locked
Windows 7 not Genuine after OEM motherboard replacement RRS feed

  • Question

  • Purchased computer from HP directly online mid Jan 2011.

    Intel Core I7-2600 3.4ghz, 8 gb RAM, integrated everything except video card. On board video is disabled and the system shipped with an Nvidia GeForce GT440 card.

    Shortly after I was notified that the motherboard was affected by the Intel 6 Series Chipset recall and that the entire motheboard would need to be replaced. The motherboard was replaced in home by a technician dispatched directly from HP. The motherboard arrived via FedEX overnight directly from HP before the technician arrived. The HP technician replaced the motherboard near the end of April 2011, so just over a month and a half ago (about 45 days). Everything seemed fine after the replacement until yesterday when the desktop went black and there are now indicators stating that the Windows 7 is not genuine. If I try to activate, Windows says that the product key is invalid. At the end of this message is my MGAdiag output. I started to look around and it appears that my bios no longer contains any product specific informaiton. My computer serial number, product ID's and hardware ID's are all blank. Looking at the MGAdiag ouput, it appears that my new HP motherboard does not have a SLIC table. It appears that maybe when the motherboard was replaced, it contained only generic bios information and does not include the same product specific information that the original motherboard had. I tried the recovery CD's from HP, but the installation says that the discs are not valid on my hardware.

    Can you validate the activation issue? Do I need HP to update my bios? Am I missing the proper SLIC table? I have debated using the COA number on the side of the case, but the fact that the recovery CD's would concern me if I have issues down the road.

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    Windows Validation Data-->

    Validation Code: 50
    Cached Online Validation Code: 0x0
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-73CQT-WMF7J-3Q6C9
    Windows Product Key Hash: KaFG+RmurcM3ZxzWyfEP9WtPUJw=
    Windows Product ID: 00359-OEM-8992687-00010
    Windows Product ID Type: 2
    Windows License Type: OEM SLP
    Windows OS version: 6.1.7600.2.00010300.0.0.003
    ID: {9821C1A7-A3BC-405E-B5B1-450DEA218333}(3)
    Is Admin: Yes
    TestCab: 0x0
    LegitcheckControl ActiveX: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Product Name: Windows 7 Home Premium
    Architecture: 0x00000009
    Build lab: 7600.win7_gdr.110408-1633
    TTS Error:
    Validation Diagnostic:
    Resolution Status: N/A

    Vista WgaER Data-->
    ThreatID(s): N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    Windows XP Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    File Exists: No
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAExec.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    OGAAddin.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 100 Genuine
    Microsoft Office Professional Plus 2007 - 100 Genuine
    OGA Version: N/A, 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Office Diagnostics: 025D1FF3-364-80041010_025D1FF3-229-80041010_025D1FF3-230-1_025D1FF3-517-80040154_025D1FF3-237-80040154_025D1FF3-238-2_025D1FF3-244-80070002_025D1FF3-258-3

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files (x86)\Internet Explorer\IEXPLORE.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Prompt
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{9821C1A7-A3BC-405E-B5B1-450DEA218333}</UGUID><Version>1.9.0027.0</Version><OS>6.1.7600.2.00010300.0.0.003</OS><Architecture>x64</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-3Q6C9</PKey><PID>00359-OEM-8992687-00010</PID><PIDType>2</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-2547812139-4142243114-1460264225</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>Hewlett-Packard</Manufacturer><Model>SLIC-CPC</Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>AMI</Manufacturer><Version>7.09</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="6"/><Date>20110225000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>34B83607018400FE</HWID><UserLCID>0409</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Eastern Standard Time(GMT-05:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM/><GANotification/></MachineData><Software><Office><Result>100</Result><Products><Product GUID="{91120000-0011-0000-0000-0000000FF1CE}"><LegitResult>100</LegitResult><Name>Microsoft Office Professional Plus 2007</Name><Ver>12</Ver><Val>F092A7A9CEAF71</Val><Hash>8sZyw0CHZ/Qp4Y2TprISDP6oaPk=</Hash><Pid>89446-952-0833473-65574</Pid><PidType>1</PidType></Product></Products><Applications><App Id="15" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="16" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="18" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="19" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="1A" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="1B" Version="12" Result="100"/><App Id="44" Version="12" Result="100"/></Applications></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

