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  • Question

  • It would seem to me as MSs would call another idiot has been taken, Why is it that it is only the customer is the one who has to pay for these so called fake disks Why do we have to take MS word that they are fake, I mean THEY WOULD SAY THAT WOULD,NT THEY. tell me one Individual in a thosand that understands all these * () 2 etc etc that THEY say is proof of authenticity, Oh of coarse its microsoft who decides , they must be right, they don't make mistakes, THE ____ they dont,but of corse they are the ones calling the shots, and us poor idiots have to pay , my point is that if Microsoft makes a disk that is easly copied as authentic, IN MY VIEW they should pay   

     

     

     

     

     

    • Moved by Darin Smith MSModerator Wednesday, September 1, 2010 7:14 PM Not a request for technical assistance. Moving to Feedback and Comments forum (From:Windows 7 Genuine Advantage Validation Issues (Windows 7))
    Wednesday, September 1, 2010 10:42 AM

Answers

  • be aware that the new family pack is only for upgrades and is only for a limited time. 

    http://store.microsoft.com/microsoft/Windows-7-Home-Premium-Upgrade-Family-Pack/product/87DFFF11

    this is an upgrade for Windows 7 Home Premium.  The upgrade meaning that if you ever need to reinstall this software you will have to install your past version of Windows on the computer before you can upgrade.

    For assistancew with any installation or activation help, you would be best supported by the Microsoft Technical Support team. They have the tools and resources to effectively troubleshoot technical concerns.  With a recent purchase you may qualify for free technical support.  They are available by phone Monday-Friday 5am-9pm PST; 6am-3pm PST on weekends at 1-800-936-5700.

    Tuesday, October 5, 2010 8:08 PM

All replies

  • If that is truly how you feel consult a lawyer but people use this forum to get help, none of us work for MS so this is falling on deaf ears. By the way your assertions are baseless. MS has the right to protect their property, and if they didn't the loss of profits would likely result in cuts which would result in layoffs which in a down economy is very bad. If piracy causes one person to lose their lively hood then MS would be remiss in not doing their best to fight it.
    Wednesday, September 1, 2010 1:09 PM
  • Well now consult a lawer,you say, I have £500 not £ 500.000.000.000.000. and so on and so on in the bank , and of course theie are other repercussions that would not acure to me or any other individual,but I would.nt be so  sure it fell I deaf ears yours is the only respons Ive had

    Wednesday, September 1, 2010 4:13 PM
  • If you buy a stolen car, the police have a right to take it from you, without compensation, and return it to its rightful owner. What is so different about Microsoft having the right to deny use of stolen software belonging to them?

    Here's the deal . . .

    There are hackers and then there are just plain thieves. A hacker may go to the store and buy a boxed version of Windows, copy it and then sell it. The hacker will then do one of two things; create new keys for the software and then possibly sell it in various ways. There will likely be a limited number of keys generated, and after those keys are activated more times than they should be, Microsoft catches on and the poor end user is out his purchase price.

    The next possibility is MSDN, TechNet, Partner subscriptions which are for developers, partners, beta testers, etc. The purpose of these subscriptions is for testing and/or for internal use only by the company or individual holding the subscription. These come in either solid media or as downloads (which are cheaper) and each product key can be activated a particular number of times. So, the thief (worse than a hacker as far as I'm concerned) creates DVDs of Windows and supplies the product key to the unsuspecting buyer. Once that activation number has been reached, Microsoft again catches on and those keys are invalidated.

    The unscrupulous hacker/subscriber has now made a bucket load of money off illegally sold Microsoft product. The unsuspecting end user has lost his/her money and Microsoft loses good will, as it seems to have lost yours. This isn't a small potatoes operation; it happens in the US, in China, in Europe, Germany, Japan, you name a country, large or small, and it most likely happens there.

    As long as there's a demand for product that costs a fraction of what the street price is, the unscrupulous hacker/seller makes money while we and Microsoft lose millions of dollars, if not billions.

    There is an old adage I read in my youth (too many years ago) that says, "Let the buyer beware." That's a little harsh, but should put everyone on notice that "If it's too good to be true, it probably is." Ideally, it would be the unscrupulous person who sold the stolen goods who would pay in the long run, but I'm afraid that happens all too few times. It's usually the person such as we see here who ends up paying the price.

