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Process for handling service account password expiry RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a CRM 2011 installation where there is a policy in place that passwords on active directory user accounts are expired regularly on a quarterly basis.  This is fine for normal users, but for service accounts used by the CRM installation (web site, asyc service, etc), this will obviously be a problem and make services stop working when their passwords expire. Several CRM installation pages on technet (1, 2, 3) for the various service accounts in use make the following statement on handling password expiry for service accounts:

    • Ensure the password for this account is not set to expire or a process in place to manage the password changes if you have a password expiration policy.

    Excluding the accounts from the password expiry policy is easy to do - uncheck the password expiry checkbox on the active directory user accounts.  I'm looking for guidance/examples on the "process in place to manage the password changes" option. I shudder at the thought of someone having to knowingly go and reset the password prior to its expiry on each service account, and then go to each application and re-enter in the new password.  To me, this would be a bad process that's highly error prone and easily forgotten and not followed.

    Are there any processes that people have found that work and are simple and easy to maintain?

    Tuesday, May 29, 2012 5:00 PM

Answers

  • The best would be to leverage "Managed Services Accounts" for the technologies that support it (IIS Application Pools, SQL Server): 

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd378925(v=ws.10).aspx

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff641729(v=ws.10).aspx

    If I remember correctly, the downside is that Managed Services Accounts will only work for Windows Services in Windows Server 2012: 

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh831451.aspx

    So for the moment, I would also recommend going with different low privilege domain account for each services. Use a very strong password for those accounts and don't make them expire. 

    Our best practice is to follow the "Minimum permissions required for Microsoft Dynamics CRM Setup, services, and components":

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh699825.aspx

    That being said, changing passwords isn't such a big deal if you have the process in places: A few clients I have change all admin passwords every 4 months and every time a system admin leaves the company :) They simply test the process before doing it in production, document the process, repeat the process, validate and so on. 

    Hope this helps, and if it does, feel free to vote as helpful. 

    Max




    • Edited by MaximeFortier Wednesday, August 15, 2012 12:23 PM
    • Marked as answer by Alan.M Thursday, May 21, 2015 12:04 AM
    Wednesday, August 15, 2012 12:13 PM

All replies

  • hi,

    as MS has mentioned to have different AD accounts to run different services and one for the MS CRM Admin.

    All the users password should not expire.

    cause, we have the services running and also the deployment manager will run also we need the admin account for import and export customizations and also we used to use the account in our interface application with other systems.

    So you can request your AD admin that this is not a user account i mean none of the users will use it and it will not have a mail account etc.

    So they can create it as a special account in the AD.

    else its very difficult to change the password in each time, just it will expire and at the same time you have to remember the password so that you can change back to the same password . else you have to change the password all through out the interface applicatons you have used for authentication for the MS CRM.

    Regards,

    yes.sudhanshu


    yes.sudhanshu

    http://bproud2banindian.blogspot.com
    http://ms-crm-2011-beta.blogspot.com

    Wednesday, August 15, 2012 2:47 AM
  • The best would be to leverage "Managed Services Accounts" for the technologies that support it (IIS Application Pools, SQL Server): 

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd378925(v=ws.10).aspx

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff641729(v=ws.10).aspx

    If I remember correctly, the downside is that Managed Services Accounts will only work for Windows Services in Windows Server 2012: 

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh831451.aspx

    So for the moment, I would also recommend going with different low privilege domain account for each services. Use a very strong password for those accounts and don't make them expire. 

    Our best practice is to follow the "Minimum permissions required for Microsoft Dynamics CRM Setup, services, and components":

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh699825.aspx

    That being said, changing passwords isn't such a big deal if you have the process in places: A few clients I have change all admin passwords every 4 months and every time a system admin leaves the company :) They simply test the process before doing it in production, document the process, repeat the process, validate and so on. 

    Hope this helps, and if it does, feel free to vote as helpful. 

    Max




    • Edited by MaximeFortier Wednesday, August 15, 2012 12:23 PM
    • Marked as answer by Alan.M Thursday, May 21, 2015 12:04 AM
    Wednesday, August 15, 2012 12:13 PM