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Any certifications for students and IT beginners? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello, I am 16 years old and I know programming pretty well but not good enough for certification...

    What certifications are good enough for 'beginners' in the IT? My main goal is a certification in MCSE. What websites are good for the certifications (free websites) and what is included in the certifications? What I need to know to pass them?

    Wednesday, November 20, 2013 11:43 AM

Answers

  • Hi, Roman!

    It's awesome that you are interested in computers and eventually becoming certified.

    One of the things you mentioned is that you were good at programming. Usually, programmers try to earn the MCSD certification while network administrators and server maintenance/installers go for the MCSE certification. Which one is right for you? Developers tend to make a little more money and are in slightly greater demand but you must love to write code and you must have strong logic, which it sounds like you do!

    I think you should consider a Microsoft MTA certification. These entry level exams are easier, cheaper, and perfect for high school students and college students. Learn more here: http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en-us/mta-certification.aspx#item-ID0EBAAAAAAAAACCA

    Note that they have three different tracks - Infrastructure, Database, and Programming. Take a look at the different tracks listed on this page, As well, read the FAQs here. Are you a network/server administrator, database manager, or programmer?

    Good luck!


    Best wishes, Davin Mickelson


    Wednesday, November 20, 2013 4:46 PM
    Answerer

All replies

  • A good beginner Microsoft certification is probably starting off with what your most familiar with............Windows 7 or Windows 8 MCP desktop certifications (http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en-us/windows-certification.aspx).  COMPTia also has good beginner certifications such as A+, Network +, and Security + to make you familiar with the very broad basics of computers to cover more than just Windows.  

    Be kind and Mark as Answer if I helped.

    Wednesday, November 20, 2013 2:32 PM
  • Roman Blum,

    I would strongly be inclined for you to persevere the A+ certification, as this will give you an in depth knowledge for your future MCSE or MCITP Accreditations.

    This the link for the A+ Accreditation:  http://certification.comptia.org/getCertified/certifications/a.aspx 

    All CompTIA examinations must be taken by a Pearson VUE Testing Centre.

    Regards,

    Bob.


    Robert Brindle MCP, MCSA & MCSE.


    • Edited by TakeIX Wednesday, November 20, 2013 4:33 PM Spelling Mistake
    Wednesday, November 20, 2013 4:11 PM
  • Hi, Roman!

    It's awesome that you are interested in computers and eventually becoming certified.

    One of the things you mentioned is that you were good at programming. Usually, programmers try to earn the MCSD certification while network administrators and server maintenance/installers go for the MCSE certification. Which one is right for you? Developers tend to make a little more money and are in slightly greater demand but you must love to write code and you must have strong logic, which it sounds like you do!

    I think you should consider a Microsoft MTA certification. These entry level exams are easier, cheaper, and perfect for high school students and college students. Learn more here: http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en-us/mta-certification.aspx#item-ID0EBAAAAAAAAACCA

    Note that they have three different tracks - Infrastructure, Database, and Programming. Take a look at the different tracks listed on this page, As well, read the FAQs here. Are you a network/server administrator, database manager, or programmer?

    Good luck!


    Best wishes, Davin Mickelson


    Wednesday, November 20, 2013 4:46 PM
    Answerer
  • The problem is the studying costs money. 

    Is there any free website for learning the MTA?

    Thursday, November 21, 2013 1:02 PM
  • Sorry - I was going to respond to your other request. I was busy.

    First off, you need to have access to the tools. Because you are student, you should have free access to the latest tools via DreamSpark. See if your school is participating in it: https://www.dreamspark.com/student/

    If this is a problem, you can always use the free "express developer tools from Microsoft. Scroll down to the free Express editions, intended for students and hobbyists: http://www.visualstudio.com/en-us/downloads

    Learn how to program on a variety of free training sites such as:

    These should get you started.

    Good luck!


    Best wishes, Davin Mickelson

    Thursday, November 21, 2013 6:44 PM
    Answerer