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WHICH CERTIFICATION IS BETTER TO DO-MCSE 2003 OR MCITP? RRS feed

  • Question

  • WHICH CERTIFICATION IS BETTER - MCSE OR MCITP?
    Sunday, November 8, 2009 7:04 PM

Answers

  • Several thoughts...

    First, many companies have not migrated to Server 2008/Win7 due to legacy software issues.  The company that I work for (a large healthcare provider) has many legacy systems that will ONLY run on WinXP.  That doesn't mean that learning the latest technology (Server 2008/Windows 7) won't be of benefit.  There are quite a number of companies that have migrated to Server 2008.  Besides, if you understand Server 2008, then your knowledge is somewhat "backwards compatible" and you'd be able to handle Server 2003 in a working environment.  

    As to the MCSE 2003 "still going to be around for a long time", perhaps.  But as noted above, you're dealing with technology that is 6 to 9 years old, versus learning the latest.

    As to the recommendation for the Microsoft Certified Master program, IMHO, this is an inappropriate recommendation as this is for a seasoned IT professional, not someone that is just starting out.
    Monday, November 9, 2009 1:45 PM
    Answerer
  • "used to have a business repairing PC’s and laptops," ..... "Somebody suggested something called CompTia A+ - I think that’s the level I'm at already, but don’t know much about networks."

    From your own words, you don't need to take CompTIA A+. However, you need to cover basic networking, and CompTIA Network+ will be a good start.

    1.       What I'd really like to do is get a job with a smaller company (there are loads round here) looking after their systems. I know this is a How-long-is-a-piece-of-string question, but if you wanted to be able to walk into a business having, say, 10-100 PC’s and be reasonably competent to manage their server and network, what are the minimum Microsoft qualifications you’d want to have?

    At a minimum, you are heading straight towards MCSA. MCSA covers one module on client OS, and two modules on server and network, and one elective module.

    2.       Moving on from the basic server stuff, would I be expected to understand an email system? If it were Lotus Notes, I'd just quietly slit my wrists and leap in the river, but would MS Exchange be the next most sensible thing after the server stuff, or maybe some kind of SQL module?

    For small companies, their most common services are proxy (ISA) and email (Exchange). Whereas larger enterprises, they will have both proxy and email, and additional database (SQL). If I were targeting small companies, I’d go for ISA or Exchange. The good news is you can choose either ISA or Exchange, for the MCSA elective module.

    To summarize, you need both CompTIA Network+ and MCSA. Your other option will be to take CompTIA Network+, with MCITP – Server Administrator, with MCTS Windows Vista, with MCTS Exchange.

    Saturday, November 14, 2009 9:31 PM
  • Hi Hogweed_

    Comptia Network+ is an entry level for network beginners. It'll teach you OSI layer model, ip addressing, subnetting, how to troubleshoot common network problems using TCP/IP tools (ping, pathping, tracert, nslookup, nbtstat). At the end of it, you will understand network better.

    MCSA network module, 70-291 Implementing, Managing, and Maintaining a Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure, teaches network infrastructure in microsoft environment. It'll teach you on managing DHCP, DNS, and RAS.

    I've started from Network+, and it gives me an advantage when taking 70-291.
    Sunday, November 15, 2009 9:38 AM

All replies

  • If you search this forum, you'll find this question has been answered NUMEROUS times.  The short answer is MCITP.  The reason being is that you're learning the newer server and client systems, versus systems that are 7 to 9 years old.
    Sunday, November 8, 2009 8:13 PM
    Answerer
  • In my opinion ,it varies one to another ,
    I don't think it is good to give your advice .
    however ,I had to say ,if you are new to IT ,you can consider Mcse firstly ,
    if you have many years in some technology related with MCITP ,you can consider MCITP ,as we should keep pace with the latest technology .en I don't think I should talk much about this
    en ,the following posts may be useful for u ,or give some assitance

    mcse:best suit for green hand in IT.

    How to Upgrade MCSE/MCSA 2003 to MCITP/MCTS



    _______________________________________________________
    IT ceritificaton IT training http://www.my-dig.com
    Server 2008 OS blog http://www.microsoftbible.com
    Microsoft experience http://www.microsoftkit.com
    Monday, November 9, 2009 1:53 AM
  • In many forums, i read that mcse 2003 is still going to around for a long time or until companies start to migrate to 2008 servers.  Since i do not have any knowledge or experience in networking i.e mcse 2003, would you still recommend jumping into MCITP?