    Spsys.log Content: 0x80070002

    Licensing Data-->
    Software licensing service version: 6.1.7600.16385

    Name: Windows(R) 7, HomePremium edition
    Description: Windows Operating System - Windows(R) 7, OEM_SLP channel
    Activation ID: d2c04e90-c3dd-4260-b0f3-f845f5d27d64
    Application ID: 55c92734-d682-4d71-983e-d6ec3f16059f
    Extended PID: 00359-00178-926-800010-02-1033-7600.0000-2052009
    Installation ID: 013582398563100814042740110890708103347362806380532236
    Processor Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88338
    Machine Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88339
    Use License URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88341
    Product Key Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88340
    Partial Product Key: 3Q6C9
    License Status: Notification
    Notification Reason: 0xC004F057.
    Remaining Windows rearm count: 2
    Trusted time: 6/5/2011 1:13:45 PM

    Windows Activation Technologies-->
    HrOffline: 0x00000000
    HrOnline: 0x00000000
    HealthStatus: 0x0000000000000000
    Event Time Stamp: 4:28:2011 19:05
    ActiveX: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    Admin Service: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395
    HealthStatus Bitmask Output:


    HWID Data-->
    HWID Hash Current: LAAAAAEAAQABAAEAAAACAAAAAQABAAEAln1mSPB1NBDA0SA/zp/45yIRLnM=

    OEM Activation 1.0 Data-->
    N/A

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->
    BIOS valid for OA 2.0: yes, but no SLIC table
    Windows marker version: N/A
    OEMID and OEMTableID Consistent: N/A
    BIOS Information:
      ACPI Table Name OEMID Value OEMTableID Value
      APIC   HPQOEM  SLIC-CPC
      FACP   HPQOEM  SLIC-CPC
      DBGP   HPQOEM  SLIC-CPC
      HPET   HPQOEM  SLIC-CPC
      MCFG   HPQOEM  SLIC-CPC
      SSDT   HPQOEM  SLIC-CPC

     

     

    Sunday, June 5, 2011 5:33 PM

Answers

  • "RSustar" wrote in message news:27e96eb4-2f81-408d-83f9-bba07215109a...

    My comment regarding the fixing the validation using the COA Key is in reference to making it appear that the issue is solved, when the root cause still exists. It appears that invalid or incomplete BIOS information is prohibitting me from validating windows and running the recovery disk. HP's recovery disk must be looking for something in the BIOS which does not exist. If I fix the issue using the COA key, then I won't have a validation issue and I will only have a potential problem with the BIOS.

    HP customer support won't put much effort into a potential problem.

    Thanks for the info


    Using The COA Key removes the need for the BIOS SLIC table completely.
    It would be unusual for a manufacturer's recovery set to actively check the BIOS before installation, but not unheard of (Dell used to do it - but I don't believe they do any longer) for precisely the reasons you're discovering now.
     
    Go batter HP's collective heads against the nearest brick wall until they cough up a new BIOS! <g>
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Sunday, June 5, 2011 9:11 PM
    Moderator
  • To further explain how the OEM Product keys and Bios Flags work:

     

    Computers, which are built by large manufactures that come with Windows Pre-Installed, come with two (2) Product Keys:

    A)   OEM SLP: This key comes pre-installed in Windows, when it comes from the Factory. This key is geared to work with the OEM Bios Flag found only on that Manufacturer's computer hardware. So when Windows was installed using the OEM SLP key (at the factory) Windows looks at the motherboard and sees the proper OEM Bios Flag (for that Manufacturer and that version of Windows) and Self-Activates.

     

    B)    COA SLP: This is the Product key that you see on the sticker on the side (or bottom) of your computer. It is a valid product key, but should only be used in limited situations (such as if the OEM SLP key stops self-activating for whatever reason...including invalid or incomplete BIOS). The key must be activated by Phone.

     

      The CoA SLP key is provided as a Backup just in case of such an issue as you are experiencing.


    Darin MS
    Monday, June 6, 2011 8:37 PM

All replies

  • "RSustar" wrote in message news:e62a82f1-2c9f-4120-a879-12a15b5ac971...

    Purchased computer from HP directly online mid Jan 2011.

    Intel Core I7-2600 3.4ghz, 8 gb RAM, integrated everything except video card. On board video is disabled and the system shipped with an Nvidia GeForce GT440 card.

