locked
Dual hard drive validation? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    This may be the wrong forum, but I can't find a more appropriate forum (since validation is the likely technical implementation of the licensing terms).

    I'm in the process of building a computer and is considering to dual boot it:

    * HardDrive1 – Web, game

    * HardDrive2 – Work, bank

    Since the motherboard and CPU (and everything else) is the same, and only one hard drive will ever be active at one time, is it enough to buy only one Windows 7 license for alternate use on both hard drives?

     

    Sunday, June 19, 2011 1:11 PM

Answers

  • Since the motherboard and CPU (and everything else) is the same, and only one hard drive will ever be active at one time, is it enough to buy only one Windows 7 license for alternate use on both hard drives?

     


    No - you need one license per installation.
     
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Sunday, June 19, 2011 1:54 PM
    Moderator
  • The license states

    1.   OVERVIEW.

    a.   Software. The software includes desktop operating system software. This software does not include Windows Live services. Windows Live is a service available from Microsoft under a separate agreement.

    b.   License Model. The software is licensed on a per copy per computer basis. A computer is a physical hardware system with an internal storage device capable of running the software. A hardware partition or blade is considered to be a separate computer.

    2.   INSTALLATION AND USE RIGHTS.

    a.   One Copy per Computer. You may install one copy of the software on one computer. That computer is the “licensed computer.”


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.

    Sunday, June 19, 2011 2:19 PM
    Answerer
  • This is my point.

    It IS the same computer (all the components except the HD are identical)!

    So I will only install on ONE computer, and is thus within the license agreement.

     

    You are only allowed to install it ONCE per license at any time."You may install one copy ...."

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Sunday, June 19, 2011 2:42 PM
    Moderator
  • A hardware partition or blade is considered to be a separate computer.

    I think this is the part that applies here fwiw.

    I don't necessarily always agree with Microsoft policy but it is what it is. 

     

    Sunday, June 19, 2011 4:46 PM
    Answerer
  • Actually, the "one installation" phrase is deterministic.  There is no way to install only once and also install in two places.  Physically impossible.  How can a single installation be in two places at the same time?  One installation per license is it.  Period.  To install in two places requires two licenses.  It is plain language.

     


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Sunday, June 19, 2011 5:12 PM
    Answerer
  • No.  You only have ONE license.  You may install ONCE per license.  Also the license specifically states

    d.   Alternative Versions. The software may include more than one version, such as 32-bit and 64-bit. You may install and use only one version at one time.

    Please read the license.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Sunday, June 19, 2011 5:15 PM
    Answerer
  • No, no, no, Noel.

    One installation per license ANYWHERE.  The user can archive (backup) but what you suggest is a multiple installation on the same license.  Everyone needs to forget "use" and "computer" and focus on "installation".   That is the key to licensing.  How many installations does the license permit?  Obviously one. 


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Sunday, June 19, 2011 6:43 PM
    Answerer

All replies

  • Since the motherboard and CPU (and everything else) is the same, and only one hard drive will ever be active at one time, is it enough to buy only one Windows 7 license for alternate use on both hard drives?

     


    No - you need one license per installation.
     
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Sunday, June 19, 2011 1:54 PM
    Moderator
  • The license states

    1.   OVERVIEW.

    a.   Software. The software includes desktop operating system software. This software does not include Windows Live services. Windows Live is a service available from Microsoft under a separate agreement.

    b.   License Model. The software is licensed on a per copy per computer basis. A computer is a physical hardware system with an internal storage device capable of running the software. A hardware partition or blade is considered to be a separate computer.

    2.   INSTALLATION AND USE RIGHTS.

    a.   One Copy per Computer. You may install one copy of the software on one computer. That computer is the “licensed computer.”


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.

    Sunday, June 19, 2011 2:19 PM
    Answerer
  • This is my point.

    It IS the same computer (all the components except the HD are identical)!

    So I will only install on ONE computer, and is thus within the license agreement.

     

    Sunday, June 19, 2011 2:36 PM
  • This is my point.

    It IS the same computer (all the components except the HD are identical)!

    So I will only install on ONE computer, and is thus within the license agreement.

     

    You are only allowed to install it ONCE per license at any time."You may install one copy ...."

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Sunday, June 19, 2011 2:42 PM
    Moderator
  • Hmm, I could still argue that the license text state ONE copy ONE computer.

    That makes room for alternating between hard drives (not using blades, not using virtualisation or any other fancy stuff).

     

    You're statement ONCE is more limiting, and not literally true (you may install "ONCE MORE" e.g. if the hard drive fails).

