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How long (in ideal days) to become a Windows 4 Developer? RRS feed

  • Question



  • So VS2010 EDU should hopefully be winging it's way towards me as I type so looking to see what .NET v4.0 certifications are available to guide my learning...

    http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/cert-vstudio.aspx#tab2

    Windows 4.0 Developer looks odds on favorite but I'm wondering how much time will it take, 4 exams are a lot!!

    One lone developer learning the combined work of over a thousand Microsoft developers. There is a LOT to cover!!

    Considering I do not do any WPF / WCF / Entity Framework at work (unless your willing to offer me a job that does? Folks, I'm up for it if your company is, 13 years .NET experience) then how much time, ideal time (8 hours a day uninterupted), would it take do you think?

    Yip it depends is certainly the answer I'm getting myself but how long approximately do you feel it would take, roughly? a year at 8 hours a day?

    How long did it take you? what did you do to speed up the learning?

    and what do you believe are good ways to reduce the time, ways to learn faster?


    I'd appreciate your thoughts.
    …we each have more potential than we might ever presume to guess.
    Friday, August 6, 2010 12:50 PM

Answers

  • I think this question cannot be answered directly. It always depends on the person (how fast do you learn) and how good you want to be.

    If you want to do it proper, then I would take as much time as required. And that is lot of time, because I always wanted to play around a lot and test everything. And there are a lot of topics that I never heared about before that I played around.

    I think, that you really learn by doing. So I can say: I really used some topics like Isolated storage. That is a difference to "I read about it!". Normaly, yoru remember best, if you really used something. If you just read it, you will forget it quite soon ...

    But yes - if you want to get it as quick as possible, I know, what I would do:

    1) Get the praxis test from MeasureUp / SelfTestSoftware
    2) Simply do the questions. BUT: FOr each question you have to not just find the correct answer. Give reasons why the correct answer is correct and what is wrong with the others! And if you cannot do that: Follow the links and read very carefully so you understoof dully, why the question had these answeres and what is meant with it....
    3) when you got all questions correctly: Go to the exam ....

    BUT: I would not go this way. And we can just look at the results of all my exams. In my 70-433 and 70-505 exams was some nice different topics: Some topics I was able to play around and some other Topics I was unable to really play around (e.g. Deployment of Applications or some tools for SQL Sevrer i will not use at work ...) I had very good scores in the areas where I played around. But the bars for the areas where I did less practices and only read was simply bad. (ok, bad is relative. I got my points and was far away from failing an exam. But you really saw the difference!)

    You have 13 years experience in .Net? Then maybe you can simply remove a lot of wrong answers by just looking at them. Some answeres are really nasty :)

    Another important point is: What do you use for preparation? For Visual Studio 2008 you have nice Self paced Training kits. But these books are not available on 2010! So you have to spend some time on finding the right documentation. That could also be important.

    I am not sure, if I was able to help you. I can jsut give you my experience but you always have to remember, that all human beeings are different ...

    With kind regards,

    Konrad

    Friday, August 6, 2010 1:20 PM
    Answerer

All replies

  • I think this question cannot be answered directly. It always depends on the person (how fast do you learn) and how good you want to be.

    If you want to do it proper, then I would take as much time as required. And that is lot of time, because I always wanted to play around a lot and test everything. And there are a lot of topics that I never heared about before that I played around.

    I think, that you really learn by doing. So I can say: I really used some topics like Isolated storage. That is a difference to "I read about it!". Normaly, yoru remember best, if you really used something. If you just read it, you will forget it quite soon ...

    But yes - if you want to get it as quick as possible, I know, what I would do:

    1) Get the praxis test from MeasureUp / SelfTestSoftware
    2) Simply do the questions. BUT: FOr each question you have to not just find the correct answer. Give reasons why the correct answer is correct and what is wrong with the others! And if you cannot do that: Follow the links and read very carefully so you understoof dully, why the question had these answeres and what is meant with it....
    3) when you got all questions correctly: Go to the exam ....

    BUT: I would not go this way. And we can just look at the results of all my exams. In my 70-433 and 70-505 exams was some nice different topics: Some topics I was able to play around and some other Topics I was unable to really play around (e.g. Deployment of Applications or some tools for SQL Sevrer i will not use at work ...) I had very good scores in the areas where I played around. But the bars for the areas where I did less practices and only read was simply bad. (ok, bad is relative. I got my points and was far away from failing an exam. But you really saw the difference!)

    You have 13 years experience in .Net? Then maybe you can simply remove a lot of wrong answers by just looking at them. Some answeres are really nasty :)

    Another important point is: What do you use for preparation? For Visual Studio 2008 you have nice Self paced Training kits. But these books are not available on 2010! So you have to spend some time on finding the right documentation. That could also be important.

    I am not sure, if I was able to help you. I can jsut give you my experience but you always have to remember, that all human beeings are different ...

    With kind regards,

    Konrad

    Friday, August 6, 2010 1:20 PM
    Answerer
  • no that's rubbish, it's not 13 years of .NET... 13 years of development experience ... 7 years of which .NET ... I'm an idiot!!  Offer still stands though if any company is looking.

     

    Konrad, thank you for taking the time to answer that 'how long is a piece of string' question.

    I'm wanting to do the study in the most reasonable length of time possible. As you said the quickest path isn't the best path but likewise I don't want it to drag on... even a year feels a lot but perhaps about right... an exam every 3 months feels possible but is 3 months enough time to learn WPF, 3 months for WCF, yeah it's possible but not full time unless I'm working with the technologies. Think that's the key to getting this done in a reasonable time.

    You did mention something I hadn't considered fully, well actually maybe I'm doing it now.... preparation. I'll have a look for the training kits but I remember they were only pointers to other material found online.

    It was one of those questions, but getting ideas from other people might just add something new.

    Thanks Konrad, marked as helpful.

     

    Anyone else got advice? any good training (free) courses? and valuable training materials that will help reduce the time?

    any other techniques for learning ?

     

    actually here is a question.... is it worth it? is all four qualification worth doing? is one more valuable than the other? or do they compliment each other?

     

     


    …we each have more potential than we might ever presume to guess.
    Friday, August 6, 2010 3:03 PM
  • There are a lot of interesting websites and blogs available. I really like CodeProject.com to see, how other developers tried something. If you use it just a source to
    a) lookup stuff on MSDN
    b) play around
    it is really great.

    I also know, that a lot of people tried to create introductions and so such stuff. So it can be worth searching on google for "C# tutorial" or something like that.

    But I fear, that you cannot reduce the time. You can only extend the time, learn more stuff or stuff deeper so you are much better prepared for the exam.

    One good thing to spend time on are MSDN forums. