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Have installation cd's but no product key

    Question

  • Hi team,

     

    I recently purchased a bunch of old pc's from a printing business and they all came with cd's and product keys (mostly win98 and ME). Some of the PC's were damaged ie bad boot sectors on hdd and faulty motherboards etc so they had thrown them out. INcluded was one pc which had xp pro version 2002 on it. The product key was recorded in most of the other pc booklets but not this one. So the product key was crushed in some metal recycling place.

    The pc was registered to Tablet Print in Dunedin, New Zealand which has recently closed down.

    What can I do to retrieve the product key so I can load it onto one of the 'reconstructed' pc's that had an older version of windows on it? It has the resources to handle XP operating system.

    Your assistance would be appreciated

    If it helps this is the number printed on the readable side of the cd on the clear plastic inner sleeve. xo8-54029 (ES.01)

     

    CHeers

    Mark

    Tuesday, June 05, 2007 1:46 AM

Answers

  • Mrt69,

     

    An OEM license for Windows XP is valid only on the computer onto which the license is first installed and cannot be moved to another computer.  When the computer is retired or otherwise no longer in service, that particlar license also is retired and is no longer valid.

     

    Therefore, it would be a violation of the OEM End User Licening Agreement to install the OEM license from a junked or retired computer onto any other computer.

    Tuesday, June 05, 2007 2:18 AM
  • How to replace lost, broken, or missing Microsoft software or hardware
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/326246/en-us

    Tuesday, June 05, 2007 2:11 AM
    Moderator
  • What happens then when a hard drive finally 'wears' out or is upgraded to a larger size hdd...and the OS has to be reinstalled...are you saying that another license has to be purchased each time this is done?...the same applies when the mother board and processor etc have been upgraded...whats the story then?
    Tuesday, June 05, 2007 5:35 AM
  • Mrt69,

     

    For OEM licenses:  No new license needed for any hardware replaced because it became defective.  New license needed when a motherboard is replaced in order to upgrade, ie, to gain new performance, features, or function.

     

    Here is a fuller explanation that I posted previously:

     

    There are two types of licenses for XP that consumers will encounter, retail (aka full packaged product), and OEM (original equipment manufacturer).

    Retail licenses may be moved from one computer to another, as long as the license is activated on one computer at a time and as long as the previous installation of the license is removed from the previously licensed computer.

    OEM licenses for XP are tied to the first computer onto which they are installed and the license is NOT permitted to be moved to any other computer.  For the purposes of defining what a computer is, since a computer is really just a collection of parts, Microsoft has established that the motherboard is the base or "defining" component, and the OEM license is permanently tied to the motherboard.

    There is one exception, the case of a defective motherboard.  If a motheboard becomes defective, you are of course permitted to change it and reinstall your OEM XP license to it.  For reasons stated below, if at all possible, you should replace it with and identical board or the manufacturer's designated replacement.

    The details become sticky when the license was obtained thru a major manufacturer that uses system-lock pre-install (SLP) technology, which sets the recovery or repair CD to look for certain bits in the BIOS of the official manufacturer's motherboards.  If such bits are not found, as they would not be if you replaced the defective board with one not from the original computer manufacturer, then the CD will refuse to install XP.  The correct thing to do in these cases is to install XP using a genuine systembuilder/OEM MS XP CDROM, which does not have the SLP technology.  However, when installing, be sure to use the Product Key on the Certificate of Authenticity affixed to the computer, and NOT the Product Key that came with the CD. (Note that retail and Volume License CDs will NOT accept OEM product keys, returning an "invalid product key" error.)  Finally, when installation is complete, do a Telephonic Activation because the OEM PK on the COA will not be accepted by the automated online activation system.  If the automated telephone system also refuses activation, choose the option to speak with an activation rep and explain that you are replacing a defective motherboard and cannot use the manufacturer-supplied recovery CDs.

    One does not "lose their license" for XP if the motherboard becomes defective and has to be replaced.  If the computer owner chooses to use, or because of availablity is forced to use, a board that is not a direct or identical replacement, there has to be a mechanism to accommodate these circumstances, and that is why a telephonic activation is authorized.

    Note that if the computer owner decides to replace the motherboard for performance reasons or to add features or new technology, the defective exception is NOT applicable and a new license for XP is required to be purchased.


    Tuesday, June 05, 2007 8:19 PM
  • To activate Windows 8.1 using an Internet connection:

    1. Select the Start button , type PC settings, and then select PC settings from the list of results.
    2. Choose Activate Windows.
    3. Type your Windows 8.1 product key, select Next, and follow the instructions.

    To activate Windows 8.1 using the phone:

    1. Select the Start button , enter PC settings, and then select PC settings from the list of results.
    2. Select Activate Windows, and then select Contact customer support for help.
       (You may be asked for an admin password or to confirm your choice)
    3. Select your location (or the location nearest you) from the drop-down list, and then select Next.
    4. Call one of the available phone numbers listed. An automated system will guide you through the activation process.

    Carey Frisch


    Monday, August 21, 2017 4:10 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • How to replace lost, broken, or missing Microsoft software or hardware
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/326246/en-us

    Tuesday, June 05, 2007 2:11 AM
    Moderator
  • Mrt69,

     

    An OEM license for Windows XP is valid only on the computer onto which the license is first installed and cannot be moved to another computer.  When the computer is retired or otherwise no longer in service, that particlar license also is retired and is no longer valid.

     

    Therefore, it would be a violation of the OEM End User Licening Agreement to install the OEM license from a junked or retired computer onto any other computer.

    Tuesday, June 05, 2007 2:18 AM
  • What happens then when a hard drive finally 'wears' out or is upgraded to a larger size hdd...and the OS has to be reinstalled...are you saying that another license has to be purchased each time this is done?...the same applies when the mother board and processor etc have been upgraded...whats the story then?
    Tuesday, June 05, 2007 5:35 AM
  • Mrt69,

     

    For OEM licenses:  No new license needed for any hardware replaced because it became defective.  New license needed when a motherboard is replaced in order to upgrade, ie, to gain new performance, features, or function.

     

    Here is a fuller explanation that I posted previously:

     

    There are two types of licenses for XP that consumers will encounter, retail (aka full packaged product), and OEM (original equipment manufacturer).

    Retail licenses may be moved from one computer to another, as long as the license is activated on one computer at a time and as long as the previous installation of the license is removed from the previously licensed computer.

    OEM licenses for XP are tied to the first computer onto which they are installed and the license is NOT permitted to be moved to any other computer.  For the purposes of defining what a computer is, since a computer is really just a collection of parts, Microsoft has established that the motherboard is the base or "defining" component, and the OEM license is permanently tied to the motherboard.

    There is one exception, the case of a defective motherboard.  If a motheboard becomes defective, you are of course permitted to change it and reinstall your OEM XP license to it.  For reasons stated below, if at all possible, you should replace it with and identical board or the manufacturer's designated replacement.

    The details become sticky when the license was obtained thru a major manufacturer that uses system-lock pre-install (SLP) technology, which sets the recovery or repair CD to look for certain bits in the BIOS of the official manufacturer's motherboards.  If such bits are not found, as they would not be if you replaced the defective board with one not from the original computer manufacturer, then the CD will refuse to install XP.  The correct thing to do in these cases is to install XP using a genuine systembuilder/OEM MS XP CDROM, which does not have the SLP technology.  However, when installing, be sure to use the Product Key on the Certificate of Authenticity affixed to the computer, and NOT the Product Key that came with the CD. (Note that retail and Volume License CDs will NOT accept OEM product keys, returning an "invalid product key" error.)  Finally, when installation is complete, do a Telephonic Activation because the OEM PK on the COA will not be accepted by the automated online activation system.  If the automated telephone system also refuses activation, choose the option to speak with an activation rep and explain that you are replacing a defective motherboard and cannot use the manufacturer-supplied recovery CDs.

    One does not "lose their license" for XP if the motherboard becomes defective and has to be replaced.  If the computer owner chooses to use, or because of availablity is forced to use, a board that is not a direct or identical replacement, there has to be a mechanism to accommodate these circumstances, and that is why a telephonic activation is authorized.

    Note that if the computer owner decides to replace the motherboard for performance reasons or to add features or new technology, the defective exception is NOT applicable and a new license for XP is required to be purchased.


    Tuesday, June 05, 2007 8:19 PM
  • how to activat window 8.1 

    Sunday, August 20, 2017 9:58 AM
  • i have new product keys plzz

    Sunday, August 20, 2017 9:59 AM
  • To activate Windows 8.1 using an Internet connection:

    1. Select the Start button , type PC settings, and then select PC settings from the list of results.
    2. Choose Activate Windows.
    3. Type your Windows 8.1 product key, select Next, and follow the instructions.

    To activate Windows 8.1 using the phone:

    1. Select the Start button , enter PC settings, and then select PC settings from the list of results.
    2. Select Activate Windows, and then select Contact customer support for help.
       (You may be asked for an admin password or to confirm your choice)
    3. Select your location (or the location nearest you) from the drop-down list, and then select Next.
    4. Call one of the available phone numbers listed. An automated system will guide you through the activation process.

    Carey Frisch


    Monday, August 21, 2017 4:10 AM
    Moderator