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Gigabit connectivity RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi all,

    Not sure if this is WHS, but as its at the forefront of my network, it needs to be sorted on this device first.

    I have Cable internet (50meg) that then goes into a WNR2000 wireless router (now this router only has a 4 port 100mb switch) so I bought a Gigabit switch and installed it after the router.

    and my WHS and main pc is connected to this Gigabit switch (both show as gigabit) and I have manually set both Gigabit NICs manually to Gigabit full duplex (now when I transfer files between the main PC and the WHS im lucky to get 50meg per second)

    andyone have any ideas how to get it to Gigabit?

    Sunday, July 11, 2010 3:20 PM

All replies

  • Hi all,

    Not sure if this is WHS, but as its at the forefront of my network, it needs to be sorted on this device first.

    I have Cable internet (50meg) that then goes into a WNR2000 wireless router (now this router only has a 4 port 100mb switch) so I bought a Gigabit switch and installed it after the router.

    and my WHS and main pc is connected to this Gigabit switch (both show as gigabit) and I have manually set both Gigabit NICs manually to Gigabit full duplex (now when I transfer files between the main PC and the WHS im lucky to get 50meg per second)

    andyone have any ideas how to get it to Gigabit?

    Please be specific.  What is the exact speed measurement you get when transferring files?  Is it Mb/sec (megabits per second) or MB/sec (megabytes per second)?   "Meg" doesn't mean anything.
    Sunday, July 11, 2010 5:47 PM
    Moderator
  • Sorry, megabyte

    I usually get roughly 20 megabytes per second when transferring files (but occasionally it will do 50 megabytes)

    All the cables are CAT5e

    Monday, July 12, 2010 11:27 AM
  • 20 MB/s = 200 Mb/s = 20% bandwidth utilization on Gb Ethernet. That's not all that bad, and is likely limited by bottlenecks other than network. Do you have any USB drives in server storage? USB delivers pretty poor performance for mass storage...
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Monday, July 12, 2010 12:23 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi Ken,

    No USB drives no, I know that 80MB/s is Gigabit, and I would be happy with that, but at an average of 20MB/s thats not great when moving bulky files.

    Monday, July 12, 2010 12:38 PM
  • You won't see 80 MB/s in the real world for more than a moment, other than with network testing tools that are capable of using 100% of the available bandwidth (and probably not even then; consumer NICs including those on your motherboard are pretty poor performers). You can try some additional tuning of networking parameters throughout your network; that may result in better performance. If all of your hardware supports jumbo frames, and you can find a frame size that everything has in common, that would be the place to start. But I'll warn you that you may find this pretty frustrating; we can't tell you how to tune your network for your use so you're going to have to learn a lot about network tuning.

    Also, overhead of all sorts will reduce maximum throughput. As will bottlenecks other than your theoretical bandwidth cap (1000Mb/s in this case); particularly with inexpensive NICs that do all the work in the drivers and transfer everything over the PCI bus to the wire, 20-30MB/s is pretty decent performance. I generally use Intel PRO/1000 NICs for a reason, and even there, with everything tuned for good performance and reliable connections, I usually never see more than 35-40 MB/s. Even that's only in rather specialized situations; file transfers will usually top out at somewhere in the neighborhood of 25-30 MB/s.

    And finally, how often do you move extremely large files? Can you do it during off hours, or start large transfers before you go to bed? Then you won't care that transferring a 10 GB file takes 10 minutes. :) If you're shipping large files around your home network you really should learn something about tuning your network for that use; it's not a typical home scenario.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Monday, July 12, 2010 1:46 PM
    Moderator
  • Ken,

    I have done all of what you have suggested. In all honesty my network is slightly larger than the general 'home' scenario as I have a number of servers primarily used for folding at home. I often move software around thats quite bulky and I use my WHS to store it all as its backed up.

    very frustrating when I constatly need to move software.

     

    Thanks for your help Ken, i'll do somemore research

    Monday, July 12, 2010 2:57 PM
  • Also multiple devices on your network causing traffic will reduce the bandwidth, which is available to the single connection. Cable quality may matter (if you got not Gigabit Full Duplex on your server offered automatically, this or low quality plugs may be a reason, since Server 2003 does a quality check), security software etc.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf

    Tuesday, July 13, 2010 10:10 AM
    Moderator
  •  On 7/13/2010 5:10 AM, Olaf Engelke [MVP] wrote:

    Also multiple devices on your network causing traffic will reduce the bandwidth, which is available to the single connection. Cable quality may matter (if you got not Gigabit Full Duplex on your server offered automatically, this or low quality plugs may be a reason, since Server 2003 does a quality check), security software etc.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf

    Something that helped me with a slightly different problem (and kind of goes along with what Ken was saying) is that I went into Device Manager, and opened the Properties of my NIC (on my server through Remote Desktop Connection and my Desktop).  I clicked on the Advanced Tab, and changed it from Auto Sensing to 100mb_Full Duplex (I'm on a 100mbit connection), enabled store and forward, and set the packet size lower than 512 kilobytes (I set it to 256 on one NIC and 64 on the other, since that was the only choice).

    Like Ken said, you'll have to figure out what works best for you.  The one thing that I did that I would suggest is turning of the auto sensing and set it to whatever the maximum that works is (1Gbit full duplex, 1Gbit half duplex, 100 Mbit full......)  And as I mentioned already, I had a slightly different problem (collisions on my network and link failures).

    Have a great day:)
    Patrick.


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    Smile.. Someone out there cares deeply for you.
    Wednesday, July 14, 2010 5:28 PM