    This is not to say I'm unsympathetic to the person who's been taken advantage of. I am an activist in a real world problem at this time, and although my friends and neighbors don't want to get "involved" I will continue to fight for them.

    Until we can educate those who have been duped by unscrupulous people selling stolen goods for a less than practical cost, people will continue to be taken in. A sad tale, but true.

    I hope I've helped you to understand that it is not feasible for Microsoft to swallow the millions or billions of dollars these unscrupulous people have cheated us out of. They'd be out of business in less than five years.


    Nancy Ward
    Windows 8 BetaFerret

    "brainless2" wrote in message news:e49e9848-9247-4832-845d-12ad20b48a12@communitybridge.codeplex.com...

    It would seem to me as MSs would call another idiot has been taken, Why is it that it is only the customer is the one who has to pay for these so called fake disks Why do we have to take MS word that they are fake, I mean THEY WOULD SAY THAT WOULD,NT THEY. tell me one Individual in a thosand that understands all these * () 2 etc etc that THEY say is proof of authenticity, Oh of coarse its microsoft who decides , they must be right, they don't make mistakes, THE __ they dont,but of corse they are the ones calling the shots, and us poor idiots have to pay , my point is that if Microsoft makes a disk that is easly copied as authentic, IN MY VIEW they should pay


    Nancy Ward
    Wednesday, September 1, 2010 5:34 PM
  • I don't work for MS, I have no stake in the game other than I like helping people out. I do not like product activation, I wish it wasn't a fact that we have to deal with but I like helping people solve their problems as they arise.

    That said, almost every problem that comes through here is related to keys sold in violation of subscriptions, hacks or exploits. A few problems have been related to malware, hardware failures (bitware caused by memory, drives, processors, etc), and third party software. If MS needs to improve on anything it is general system security and resistance to malware, WAT despite my original opinions has been very successful with few false positives, which if it is going to be part of the windows platform from here on out it needs to be.

    If honest people, who purchased software in a sensible fashion start getting flagged by WAT in even low numbers it will be a problem for MS, People who purchase software from the cheapest online vendor they can find and are willing to risk getting bad software will continue to purchase software in such a manner until they realize that most people who purchase responsibly have no problems.

    IMHO, MS makes a good product (people wouldn't be trying to get it for free if it wasn't), MS does good things with a portion of its profit as a company and Bill Gates is a philanthropist and donates from his personal fortune, it is a company I do not mind giving money to in exchange for a good product. That said I feel that MS's licensing policy is not friendly to families, I would like to see the family pack return and remain a permanent part of the MS licensing structure or a family based subscription package. The way licensing impacts families is my one and only beef with the status quo and I think an attractive subscription would reduce piracy, not profits. 

    As to your question, no, MS does not call the shots. You call the shots when you decide what product you are going to buy, no one forced you to purchase the product an it is your responsibility to research and educate yourself so you can make a safe purchase. You imply the MS may somehow be dishonest in how they protect their product. I have not seen that, and I do not agree with the implication. 

     

     

    Wednesday, September 1, 2010 5:56 PM
  •  That said I feel that MS's licensing policy is not friendly to families, I would like to see the family pack return and remain a permanent part of the MS licensing structure or a family based subscription package. The way licensing impacts families is my one and only beef with the status quo and I think an attractive subscription would reduce piracy, not profits. 
    You got your wish Windows 7 Family Pack Makes a Return

    Darin MS
    Thursday, September 2, 2010 3:52 PM
    Moderator
  • WooHoo
    Thursday, September 2, 2010 5:44 PM
  • be aware that the new family pack is only for upgrades and is only for a limited time. 

    http://store.microsoft.com/microsoft/Windows-7-Home-Premium-Upgrade-Family-Pack/product/87DFFF11

    this is an upgrade for Windows 7 Home Premium.  The upgrade meaning that if you ever need to reinstall this software you will have to install your past version of Windows on the computer before you can upgrade.

    For assistancew with any installation or activation help, you would be best supported by the Microsoft Technical Support team. They have the tools and resources to effectively troubleshoot technical concerns.  With a recent purchase you may qualify for free technical support.  They are available by phone Monday-Friday 5am-9pm PST; 6am-3pm PST on weekends at 1-800-936-5700.

    Tuesday, October 5, 2010 8:08 PM