare.
    2. In the main OneCare window, in the Backup and Restore area, click Restore files.
    3. Click Restore files from a local backup.
    4. Click Custom Restore.
    5. To restore files from the most recent backup of your computer, click Restore files from the current backup on this computer.

     

    This is why it's called Backup & Restore.

     

    OneCareBear

    Saturday, November 15, 2008 4:43 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • OneCare backup doesn't just copy files, it packs them into zip files and secures them as you discovered to protect them from being damaged or deleted. They are not intended to be browsed or copied manually from the backup location.

     

    What you need to do to view the files is a "Specific files Restore", which will provide a listing of all the files that you can restore found on your backup. This information is easily found in the Instant Help by typing "Restore files" into the Search box and clicking the Submit Search button. This will list a "Restore files from a backup" which tells how to do a restore of specific files as follows.

     

    To select specific files to restore or to select a specific backup to restore from:
    1. Open OneCare.
    2. In the main OneCare window, in the Backup and Restore area, click Restore files.
    3. Click Restore files from a local backup.
    4. Click Custom Restore.
    5. To restore files from the most recent backup of your computer, click Restore files from the current backup on this computer.

     

    This is why it's called Backup & Restore.

     

    OneCareBear

    Saturday, November 15, 2008 4:43 AM
    Moderator
  • Your answer did answer my question about how to restore my files using OneCare.  Hearing that the files are compressed is helpful, but I already guessed that and I pretty much understood the procedure for restoring already.  I guess my real emphasis should have been on asking how to access the files with explorer.  I see now that OneCare is not set up to do that for good reasons.  My original desire was to pull up a file that is not on the computer that I am using.  I did not see a way to access my other computers from this one, so I thought I might be able to go to my backup drive and pull up a file from there.  I see that this is not practical.  My main concern is still on how I would restore files in the event of a hard drive failure.  If I can't access my backed up files with any of my computers, how will I be able to restore them with a new hard drive?  At this point I am guessing that after loading all my software on a new drive and then loading OneCare, the computer will somehow be recognized as owning the files and will be able to restore backed up files.

    Saturday, November 15, 2008 8:48 PM
  • You're applying your limitied understanding of the filing system to what you [can't] see. The entire point of the security that OneCare applies to the backup folder is to make the files 'invisible' to both malware and the user himself. This is because the user is often their own worst enemy and will damage the files while browsing them.

     

    What actually happens is that when you install the external drive on another computer with OneCare, it becomes available to that copy as "from another computer". This is true even if it's the same computer with a new OS install, since the identifiers for the old PC have changed.

     

    In some cases the initial attempt to access the old backup will fail. The typical method to fix this is to start a new small backup from the 'new' PC of just a few files. This will connect the new PC to the old drive and allow it to 'see' the old backup already in place. Then, the restore process is basically the same as I already mentioned, though you may prefer to simply restore all files in such a case.

     

    The best way to verify that your data is really backed up is to attempt to restore [some of] the data, either to the same or another PC with OneCare installed. Browsing the files really tells you nothing, the only valid test is to perform the restore process itself. Doing this test is a basic part of a good Disaster Recovery plan, though it's more than can normally be expected of a typical home user, so you've already surpassed most in your browsing attempt.

     

    OneCareBear

    Sunday, November 16, 2008 1:25 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks.  I will try that.  In any case, my worries about being able to figure out how to restore files after a hard drive failure are greatly diminished.

     

    Unfortunately, my limited understanding does not apply only to filing systems.  It seems that my understanding of basically everything is limited, and ever more so as I age.  For better or for worse, that is all I have to work with.  That's one of the things that makes life interesting ;0)

    Sunday, November 16, 2008 6:51 PM