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Documentation in SDLC RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi, 

        I would like to know who will do the documentations in Software life cycle. Eg: Business requirements, Technical specifications, Functional requirements, etc. Please anyone can give me proper anwer !!!!  

    Friday, January 24, 2014 7:51 AM

Answers

  • Hi, QA Boy.

    Project owners, project managers, lead architects, and lead developers can help interview the users of the solution and document them into project requirements. It's different for every project and for every company depending on the size of the team, the project, and the company.

    Eventually these documents are published to the SharePoint portal site created when a Team Foundation Server (TFS) project is created. These requirements are then mapped to TFS work items which are assigned to team members. It should never me one person in charge of all the documentation but instead the lead team members of various departments can assist with maintaining the documentation. The documents should be "living", meaning they should be changed as necessary when project requirements change.

    You can certainly use Microsoft's Application Life Cycle Management (ALM) MSDN site to learn more. Microsoft now prefers ALM over Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC). Here:
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/fda2bad5.aspx

    This forum is for Microsoft certification and Microsoft Learning. I suspect that most of your questions can be answered on one of the TFS ALM forums, such as this one:
    http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/vstudio/en-US/home?forum=tfsgeneral

    Good luck!


    Best wishes, Davin Mickelson

    Friday, January 24, 2014 2:38 PM
    Answerer

All replies

  • Hi, QA Boy.

    Project owners, project managers, lead architects, and lead developers can help interview the users of the solution and document them into project requirements. It's different for every project and for every company depending on the size of the team, the project, and the company.

    Eventually these documents are published to the SharePoint portal site created when a Team Foundation Server (TFS) project is created. These requirements are then mapped to TFS work items which are assigned to team members. It should never me one person in charge of all the documentation but instead the lead team members of various departments can assist with maintaining the documentation. The documents should be "living", meaning they should be changed as necessary when project requirements change.

    You can certainly use Microsoft's Application Life Cycle Management (ALM) MSDN site to learn more. Microsoft now prefers ALM over Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC). Here:
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/fda2bad5.aspx

    This forum is for Microsoft certification and Microsoft Learning. I suspect that most of your questions can be answered on one of the TFS ALM forums, such as this one:
    http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/vstudio/en-US/home?forum=tfsgeneral

    Good luck!


    Best wishes, Davin Mickelson

    Friday, January 24, 2014 2:38 PM
    Answerer
  • Thanks Mr. Davin for your reply. But i have one more doubt that regarding the documentations in QA team. They have to prepare the Test plan and the test cases for the product quality other than that is there any participation needed ? i mean for the functional documentation ?
    Monday, January 27, 2014 5:42 AM
  • This question can only be answered on a per team, per project basis.

    Normally, the answer is going to be "NO" on a larger team. The QA team is in charge of forming test cases, running tests, recording results, forming bug work items, and everything related to ensuring the quality of the application. If a new functional requirement is discovered by a tester and should be added, then they need to communicate with the development and project leaders and owners.

    If a more Agile approach is being used or if the team is quite small, then perhaps new functional requirements will be discovered during testing.

    As I said, I think you should be asking this question on a different forum, like the TFS forum that I specified above.

    There is no hard set of rules for everyone to follow when it comes to ALM. Every team and project is different.

    Good luck!


    Best wishes, Davin Mickelson

    Monday, January 27, 2014 5:56 PM
    Answerer
  • Thanks for your reply...
    Tuesday, February 4, 2014 8:53 AM