locked
Windows 7 Validation out of nowhere RRS feed

  • Question

  • So here's the story. A year or so ago I bought an HP Pavilion Elite desktop and used it a starting ground to upgrade/build a newer computer. I've replaced the GPU, PSU, RAM, and Motherboard more recently. I'm running Windows 7 Home Premium(64 bit) service pack 1 and everything has always run great. I run Norton Anti-virus and have already scanned so that potentially rules out the virus I initially thought it was. But I was thinking more about it and I had very recently deleted the HP folder from the Partitioned D: drive. I just got tired of all the extra "fun stuff" the HP always pops up in your face and so could that be it? my version of Windows 7 is good, I didn't try to pirate it or replace it or any of those types of things. Anyways I ran the diagnostic tool and maybe you can help me find something I'm missing because I couldn't see anything wrong with the MGAD posting.

     

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    Windows Validation Data-->

    Validation Code: 50
    Cached Online Validation Code: 0x0
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-73CQT-WMF7J-3Q6C9
    Windows Product Key Hash: KaFG+RmurcM3ZxzWyfEP9WtPUJw=
    Windows Product ID: 00359-OEM-8992687-00010
    Windows Product ID Type: 2
    Windows License Type: OEM SLP
    Windows OS version: 6.1.7601.2.00010300.1.0.003
    ID: {67D8AEF6-0B50-453E-8B42-6C2566F304D9}(1)
    Is Admin: Yes
    TestCab: 0x0
    LegitcheckControl ActiveX: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Product Name: Windows 7 Home Premium
    Architecture: 0x00000009
    Build lab: 7601.win7sp1_gdr.110408-1631
    TTS Error:
    Validation Diagnostic:
    Resolution Status: N/A

    Vista WgaER Data-->
    ThreatID(s): N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    Windows XP Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    File Exists: No
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAExec.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAAddin.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 109 N/A
    OGA Version: N/A, 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Office Diagnostics: B4D0AA8B-604-645_025D1FF3-364-80041010_025D1FF3-229-80041010_025D1FF3-230-1_025D1FF3-517-80040154_025D1FF3-237-80040154_025D1FF3-238-2_025D1FF3-244-80070002_025D1FF3-258-3

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files (x86)\Mozilla Firefox\firefox.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{67D8AEF6-0B50-453E-8B42-6C2566F304D9}</UGUID><Version>1.9.0027.0</Version><OS>6.1.7601.2.00010300.1.0.003</OS><Architecture>x64</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-3Q6C9</PKey><PID>00359-OEM-8992687-00010</PID><PIDType>2</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-1335437382-1896146244-2286031496</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>MSI</Manufacturer><Model>MS-7599</Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>American Megatrends Inc.</Manufacturer><Version>V10.7</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="6"/><Date>20101214000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>7AE13107018400FA</HWID><UserLCID>0409</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Central Standard Time(GMT-06:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM/><GANotification/></MachineData><Software><Office><Result>109</Result><Products/><Applications/></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

    Spsys.log Content: 0x80070002

    Licensing Data-->
    Software licensing service version: 6.1.7601.17514

    Name: Windows(R) 7, HomePremium edition
    Description: Windows Operating System - Windows(R) 7, OEM_SLP channel
    Activation ID: d2c04e90-c3dd-4260-b0f3-f845f5d27d64
    Application ID: 55c92734-d682-4d71-983e-d6ec3f16059f
    Extended PID: 00359-00178-926-800010-02-1033-7600.0000-2572009
    Installation ID: 001530898871474424370853361495615583282674259926600182
    Processor Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88338
    Machine Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88339
    Use License URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88341
    Product Key Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88340
    Partial Product Key: 3Q6C9
    License Status: Notification
    Notification Reason: 0xC004F057.
    Remaining Windows rearm count: 3
    Trusted time: 6/11/2011 2:02:51 PM

    Windows Activation Technologies-->
    HrOffline: 0x00000000
    HrOnline: 0xC004C533
    HealthStatus: 0x0000000000000000
    Event Time Stamp: 6:10:2011 23:44
    ActiveX: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    Admin Service: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    HealthStatus Bitmask Output:


    HWID Data-->
    HWID Hash Current: NgAAAAIABAABAAEAAAADAAAAAQABAAEAln0WB8w/4v4QM1TyJoOwmZzv+PBiPay0vqRKGY4u

    OEM Activation 1.0 Data-->
    N/A

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->
    BIOS valid for OA 2.0: yes, but no SLIC table
    Windows marker version: N/A
    OEMID and OEMTableID Consistent: N/A
    BIOS Information:
      ACPI Table Name    OEMID Value    OEMTableID Value
      APIC            7599MS        A7599200
      FACP            7599MS        A7599200
      SRAT            AMD           FAM_F_10
      HPET            7599MS        OEMHPET
      MCFG            7599MS        OEMMCFG
      OEMB            7599MS        A7599200
      SSDT            A M I         POWERNOW



    Saturday, June 11, 2011 7:14 PM

Answers

  • Correct.  Your copy of Windows was preinstalled by the manufacturer.  The license was tied to your computer through the BIOS on the motherboard.  It is an OEM SLP copy that requires a matching SLIC table in the BIOS in order to activate. 

