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Failing PC Hard Drive -- How to Restore to a New Unformatted Hard Drive RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a fully updated Vista Ultimate 64-bit OS installed using Bootcamp on two 1TB drives (C and D) in a 2008 Mac Pro. The D drive (which is failing according to SMART, and which could not be repaired using CHKDSK) only contains some of the Vista boot information (including BCD), so it uses less than 2GB. The C drive, which is functioning well, contains all my programs and documents, and has roughly 230GB filled.
     
    The D drive was backed up to my HP EX470 WHS about one week ago, but can no longer be backed up. The C drive still backs up every night.  The EX470 also is fully updated (including Powerpack 1).

    I would like to replace the D drive with a new unformatted 1TB drive and restore from the EX470. I have downloaded the Microsoft WHS restore program and have burned a bootable restore CD.

    However, I have never done a restore before, and am uncertain whether it will function properly given my configuration. I would welcome advice -- perhaps even a step-by-step algorithm -- before trying to restore. For example, do I need to format the new hard drive to NTFS before proceeding? Will the restore procedure also restore all the Vista boot information on the D drive? Is there some reason that I would also need to restore the C drive, even though it is functioning well? Will the 64-bit drivers for the Mac Pro function properly with the restore CD?

    Many thanks in advance for your advice and suggestions!

    Friday, March 13, 2009 12:29 AM

Answers

  • Hi,
    this FAQ describes how you can restore drives from within a running OS, using ClientRestoreWizard.exe. The main point is to create the target volumes for restoring before the backup can be restored.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Friday, March 13, 2009 3:06 AM
    Moderator
  • Many thanks to Olaf!

    Apologies for not writing earlier. It took me a while to obtain and set up the external enclosure with a new hard drive and get it properly formatted.

    Today, I implemented Olaf's procedure and it went without a glitch. I used a different (XP Pro) PC to restore the Mac Vista's D drive from the EX470 WHS through the Restore Wizard and then inserted the healthy D drive clone into the Mac. All seems to be working properly (booting, backup, etc). Ultimately, the WHS image-based backup and restore saved me a great deal of frustration and time, just as intended.

     
    • Marked as answer by kimhome Saturday, March 28, 2009 7:28 PM
    Saturday, March 28, 2009 7:28 PM

All replies

  • Hi,
    this FAQ describes how you can restore drives from within a running OS, using ClientRestoreWizard.exe. The main point is to create the target volumes for restoring before the backup can be restored.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Friday, March 13, 2009 3:06 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi, Olaf.

    Thanks for your thoughtful response!

    If I understand your FAQ correctly and try to apply it to my situation, you would recommend the following procedure:

    1. Attach my new unformatted drive to another PC (in this case, with a Windows XP Pro SP3 OS) that is connected to the HP EX470 via WHS. In my case, I would plan to attach the new drive via a USB 2.0 external enclosure.

    2. Format the unformatted external drive as NTFS.

    3. Run ClientRestoreWizard.exe from the XP Pro PC to restore the Vista Ultimate 64-bit D drive content from the EX470 to the newly NTFS-formatted external drive.

    4. Replace the failing D drive on the Vista Ultimate side of the Mac Pro with the new drive.

    5. Do not alter the functioning C drive on the Vista Ultimate side of the Mac Pro.

    Did I understand your FAQ correctly? Could I skip the formatting step? Is there anything else that you would recommend?

    Many thanks for your advice,

    Kim
    • Marked as answer by kimhome Saturday, March 28, 2009 7:20 PM
    • Unmarked as answer by kimhome Saturday, March 28, 2009 7:21 PM
    Friday, March 13, 2009 12:19 PM
  • I assume you can add the drive directly to your Mac Pro without having to use another machine.
    It should be enough to create the volume in equal or larger size in disk management. If formatting should be required, quick format is enough, so that step is not really time consuming.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Friday, March 13, 2009 2:21 PM
    Moderator
  • Olaf Engelke said:

    I assume you can add the drive directly to your Mac Pro without having to use another machine.
    It should be enough to create the volume in equal or larger size in disk management. If formatting should be required, quick format is enough, so that step is not really time consuming.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf

    Hi, Olaf.

    Thanks for your response, but the assumption may be problematic. There are currently four drives in the Mac Pro, using all four bays. Two of the drives are Mac OS, the other two (described earlier in this thread) are Vista Ultimate 64 OS. I don't think I could simply remove the Mac drives without potentially creating a different problem. That's why I proposed to put the unformatted drive in an enclosure, attach it to a different PC that is connected to the EX470 (consistent with your recommendation), restore the D drive contents from the EX470 to that external drive, and then finally substitute it for the failing D drive in the Mac Pro.

    Would this latter procedure work? If you have a different approach in mind, or foresee problems with my approach, I would be grateful for your feedback.

    Many thanks in advance for your time and effort,

    Kim

    Friday, March 13, 2009 11:28 PM
  • Hi Kim,
    yes, the procedure as you describe should work. (In the other situation the only problem might be to select the proper volume as restore target, although I would not see it as problem myself.)
    Good luck
    Olaf
    Saturday, March 14, 2009 6:45 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks, Olaf.

    I'm waiting for an enclosure to arrive this week, and will try out the procedure and let you know how it goes. I appreciate your support.

    Best regards,

    Kim
    Saturday, March 14, 2009 9:47 PM
  • Hi,
    instead of an enclosure I prefer these USB to IDE/SATA cables, which allow you to connect a disk on the fly.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Sunday, March 15, 2009 8:14 AM
    Moderator
  • Many thanks to Olaf!

    Apologies for not writing earlier. It took me a while to obtain and set up the external enclosure with a new hard drive and get it properly formatted.

    Today, I implemented Olaf's procedure and it went without a glitch. I used a different (XP Pro) PC to restore the Mac Vista's D drive from the EX470 WHS through the Restore Wizard and then inserted the healthy D drive clone into the Mac. All seems to be working properly (booting, backup, etc). Ultimately, the WHS image-based backup and restore saved me a great deal of frustration and time, just as intended.

     
    • Marked as answer by kimhome Saturday, March 28, 2009 7:28 PM
    Saturday, March 28, 2009 7:28 PM