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I suppose I should use the search bar; anyway, my foot in the door with development. Come one come all. RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello one and all!

    My name is Tyler!

    I come to you good folks with a generally broad question!

    Get ready, for I am about to type and type my little heart out. I sure hope there isn't a hidden character count!


    #1: Where do I start?!

     About me: 

    I am 19 years old, and currently living the lovely college life without the college.

    That means paycheck to paycheck; doing nothing to further myself, and getting drunk. (not to often, in fact, it has been months! I mentioned that to further my college life statement) and paying my dues blending into a crowd.

    I then proceeded to Google something and, err, I mean Bing'd it.. Bung it? Bingededed? Hmm..

    So, I Googled that, right?

    And I thought, "Hey! i like computers, i can do that i bet. i am sure i will make 150k drive a lexus and demand i get discounts like the bulk of microsoftians."

    Alright, more along of the lines of:

    I started playing a popular MMORPG online back in the day, 4th grade?

    Runescape!

    after playing for several years, I found my way onto private servers, where I looked into the open-source option they provided.

    it instantly caught my attention! I later found myself doing hours and hours of research trying to expand my knowledge; more if ands or buts!

    I then continued my way through my life, until age 17, where I then moved into Redmond, Wa.

    Right on 40th and 148th; across the street from Microsoft; coming from Montana it was an impressive campus! It is destiny I thought, put myself across the street! I have since then done research upon taking a more professional approach to obtaining a entry level spot.

    and what I have gathered from many (50+) social media sources.

    long and behold the obvious; go to school.

    (I understand you don't NEED a degree; and many GREAT programmers are self taught, but, it seem's like a more approachable situation)

    So, I took that, looked around; and ended up being enrolled at Lake Washington Tech for their Software Development program.

    This will provide the following:

    A) transferable credits

    B) entry into development

    C) Certification of proficiency

    another question I have:

    2#: Is a Certification of proficiency worth my money? (roughly $8,000-12,000)

    Will this land me anything in a real world situation?(assuming I am not an idiot walking in thinking I get a 60k desk job, and legitimately know my work; although, from what I read a solid skill level is valid with or without papers to prove so?)

    3# What route would you all suggest I take? (stop typing overdrawn forum postings and start coding; right?)

    Thank you all many in advance!

    Wish to see you all soon.

     :D

    **no review was done

    Wednesday, August 7, 2013 11:53 PM

Answers

  • Okay, since the question has been bumped up in the forum, I'll bite and try to provide some answers.

    First of all, Tyler, if you want to become a programmer, you will need to learn how to program well. It *is* possible to learn it by yourself by reading books if you have the ability, inclination and dedication. But it is easier to learn it in class if you take a proper course, like apparently you have already decided to do.

    If you want to supplement your college training with someting that will give you a further advantage when seeking a job, get an industry certification. Since you asked in a Microsoft forum, I will of course recommend a Microsoft cerification such as MCSD (Microsoft Certified Solutions Developer). See http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en-us/mcsd-certification.aspx .

    I notice that you are a good writer. Your thoughts are clear, expressed in an orderly way, using good grammar and spelling, and you even throw in a funny comment here and there. This is an unusual ability; therefore, one thing I suggest is that you do some writing. Once you become sufficiently proficient at programming, write some articles and publish them wherever you can (blogs, magazines). This will give you some prestige and will look good in your CV. At some point you may even consider writing training courses, which pays reasonalbly well (but not writing books, these will give you recognition but the small amount of money they will bring in does not compensate the effort).

    I wish you good luck in you endeavor, and hope you enjoy working as a software developer.

    Sunday, September 15, 2013 7:29 AM

All replies

  • Come one come all!

    I am so ency to read all replies!

    Sitting here smashing refresh, just waiting.

    This may be a forum post, but, damn! This is life altering things here!

    I have found something I want to make a career of!

    :DD

    Thursday, August 8, 2013 12:09 AM
  • Up in the forum list

    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    MCSE:Server Infrastructure, MCSE:Desktop Infrastructure, MCSA Server 2012, Citrix CCIA & CCEE, Cisco CCNA, VMware VCP 3/4/5 Twitter: @dnyvandam http://www.dannyvandam.net


    Friday, September 13, 2013 1:52 PM
    Moderator
  • Okay, since the question has been bumped up in the forum, I'll bite and try to provide some answers.

    First of all, Tyler, if you want to become a programmer, you will need to learn how to program well. It *is* possible to learn it by yourself by reading books if you have the ability, inclination and dedication. But it is easier to learn it in class if you take a proper course, like apparently you have already decided to do.

    If you want to supplement your college training with someting that will give you a further advantage when seeking a job, get an industry certification. Since you asked in a Microsoft forum, I will of course recommend a Microsoft cerification such as MCSD (Microsoft Certified Solutions Developer). See http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en-us/mcsd-certification.aspx .

    I notice that you are a good writer. Your thoughts are clear, expressed in an orderly way, using good grammar and spelling, and you even throw in a funny comment here and there. This is an unusual ability; therefore, one thing I suggest is that you do some writing. Once you become sufficiently proficient at programming, write some articles and publish them wherever you can (blogs, magazines). This will give you some prestige and will look good in your CV. At some point you may even consider writing training courses, which pays reasonalbly well (but not writing books, these will give you recognition but the small amount of money they will bring in does not compensate the effort).

    I wish you good luck in you endeavor, and hope you enjoy working as a software developer.

    Sunday, September 15, 2013 7:29 AM