    The "at any time" statement is the one that in the past allowed you to use some Microsoft SW on several computers, just not at the same time.

    So by alternating between physical disks only one is guaranteed to be used at any time.

     

    But I get the point, and you seem to be sure (although it is beyond me to see that from the licensing text).

    I will not pursue this option any more (unless I get face to face with a Microsoft employed sales representative ;).

     

    Sunday, June 19, 2011 3:09 PM
  • "You may install one copy of the software on one computer"

    Not two copies on one computer or one copy on two computers.  One copy on one computer.

    Read your license.  Click Start, type Winver, hit Enter.  Click the link "Microsoft Software License Terms."

    It may not say what you are hoping it says, but it says what Microsoft means.  The key concept is how many installations you may have.  One per license. 


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.


    Sunday, June 19, 2011 3:09 PM
    Answerer
  • OK, I'll bite.

    I have read these paragraphs more than once and I am not convinced that the alternate HD is not allowed, here we go:

    1a) No problem there

    1b) No problem there, I am not using "A hardware partition or blade" (like some IBM systems or HP blade servers).

    2a) "One Copy per Computer" and that is the “licensed computer.”

      I guess this is where my interpretation differs from yours (but look at 2d before you draw any firm conclusions)

    2b) Licensed Computer only two processors - No problem there.

    2c) No problem there

    2d) "only one version at one time" Here it actually states that i can use 32 bit today, 64 bit tomorrow, 32 bit next hour and so on.

      So do you agree that if i install 32 bit on one HD and 64 bit on another HD and alternate, then it would be OK?

     

    My main point is that I do not see any reason for Microsoft to try to stop this use of a license. I *do* see the point of stopping "blade", "multi CPU", Virtualisation and so on (since those may scale up).

    I will not go into OSX and other comparable products since that is not relevant to Microsoft position. It's just that I am not convinced that Microsoft actually want to limit this usage.

     

    Sunday, June 19, 2011 3:36 PM
  • OK, I'll bite.

    I have read these paragraphs more than once and I am not convinced that the alternate HD is not allowed, here we go:

    1a) No problem there

    1b) No problem there, I am not using "A hardware partition or blade" (like some IBM systems or HP blade servers).

    2a) "One Copy per Computer" and that is the “licensed computer.”

      I guess this is where my interpretation differs from yours (but look at 2d before you draw any firm conclusions)

    2b) Licensed Computer only two processors - No problem there.

    2c) No problem there

    2d) "only one version at one time" Here it actually states that i can use 32 bit today, 64 bit tomorrow, 32 bit next hour and so on.

      So do you agree that if i install 32 bit on one HD and 64 bit on another HD and alternate, then it would be OK?

     

    My main point is that I do not see any reason for Microsoft to try to stop this use of a license. I *do* see the point of stopping "blade", "multi CPU", Virtualisation and so on (since those may scale up).

    I will not go into OSX and other comparable products since that is not relevant to Microsoft position. It's just that I am not convinced that Microsoft actually want to limit this usage.

     


    The ONLY time I can see your interpretation being anywhere near feasible is if you physically swap the HD's out of the machine - and even that's a stretch. even disconnecting the drive but leaving it in the machine could be construed as breaching the license---
    - and NO - you cannot have a 32-bit and a 64-bit installation, as that would certainly create massive problems with activation and validation.
     
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Sunday, June 19, 2011 4:32 PM
    Moderator
  • A hardware partition or blade is considered to be a separate computer.

    I think this is the part that applies here fwiw.

    I don't necessarily always agree with Microsoft policy but it is what it is. 

     

    Sunday, June 19, 2011 4:46 PM
    Answerer
  • Actually, the "one installation" phrase is deterministic.  There is no way to install only once and also install in two places.  Physically impossible.  How can a single installation be in two places at the same time?  One installation per license is it.  Period.  To install in two places requires two licenses.  It is plain language.

     


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Sunday, June 19, 2011 5:12 PM
    Answerer
  • No.  You only have ONE license.  You may install ONCE per license.  Also the license specifically states

    d.   Alternative Versions. The software may include more than one version, such as 32-bit and 64-bit. You may install and use only one version at one time.

    Please read the license.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Sunday, June 19, 2011 5:15 PM
    Answerer
  • No, no, no, Noel.

    One installation per license ANYWHERE.  The user can archive (backup) but what you suggest is a multiple installation on the same license.  Everyone needs to forget "use" and "computer" and focus on "installation".   That is the key to licensing.  How many installations does the license permit?  Obviously one. 


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Sunday, June 19, 2011 6:43 PM
    Answerer