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Running Backups over wireless RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have been unsuccessful with wireless backups and would be interested in knowing who has had success and who hasn't and what wireless routers people are using.
    Wednesday, February 21, 2007 3:37 AM

All replies

  • No problems with wireless backups.  Using an old Netgear 802.11g router (first generation) and the built-in Dell 802.11g wireless chipset.  Please note that from notes here, laptops won't wake up (wake on LAN) from sleep or hibernation as a wired computer will in order to start a backup.  The backup triggers correctly if the computer is on, or works correctly when started manually.
    Wednesday, February 21, 2007 5:29 AM
  • Hi all,

    From what I have read, a laptop that is plugged into DC power will WOL and backup. If it is on battery power then the connector software will not allow the initiation of a backup (lots of disk activity could potentially flatten the battery).

    I would assume (hope) that my Laptop at home, plugged into DC would WOL, even if on battery power (WOL is a server initiated request to the network card, so makes no difference if the machine is in standby or hibernate?).

    The only thing I can see is perhaps theres an option for the network card to NOT be put into standby mode? Im no expert on WOL, but I would hope a laptop on AC in standby mode allows WOL.

    cheers

    Russ

    Wednesday, February 21, 2007 7:01 AM
  • Hi,

         Have ran several successfully,manual and automatic, from my Dell e1505( Intel 3945abg) and a Linksys WRT54GX2 Wireless Router.  All worked, albeit the initial one was slow( hours;in fact.) But then did a backup of a pc that was hardwired. WOW!! is all I can say, What a difference in speed. Did about the same amount(20 gigs) in about 5 minutes. So from now on, any massive backups, or transfer of big amounts of data, like my music folder, I'm biting the bullet and plugging in a cat5 to my lappy! :-)

     

    Jeff   

    Thursday, February 22, 2007 5:15 AM
  • Yeh thats correct. If a laptop is running off DC then it will wake from sleep to do the backup and I believe will go back to sleep once the backup is done. However if the laptop is running off battery then it will not run the backup and skip that computer until the next backup, i.e the following night.
    Thursday, February 22, 2007 9:16 AM
  •  RJGowrie wrote:

    Hi all,

    From what I have read, a laptop that is plugged into DC power will WOL and backup. If it is on battery power then the connector software will not allow the initiation of a backup (lots of disk activity could potentially flatten the battery).

    I would assume (hope) that my Laptop at home, plugged into DC would WOL, even if on battery power (WOL is a server initiated request to the network card, so makes no difference if the machine is in standby or hibernate?).

    The only thing I can see is perhaps theres an option for the network card to NOT be put into standby mode? Im no expert on WOL, but I would hope a laptop on AC in standby mode allows WOL.

    cheers

    Russ

     

    It doesn't "WOL" or wake on lan.  The Windows Home Server Connector wakes the machine up for the scheduled backup then puts it back to sleep.

    Friday, February 23, 2007 1:32 AM
    Moderator
  •  jeffwhat wrote:

    Hi,

         Have ran several successfully,manual and automatic, from my Dell e1505( Intel 3945abg) and a Linksys WRT54GX2 Wireless Router.  All worked, albeit the initial one was slow( hours;in fact.) But then did a backup of a pc that was hardwired. WOW!! is all I can say, What a difference in speed. Did about the same amount(20 gigs) in about 5 minutes. So from now on, any massive backups, or transfer of big amounts of data, like my music folder, I'm biting the bullet and plugging in a cat5 to my lappy! :-)

     

    Jeff   

     

    I'm working on a FAQ about this but after the first backup, all edition backs begin to backup data faster. It is recommended to do your first backup with a wired computer to make your wireless backups happen faster.