    Shortly after I was notified that the motherboard was affected by the Intel 6 Series Chipset recall and that the entire motheboard would need to be replaced. The motherboard was replaced in home by a technician dispatched directly from HP. The motherboard arrived via FedEX overnight directly from HP before the technician arrived. The HP technician replaced the motherboard near the end of April 2011, so just over a month and a half ago (about 45 days). Everything seemed fine after the replacement until yesterday when the desktop went black and there are now indicators stating that the Windows 7 is not genuine. If I try to activate, Windows says that the product key is invalid. At the end of this message is my MGAdiag output. I started to look around and it appears that my bios no longer contains any product specific informaiton. My computer serial number, product ID's and hardware ID's are all blank. Looking at the MGAdiag ouput, it appears that my new HP motherboard does not have a SLIC table. It appears that maybe when the motherboard was replaced, it contained only generic bios information and does not include the same product specific information that the original motherboard had. I tried the recovery CD's from HP, but the installation says that the discs are not valid on my hardware.

    Can you validate the activation issue? Do I need HP to update my bios? Am I missing the proper SLIC table? I have debated using the COA number on the side of the case, but the fact that the recovery CD's would concern me if I have issues down the road.

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    Windows Validation Data-->

    Validation Code: 50
    Cached Online Validation Code: 0x0
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-73CQT-WMF7J-3Q6C9
    Windows Product Key Hash: KaFG+RmurcM3ZxzWyfEP9WtPUJw=
    Windows Product ID: 00359-OEM-8992687-00010
    Windows Product ID Type: 2
    Windows License Type: OEM SLP
    Windows OS version: 6.1.7600.2.00010300.0.0.003

    Other data-->
    SYSTEM><Manufacturer>Hewlett-Packard</Manufacturer><Model>SLIC-CPC</Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>AMI</Manufacturer><Version>7.09</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="6"/><Date>20110225000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS>

    Licensing Data-->
    Software licensing service version: 6.1.7600.16385

    Name: Windows(R) 7, HomePremium edition
    Description: Windows Operating System - Windows(R) 7, OEM_SLP channel
    Partial Product Key: 3Q6C9
    License Status: Notification
    Notification Reason: 0xC004F057.

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->
    BIOS valid for OA 2.0: yes, but no SLIC table
    Windows marker version: N/A

     

     


    It looks to me as if HO installed  the BIOS with a version that is not properly Win7-compliant.
    You need to check with HP to see if they have a compliant version that includes what you need - it should be on their website.
    If not, then change the Product Key to the one on your COA sticker, using the Change Product Key link at the bottom of the System Properties page.
    Please note also that your installation of Office Pro Plus is a version that is only sold as Volume License - not to the general public through retail outlets. If you bought this copy retail, it's a counterfeit.

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Sunday, June 5, 2011 5:55 PM
    Moderator
  • My version of Office Pro was purchased through Cleveland State University as part Academic Student Select Agreement . I am currently still a student at Cleveland State University and therefore this license is legitimate.

    http://www.csuohio.edu/offices/ist/shoppingpcs/software.html

    Like I said, I have considered using the COA sticker, but fixing the validation in this manner would leave me without usable back-up media. The HP system recovery disk will reset the license to the OEM SLP license if I have to re-install in the future. Right now, the HP recovery disk which contains my only physical copy of Windows 7 will not even load because the install says that this disk is not valid for my system. At this point,

    As for the system bios, the BIOS revision on the replacement motherboard is the same as the original motherboard. HP has not released updated BIOS firmware and HP does not publish the current firmware. By biggest concern is that the line

    BIOS valid for OA 2.0: yes, but no SLIC table.

    Is this likely the issue? Does my bios not contain a SLIC table. I do not know much about the SLIC table or the SLP activation, but my replacement mother board BIOS is missing every unique identifier about my computer (product name, serial #, SKU Number, Feature Byte, and Build ID are all blank in the Bios).

    Is it reasonable to try to have HP fix my bios? Am I on track that my recovery media will not work if the SLP activation is not working?

    Really, all i am looking to confirm is that my activation issue is a result of a BIOS issue. If that is the case, I will take up the issue with HP.

    Sunday, June 5, 2011 8:13 PM
  • "RSustar" wrote in message news:2edf41f2-b17b-41e0-aa81-b8947f75068a...