    Windows Product ID Type: 2
    Windows License Type: OEM SLP

    That BIOS table is not in the BIOS of your new mobo. 

    BIOS valid for OA 2.0: yes, but no SLIC table
    Windows marker version: N/A
    OEMID and OEMTableID Consistent: N/A

    Because a manufacturer pays only a fraction (royalty payment) of what you would pay for Windows at retail, you do not get the right to transfer the license.  The license for your copy of Windows died when the mobo (specifically the BIOS) went away and you now need a new copy of Windows.  Purchase a full license copy of Home Premium from the Microsoft Store or Amazon (NOT the Marketplace) and all you have to do is replace the product key.  You should be able to avoid reinstalling Windows.

    Here is the specific question and answer that applies to your situation

    (OEM FAQS at http://www.microsoft.com/oem/en/licensing/sblicensing/pages/licensing_faq.aspx#faq2)

    Q. Can a PC with an OEM Windows operating system have its motherboard upgraded and keep the same license? What if it was replaced because it was defective?

    A. Generally, an end user can upgrade or replace all of the hardware components on a computer—except the motherboard—and still retain the license for the original Microsoft OEM operating system software. If the motherboard is upgraded or replaced for reasons other than a defect, then a new computer has been created. Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be transferred to the new computer, and the license of new operating system software is required. If the motherboard is replaced because it is defective, you do not need to acquire a new operating system license for the PC as long as the replacement motherboard is the same make/model or the same manufacturer's replacement/equivalent, as defined by the manufacturer's warranty.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.

    Saturday, June 11, 2011 8:04 PM
    Answerer
  • "Pettyjohnb" wrote in message news:e28da60a-97cf-4412-afe8-c9d3ddfa9e35...

    So here's the story. A year or so ago I bought an HP Pavilion Elite desktop and used it a starting ground to upgrade/build a newer computer. I've replaced the GPU, PSU, RAM, and Motherboard more recently. I'm running Windows 7 Home Premium(64 bit) service pack 1 and everything has always run great. I run Norton Anti-virus and have already scanned so that potentially rules out the virus I initially thought it was. But I was thinking more about it and I had very recently deleted the HP folder from the Partitioned D: drive. I just got tired of all the extra "fun stuff" the HP always pops up in your face and so could that be it? my version of Windows 7 is good, I didn't try to pirate it or replace it or any of those types of things. Anyways I ran the diagnostic tool and maybe you can help me find something I'm missing because I couldn't see anything wrong with the MGAD posting.

     

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    Windows Validation Data-->

    Validation Code: 50
    Cached Online Validation Code: 0x0
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-73CQT-WMF7J-3Q6C9
    Windows Product Key Hash: KaFG+RmurcM3ZxzWyfEP9WtPUJw=
    Windows Product ID: 00359-OEM-8992687-00010
    Windows Product ID Type: 2
    Windows License Type: OEM SLP
    Windows OS version: 6.1.7601.2.00010300.1.0.003




    Replacing the motherboard means that you no longer have the same PC - and your OEM copy of Windows is no longer valid.
    You *may* be lucky and be able to telephone activate using the COA Key - but it's more likely that you will have to purchase a new Retail license for Windows

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Saturday, June 11, 2011 7:26 PM
    Moderator
  • Great info and fast responses. You guys were very helpful, and I appreciate it a ton. Now it looks like I have my work cut out for me in trying to get everything in sync over the phone.  :)
    • Marked as answer by Pettyjohnb Saturday, June 11, 2011 8:14 PM
    Saturday, June 11, 2011 8:14 PM

All replies

  • oh and I don't know if it helps but Build 7601
    Saturday, June 11, 2011 7:15 PM
  • "Pettyjohnb" wrote in message news:e28da60a-97cf-4412-afe8-c9d3ddfa9e35...

    So here's the story. A year or so ago I bought an HP Pavilion Elite desktop and used it a starting ground to upgrade/build a newer computer. I've replaced the GPU, PSU, RAM, and Motherboard more recently. I'm running Windows 7 Home Premium(64 bit) service pack 1 and everything has always run great. I run Norton Anti-virus and have already scanned so that potentially rules out the virus I initially thought it was. But I was thinking more about it and I had very recently deleted the HP folder from the Partitioned D: drive. I just got tired of all the extra "fun stuff" the HP always pops up in your face and so could that be it? my version of Windows 7 is good, I didn't try to pirate it or replace it or any of those types of things. Anyways I ran the diagnostic tool and maybe you can help me find something I'm missing because I couldn't see anything wrong with the MGAD posting.