    Friday, February 23, 2007 1:35 AM
    Moderator
  • If my problem was with a laptop I'd  for sure just hardwire it to the router for the first backup.  Unfortunately, two of the machines I'm having problems with are desktops which aren't easily moveable and I don't know if I have a network cable long enough to stretch to the router. The other thing I wonder that might be my problem is that my WHS is in yet another room with another computer and to have both connected, I have to go through a second switch. So for my wireless devices I go wireless to the router, then wired to the access point and then wired to the WHS. Could having to pass through a second switch be causing the problem? If I'm getting a temporary interrupt in the connection it must be extremely short in duration. Why isn't the WHS and the Connect client robust enough to operate through these if they are ocurring? What doesn't make sense, though, is that I have yet another computer that is wired to the router and it has to pass through the router and the switch to get to the WHS and it backs up just fine. I don't understand why mine doesn't work. I even switched to a better router with more speed than the Linksys I had.
    Friday, February 23, 2007 6:05 AM
  • Dave,

       Just takin a shot here-let me know if I'm off base- 

      Do you happen to have WPA/WPA2 turned on, with a set key rotation?

       With my  laptop; -back in the Vista beta, it had issues with my Linksys router and WPA2, every time the key spun, it would drop for a milli- second, then reconnect. (this was before WHS,but it may apply to your scenario, maybe it's dropping while trying to do a backup) The switch shouldn't be an issue-cuz you are just passing through it, and your wired pc can attest to that, cuz it's going through the same switch. 

    Jeff

    Friday, February 23, 2007 6:28 AM
  • Interesting theory. When it was the linksys I had no security turned on for the wireless and it kept failing the backups, but I had serious speed issues with it. When I went to the Netgear WPN824 I turned on the WPA. I could try turing it off, but I'm not keen on having no protection. Would I go WEP instead?
    Friday, February 23, 2007 6:51 AM
  •     I agree wholeheartedly about not dropping encryption. What eventually happened in the Vista beta was, that they fine tuned the stack,and the Linksys played nice with WPA on. Not sure, but you might want to try WEP, just to see if WPA, in fact is a possible cause, or to rule it out as an issue.

     As a side note to this, Linksys just released a firmware update for my wireless router WRT54GX2, and I upgraded it at the beginning of the week(after doing my initial backup to WHS) , and now, the issues are back. It's not playing nice with WHS or even Vista ftm.

    I'm dropping intermittently,like it was back in the beta days of Vista, but this time it's Linksys, not the Vista stack. 

    After having multiple chats with their techs, and finding out that they no longer even keep the last firmware version (which was stable) in their archives,and having the tech suggest I drop to WEP to resolve it, I'm done with them. In fact, going out right now and getting a new wireless router.

    Jeff 

    Friday, February 23, 2007 8:34 PM
  • I finally found a wireless router that works.  It's the Belkin 802.11g with MIMO (don't have the model number handy). Both my wirless desktops backed up overnight. Took a very long time but I'm guessing it had to do with having three other machines already backed up. I can just imagine the time it took searching the backup database looking for common clusters.
    Thursday, March 1, 2007 5:16 AM
  • Dave,

      Good to hear, strange though? Maybe it was the traffic, maybe interference?- On a side note-with G-you'll get 54Mbps-and my laptop took a looooong time for the initial backup too, but after that-quick. Joel posted in FAQ's about it being preferred-if possible-to do your initial backup wired-that way,depending on your NIC, you're running at 100Mbps or even 1Gbps(newer nics/routers)

     

    Jeff

    Thursday, March 1, 2007 6:20 AM
  •  Joel Burt wrote:
    It doesn't "WOL" or wake on lan.  The Windows Home Server Connector wakes the machine up for the scheduled backup then puts it back to sleep.

    Joel,

    Is this right?  I thought that the WHS Connector sets a timer in the client machine (WaitableTimer possibly?)  that expires at the backup time.  If the machine goes into hibernation before the backup, Windows sets the hardware clock to the next expiration time before turning out the lights.  When the timer expires, the clock brings the machine out of hibernation on its own, connects to WHS, and starts the backup.

    Murray

    Thursday, March 1, 2007 6:40 AM