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Can you turn a WHS appliance OFF? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Can you turn a WHS appliance on and off, daily?  If the primary use is backup, this would be desirable.  Can the backup software be scheduled? 
    Friday, December 14, 2007 2:57 PM

Answers

  • Evening,

    In principle, yes. However, there are a few caveats, while the backup schedule can be set at any time you want - default is 0000 to 0600 daily -, there are other functions that the server will need to do. The Demigrator function works, slowly, in the background as does the folder duplication and housekeeping functions. Therefore, keeping the system off apart from the backup period won't allow the system to perform properly, as they cannot be scheduled.

    I'm sure that switching it off, say, for daylight hours, and then letting the server perform it's functions and backups during the night, would work quite well.

    The disks can be set to power down etc and you can set the power management as well.

    However, you will be denying one of the other aspects of the server, which is remote access and the RDP operations.

     

    Personally, I figure a better bet, in the long run, is to build on a low power efficient system and just let it 'do it's thing'.

     

    Colin

    Friday, December 14, 2007 5:32 PM

All replies

  • Evening,

    In principle, yes. However, there are a few caveats, while the backup schedule can be set at any time you want - default is 0000 to 0600 daily -, there are other functions that the server will need to do. The Demigrator function works, slowly, in the background as does the folder duplication and housekeeping functions. Therefore, keeping the system off apart from the backup period won't allow the system to perform properly, as they cannot be scheduled.

    I'm sure that switching it off, say, for daylight hours, and then letting the server perform it's functions and backups during the night, would work quite well.

    The disks can be set to power down etc and you can set the power management as well.

    However, you will be denying one of the other aspects of the server, which is remote access and the RDP operations.

     

    Personally, I figure a better bet, in the long run, is to build on a low power efficient system and just let it 'do it's thing'.

     

    Colin

    Friday, December 14, 2007 5:32 PM
  • I read one review that stated that turing WHS off caused his comcast high speed cable modem to crash, and caused other problems with his client computers.  I would like to verifiy if this is true, in general.  If WHS is shut down, would internet access be terminated?  Would the home network work normally?  Finally where do you back up the server?
    Friday, December 14, 2007 7:42 PM
  • I think the review must have had a very strange setup!

    If the network is set up correctly, the fact that the server is on or off will be of no consequence. However, as most(?) people have re-directed their Documents - Photos- User folders to the Server, it could mean that shutting down the server would mean no access to these folders, but if nothing has been re-directed, or the clients don't need access to the sever, then, again, the server being on or off is irrelevant to the home network and Internet access.

    It depends on what you mean by 'back up the server' The server is there to back up your clients - giving you duplication of client data and systems. The user data that is stored in the server User Folders - as long as you have two hard drives, or more - will be duplicated across the hard drives assuming folder duplication is enabled. This means a failed drive can just be replaced and the data is then re-built automatically.

    As the vast majority of people who will buy a Home Server currently have no backup of their home computers, this will provide the means of giving some safety.

    If you mean back up  the server itself, there are numerous methods, both free and paid for, that the IT literate can employ, but as of yet, Microsoft hasn't included a method of backing up the backups, they are however, working on including it at some point.

     

    Colin

     

    Friday, December 14, 2007 8:34 PM
  •  Nantucketbob wrote:
    I read one review that stated that turing WHS off caused his comcast high speed cable modem to crash, and caused other problems with his client computers.
    Can you provide a link to that review, or tell me where it appeared in print?

    Thanks!
    Friday, December 14, 2007 8:43 PM
    Moderator
  • Go to newegg.com, search for windows home server.  The OEM version is now available.  Search the reviews; it is pretty close to the top, one of the very few with a one or two-star rating.  (Of the 50 or so reviews, almost all are 5-stars.)
    Friday, December 14, 2007 9:19 PM
  • I think this answers my question.  I should not have asked the backup question!  For my backup needs I think I will go with a NAS (network available storage), perhaps using linux (oh no, can I use that word here?).  All my computers have duplicate drives and backup software.  The real issue is that hard drives are "on" (spinning) all the time, and they die.  If they can be turned off, really off, when not in use, that is a good thing, saving energy and protecting data.  Hard drive storage seems the best option until terabyte DVDs are available.

    Being able to see my photos on my wide-screen TV is getting to be important (I am anxious to sell my superb slide projectors).  It would be nice for my kids to upload their photos to me, and visa versa, easily, the Remote desktop feature.   WHS seems like a good idea.  I was hoping to combine WHS with a huge raid affair, but that does not seem like something that is nicely compatible. 

    I should clarify something.  I am a photographer ; my camera takes 12+Mb RAW files.  Photoshop files are sometimes 50Mb each, and I have lots of them for each customer.  I need multiple terabyte backup.  That's why I will probably go with a NAS device.  I presume that device would be reconginzed by WHS. 
    Friday, December 14, 2007 9:33 PM
  • If by "recognized" you mean that you can copy files to and from a NAS, then yes. If you mean that WHS will treat the NAS as part of it's storage pool, no.

    That "reviewer" doesn't appear to have had a very good time with WHS. Smile But somehow I get the impression that he was expecting to be disappointed, for whatever reason, and that's not a good attitude to go into something new with. Plus he certainly didn't seek assistance here, because I'm pretty sure that there's at least one factual error in that review.
    Friday, December 14, 2007 10:02 PM
    Moderator
  • I agree with the 'build an efficient server in the first place' option, even though to a large extent it does go against my environmental interests.

     

    A basic 2-disk machine will still consume around 70w at idle, but when properly idle (with the disks in sleep mode) that should reduce to around 45w.

    Friday, December 14, 2007 10:47 PM