     

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    Windows Validation Data-->

    Validation Code: 50
    Cached Online Validation Code: 0x0
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-73CQT-WMF7J-3Q6C9
    Windows Product Key Hash: KaFG+RmurcM3ZxzWyfEP9WtPUJw=
    Windows Product ID: 00359-OEM-8992687-00010
    Windows Product ID Type: 2
    Windows License Type: OEM SLP
    Windows OS version: 6.1.7601.2.00010300.1.0.003




    Replacing the motherboard means that you no longer have the same PC - and your OEM copy of Windows is no longer valid.
    You *may* be lucky and be able to telephone activate using the COA Key - but it's more likely that you will have to purchase a new Retail license for Windows

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Saturday, June 11, 2011 7:26 PM
    Moderator
  • but I've had this new motherboard in my system for well over a month now, and then yesterday I got on my comp and my screen was black and I got the balloon and you know the rest of the story. But are you saying that replacing that is what caused this? or if I tried to call and get the key I wouldn't be able to now.
    Saturday, June 11, 2011 7:34 PM
  • "Pettyjohnb" wrote in message news:18ba1010-fc3d-4a77-91cd-e7eb7453933a...
    but I've had this new motherboard in my system for well over a month now, and then yesterday I got on my comp and my screen was black and I got the balloon and you know the rest of the story. But are you saying that replacing that is what caused this? or if I tried to call and get the key I wouldn't be able to now.
    I suspect that you didn't notice the 'Please activate your system' warnings - which should have come up periodically over the past 30 days - until the screen went black.

     
    OEM Licenses live and die on the first computer on which they are installed - for licensing purposes, the computer is defined as the motherboard. The reasoning is simple. An OEM gets the licenses very cheap - on condition that they support the OS and the hardware. The OEM cannot be expected to support hardware that it didn't provide, and may be vastly different from what they did provide. Pretty much anything else is up for grabs, but the motherboard is the key component on which everything else hangs, hence the rule. The only exception is where the motherboard fails, and it is replaced by the OEM itself under warranty repairs.
     
    There's certainly nothing to prevent you trying to change your product Key to the one on your COA sticker, and attempting to activate that - it would have to be telephone activation anyhow (and you'll probably need to speak to an operator).
     
    If it fails, you've lost nothing (most lines are toll-free), and if it passes, you're ahead of the game :)
     
    If it does fail, then you 'll have to stump up for a Full Retail license for whichever edition of Win 7 you want. If you buy Home Premium, you can simply swap the Product Key from your new copy into the existing installation and activate that. Any other edition, and you'll have at least to do an upgrade install, and in the case of Home Basic, you'd need to do a Clean Install.
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Saturday, June 11, 2011 7:53 PM
    Moderator
  • Correct.  Your copy of Windows was preinstalled by the manufacturer.  The license was tied to your computer through the BIOS on the motherboard.  It is an OEM SLP copy that requires a matching SLIC table in the BIOS in order to activate. 

    Windows Product ID Type: 2
    Windows License Type: OEM SLP

    That BIOS table is not in the BIOS of your new mobo. 

    BIOS valid for OA 2.0: yes, but no SLIC table
    Windows marker version: N/A
    OEMID and OEMTableID Consistent: N/A

    Because a manufacturer pays only a fraction (royalty payment) of what you would pay for Windows at retail, you do not get the right to transfer the license.  The license for your copy of Windows died when the mobo (specifically the BIOS) went away and you now need a new copy of Windows.  Purchase a full license copy of Home Premium from the Microsoft Store or Amazon (NOT the Marketplace) and all you have to do is replace the product key.  You should be able to avoid reinstalling Windows.

    Here is the specific question and answer that applies to your situation

    (OEM FAQS at http://www.microsoft.com/oem/en/licensing/sblicensing/pages/licensing_faq.aspx#faq2)

    Q. Can a PC with an OEM Windows operating system have its motherboard upgraded and keep the same license? What if it was replaced because it was defective?

    A. Generally, an end user can upgrade or replace all of the hardware components on a computer—except the motherboard—and still retain the license for the original Microsoft OEM operating system software. If the motherboard is upgraded or replaced for reasons other than a defect, then a new computer has been created. Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be transferred to the new computer, and the license of new operating system software is required. If the motherboard is replaced because it is defective, you do not need to acquire a new operating system license for the PC as long as the replacement motherboard is the same make/model or the same manufacturer's replacement/equivalent, as defined by the manufacturer's warranty.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.

    Saturday, June 11, 2011 8:04 PM
    Answerer
  • Great info and fast responses. You guys were very helpful, and I appreciate it a ton. Now it looks like I have my work cut out for me in trying to get everything in sync over the phone.  :)
    • Marked as answer by Pettyjohnb Saturday, June 11, 2011 8:14 PM
    Saturday, June 11, 2011 8:14 PM