    My version of Office Pro was purchased through Cleveland State University as part Academic Student Select Agreement . I am currently still a student at Cleveland State University and therefore this license is legitimate.

    http://www.csuohio.edu/offices/ist/shoppingpcs/software.html

    Like I said, I have considered using the COA sticker, but fixing the validation in this manner would leave me without usable back-up media. The HP system recovery disk will reset the license to the OEM SLP license if I have to re-install in the future. Right now, the HP recovery disk which contains my only physical copy of Windows 7 will not even load because the install says that this disk is not valid for my system. At this point,

    As for the system bios, the BIOS revision on the replacement motherboard is the same as the original motherboard. HP has not released updated BIOS firmware and HP does not publish the current firmware. By biggest concern is that the line

    BIOS valid for OA 2.0: yes, but no SLIC table.

    Is this likely the issue? Does my bios not contain a SLIC table. I do not know much about the SLIC table or the SLP activation, but my replacement mother board BIOS is missing every unique identifier about my computer (product name, serial #, SKU Number, Feature Byte, and Build ID are all blank in the Bios).

    Is it reasonable to try to have HP fix my bios? Am I on track that my recovery media will not work if the SLP activation is not working?

    Really, all i am looking to confirm is that my activation issue is a result of a BIOS issue. If that is the case, I will take up the issue with HP.


    Yes - the whole problem is a result of the BIOS SLIC Table. It's definitely worth badgering them about this as all their other replacements are likely to be suffering the same way. It's a problem they should have foreseen and done something about before sending out the boards.
     
    I don't understand your comment about 'fixing the validation in this manner would leave me without usable back-up media' - it has no bearing on the backup media required - you should be able to reinstall using the Recovery system, or the Disks created from it. You could also install using the COA Key and any Win7 Retail disk or OEM System Builder disk (simply borrow one from a friend and make a copy)
     
    The Recovery System will still install the OS whatever the BIOS - it simply will not activate unless the SLIC table is correct for the OS and the OEM, so you would have 30 days in which to change it to the COA Key instead. (make sure that you make a note of the key somewhere safe!)
     
     
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Sunday, June 5, 2011 8:36 PM
    Moderator
  • My comment regarding the fixing the validation using the COA Key is in reference to making it appear that the issue is solved, when the root cause still exists. It appears that invalid or incomplete BIOS information is prohibitting me from validating windows and running the recovery disk. HP's recovery disk must be looking for something in the BIOS which does not exist. If I fix the issue using the COA key, then I won't have a validation issue and I will only have a potential problem with the BIOS.

    HP customer support won't put much effort into a potential problem.

    Thanks for the info

    Sunday, June 5, 2011 8:48 PM
  • "RSustar" wrote in message news:27e96eb4-2f81-408d-83f9-bba07215109a...

    My comment regarding the fixing the validation using the COA Key is in reference to making it appear that the issue is solved, when the root cause still exists. It appears that invalid or incomplete BIOS information is prohibitting me from validating windows and running the recovery disk. HP's recovery disk must be looking for something in the BIOS which does not exist. If I fix the issue using the COA key, then I won't have a validation issue and I will only have a potential problem with the BIOS.

    HP customer support won't put much effort into a potential problem.

    Thanks for the info


    Using The COA Key removes the need for the BIOS SLIC table completely.
    It would be unusual for a manufacturer's recovery set to actively check the BIOS before installation, but not unheard of (Dell used to do it - but I don't believe they do any longer) for precisely the reasons you're discovering now.
     
    Go batter HP's collective heads against the nearest brick wall until they cough up a new BIOS! <g>
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Sunday, June 5, 2011 9:11 PM
    Moderator
  • To further explain how the OEM Product keys and Bios Flags work:

     

    Computers, which are built by large manufactures that come with Windows Pre-Installed, come with two (2) Product Keys:

    A)   OEM SLP: This key comes pre-installed in Windows, when it comes from the Factory. This key is geared to work with the OEM Bios Flag found only on that Manufacturer's computer hardware. So when Windows was installed using the OEM SLP key (at the factory) Windows looks at the motherboard and sees the proper OEM Bios Flag (for that Manufacturer and that version of Windows) and Self-Activates.

     

    B)    COA SLP: This is the Product key that you see on the sticker on the side (or bottom) of your computer. It is a valid product key, but should only be used in limited situations (such as if the OEM SLP key stops self-activating for whatever reason...including invalid or incomplete BIOS). The key must be activated by Phone.

     

      The CoA SLP key is provided as a Backup just in case of such an issue as you are experiencing.


    Darin MS
    Monday, June 6, 2011 8:37 PM