    Monday, November 9, 2009 11:00 AM
  • Hi
    Check this link

    Microsoft Certified Master is better then MCSE and MCITP, MCM is top level of certificate

    http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/master.aspx
    MCP, MCTS, MCDBA, MCSA, MCSE, MCITP, MCPD, MCT
    Monday, November 9, 2009 12:00 PM
  • Several thoughts...

    First, many companies have not migrated to Server 2008/Win7 due to legacy software issues.  The company that I work for (a large healthcare provider) has many legacy systems that will ONLY run on WinXP.  That doesn't mean that learning the latest technology (Server 2008/Windows 7) won't be of benefit.  There are quite a number of companies that have migrated to Server 2008.  Besides, if you understand Server 2008, then your knowledge is somewhat "backwards compatible" and you'd be able to handle Server 2003 in a working environment.  

    As to the MCSE 2003 "still going to be around for a long time", perhaps.  But as noted above, you're dealing with technology that is 6 to 9 years old, versus learning the latest.

    As to the recommendation for the Microsoft Certified Master program, IMHO, this is an inappropriate recommendation as this is for a seasoned IT professional, not someone that is just starting out.
    Monday, November 9, 2009 1:45 PM
    Answerer
  • Would it not better to do MCSE 2003 and then upgrade to MCITP as and when the demand rises? Correct me if I am wrong, starting out with MCSE2003 would give a broader understanding to the technology rather than starting out with MCITP for someone who has no experience? 

    Monday, November 9, 2009 7:36 PM
  • Not necessarily.  The MCITP Server 2008 Enterprise Administrator includes a client exam (Windows 7 or Vista - your choice), along with the three Server 2008 exams (Active Directory, Network Infrastructure and Applications) along with a PRO exam (basically one that covers all you've learned to see if you can apply in "real world" scenerios).  MCSA/MCSE covers similar subjects, except that you're learning older technology. 
    Monday, November 9, 2009 11:43 PM
    Answerer
  • True - these are what I started off with.  Good foundational stuff if you didn't know jack about networking.
    Monday, November 9, 2009 11:44 PM
    Answerer
  • Thank you, for all your advice.  It's time for me to make the decision. Thanks once again.

    Wednesday, November 11, 2009 3:06 PM
  • Hi
    I am MCSE certified and then

    I has been cleared 2 paper 70-646 and 70-649 .But still I haven't recd credential of MCITP: Server Administrator.i recd only MCTS credential. Now what should i do .

    Kindly response me as soon as possible.

    hajifaysal@gmail.com

    Friday, November 13, 2009 9:32 AM
  • First of all, I apologise in advance if these are stupid basic questions which are frequently answered. I have done a bit of a search, but nothing quite seems to answer what I need to know…

     

    I’ve always been seriously into computers, and used to have a business repairing PC’s and laptops, but frankly it’s hard to make money doing that now. I ended up doing something non-IT for years, which I hated, but it paid OK. Now I’ve been made redundant and want to get back into IT, as it’s what I enjoy doing.

     

    1.       What I'd really like to do is get a job with a smaller company (there are loads round here) looking after their systems. I know this is a How-long-is-a-piece-of-string question, but if you wanted to be able to walk into a business having, say, 10-100 PC’s and be reasonably competent to manage their server and network, what are the minimum Microsoft qualifications you’d want to have?

    2.       Moving on from the basic server stuff, would I be expected to understand an email system? If it were Lotus Notes, I'd just quietly slit my wrists and leap in the river, but would MS Exchange be the next most sensible thing after the server stuff, or maybe some kind of SQL module?

    3.       I suppose, really, I'm trying to figure out if it’s possible for me to learn, in say 3 months, by studying effectively full-time at home, enough to pass some of these exams and get a job…

     

    Sorry again for the vague nature of all this, but I'm desperate. I have enough money to hold me for a few months only, and can’t afford to waste time, so I’d like to get started on some qualifications. I don’t know how long they typically take, but I do have the ability currently to study 24/7… well, maybe 16/7.

     

    Somebody suggested something called CompTia A+ - I think that’s the level I'm at already, but don’t know much about networks.

     

     

     

    Thanks

     

     

    Saturday, November 14, 2009 7:02 PM
  • "used to have a business repairing PC’s and laptops," ..... "Somebody suggested something called CompTia A+ - I think that’s the level I'm at already, but don’t know much about networks."

    From your own words, you don't need to take CompTIA A+. However, you need to cover basic networking, and CompTIA Network+ will be a good start.

    1.       What I'd really like to do is get a job with a smaller company (there are loads round here) looking after their systems. I know this is a How-long-is-a-piece-of-string question, but if you wanted to be able to walk into a business having, say, 10-100 PC’s and be reasonably competent to manage their server and network, what are the minimum Microsoft qualifications you’d want to have?

    At a minimum, you are heading straight towards MCSA. MCSA covers one module on client OS, and two modules on server and network, and one elective module.

    2.       Moving on from the basic server stuff, would I be expected to understand an email system? If it were Lotus Notes, I'd just quietly slit my wrists and leap in the river, but would MS Exchange be the next most sensible thing after the server stuff, or maybe some kind of SQL module?

    For small companies, their most common services are proxy (ISA) and email (Exchange). Whereas larger enterprises, they will have both proxy and email, and additional database (SQL). If I were targeting small companies, I’d go for ISA or Exchange. The good news is you can choose either ISA or Exchange, for the MCSA elective module.

    To summarize, you need both CompTIA Network+ and MCSA. Your other option will be to take CompTIA Network+, with MCITP – Server Administrator, with MCTS Windows Vista, with MCTS Exchange.

    Saturday, November 14, 2009 9:31 PM
  • Thanks, that's really useful.
    Saturday, November 14, 2009 10:46 PM
  • I’ve just looked on the CompTia website, and they say “Microsoft includes CompTIA Network+ in their Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA) program”.

     

    So wouldn’t I be duplicating if I were planning to do the MCSA stuff?

    Sunday, November 15, 2009 9:17 AM
  • Hi Hogweed_

    Comptia Network+ is an entry level for network beginners. It'll teach you OSI layer model, ip addressing, subnetting, how to troubleshoot common network problems using TCP/IP tools (ping, pathping, tracert, nslookup, nbtstat). At the end of it, you will understand network better.

    MCSA network module, 70-291 Implementing, Managing, and Maintaining a Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure, teaches network infrastructure in microsoft environment. It'll teach you on managing DHCP, DNS, and RAS.

    I've started from Network+, and it gives me an advantage when taking 70-291.
    Sunday, November 15, 2009 9:38 AM
  • Thanks, you're very kind.
    Sunday, November 15, 2009 10:16 AM
  • It's my pleasure. Wish u all the best.
    Xania's Short Notes: http://xaniasabrina.wordpress.com/
    Sunday, November 15, 2009 10:32 AM
  • the world is currently revolving very fast and times are changing, each and every day we always getting new products in the market. going by this market trends in my opinion i think its safe to acquire certifications for MCITP because IT industry is very competitive and players in the industry will be looking for the person with the latest qualifications not that i dismiss MCSE 2003 but its a question of how us IT personel will adapt to current environmental changes.
    Tuesday, November 17, 2009 11:49 AM
  • Hi jamboree
    True, we have to start from somewhere. Players in the industry may be looking for the person with the latest qualifications. Next question that employers may ask is, whether the qualification suit their company environment. I decided to start on MCSE because the company i work for still using w2k3. And my next step is to upgrade to MCITP. My advise to someone who wants to start, should look into their work environment (is it w2k3 or w2k8), what's their experience level (complete newbie, knows basic, intermediate, or advance), and then decide what's best for them.
    Xania's Short Notes: http://xaniasabrina.wordpress.com/
    Tuesday, November 17, 2009 12:27 PM
  • My advise to someone who wants to start, should look into their work environment (is it w2k3 or w2k8), what's their experience level (complete newbie, knows basic, intermediate, or advance), and then decide what's best for them.
    Xania's Short Notes: http://xaniasabrina.wordpress.com/

    What is your advice to somebody who doesn't have a work environment to look into - someone like me who's looking for a job and doesn't have any work experience? But I have cleared CCNA; not with the help of dumps but sheer hardwork.
    Now I'll have a shot at either MCSE 2003 or MCITP, but can't decide which one to go for.
    Just as most of the people didn't migrate from XP to Vista (Vista being a complete flop IMHO), is it possible that people may not find the need for switching over to Server 2008 in the near future? A lot of people I know - who're working at different places - tell me that their companies have no plans of upgrading to Server 2008 at the moment.
    The other argument I come across is that Server 2003 is an old technology and is going to be obsoleted.
    This has put me in a lot of confusion and I'd really appreciate some help!
    Wednesday, November 18, 2009 9:00 PM
  • Well done on the CCNA. I sat and failed ICND1, so know how hard it is. May revisit it later, but it bored me to tears ;-)

    I decided as im quite lazy just to do MCITP, as it was going to take me one month solid (with days off etc) per exam say, and 5 exams, well thats 5 months further down the line, plus its the older technology at that time , and would have to do another 2 exams (so another 2 months)   to do the EA upgrade, from MCSE, time i just dont have, as thats studying LOTS, with little relaxation etc, not to mention you kind of need other stuff, such as exchange/SQL admin etc to be more rounded, which yep takes more time.

    I work within Dell TS. your spot on with the vista comments. ~90% of the precision machines i deal with are XP, vista was nearly always downgraded to XP, and as soon as win7 went to RC, you wouldnt believe the interest in it, and the sudden switch from XP to win7 in companies!

    For me the answer on the Server certs is also that as 2008, is almost out two years, and is on R2 already, and i think with the economy picking up new systems will be bought, which will come with 2008, rather than 2003, as its basically the same price anyway, but with budgets restrained and the servers being critical to operations, not much is happening now.

    Have you thought about how long it would take you to do it, if that would make it an easier answer for you?  

    Thursday, November 19, 2009 12:47 AM
  • Jojee,If I were you ,I would be confused too .
    The latest technology has been released .and some of the MCSE 2003 exams have been retired ,however ,the Server 2003 is on the market .,maybe will be for long time .
    But I should say that if you understand Server 2008, then your knowledge is somewhat "backwards compatible" and you'd be able to handle Server 2003 in a working environment. 
    OF course ,to keep up with your work enviroment ,you can consider about MCSE 2003 firstly ,and if necessary ,consider about upgrading your MCSE 2003 to MCTS /MCITP.

    The above is just my advice .YOu can choose yours.
    The following post maybe useful for u.

    News :MCSE/MCSA has timed out ??


    hope it useful for u

    _______________________________________________
    Microsoft experience http://www.microsoftkit.com
    IT ceritificaton IT training http://www.my-dig.com
    Server 2008 OS blog http://www.microsoftbible.com

    Thursday, November 19, 2009 12:57 AM
  • Newbies.. go for MCITP :)
    And yes it is backward compatible. So if u hv MCITP but u r managing w2k3, u already hv ms core foundation, and with little research and reading u'll be able to manage w2k3 in no time.

    Congrats for completing CCNA. Wish u all the best in ur further studies.

    Xania's Short Notes: http://xaniasabrina.wordpress.com/
    Thursday, November 19, 2009 4:03 PM
  • Thanks a trillion guys for all the useful info. You've really helped me make a decision and MCITP it is :)
    THANKS, you guys are the best!!!
    Friday, November 20, 2009 10:05 AM
  • Take these advices with a grain of salt.  we do not know your next job or your career.  if you worked in something as big as DoD, MCSE 2003 is trump and will be used for a while as they wont just kick it off the side and spend billions replacing all the systems they already spent billions on.  if your with a smaller commercial company then most likely these newer operating systems are allowed and have already passed validations (if applicable) to be used in their networks.  best path? spend all your time knocking the MCSE out, it is still microsofts premiere and most respected certification and will remain for some time (at least 1yr+).  Yes, 2003 will eventually be outdated, but no, not everyone can afford to change their infrastructure every time new software versions are released, specially the big ones. 
    Saturday, January 23, 2010 5:21 AM
  • In many forums, i read that mcse 2003 is still going to around for a long time or until companies start to migrate to 2008 servers.  Since i do not have any knowledge or experience in networking i.e mcse 2003, would you still recommend jumping into MCITP?


    However,in some areas or some counties ,the working enviorment is Server 2008 ,so if the candidates have no experience or knowledge ,it is ok for them  to take MCITP exams directly .
    Microsoft experience http://www.microsoftkit.com
    training http://www.getinmore.com
    Monday, January 25, 2010 3:05 AM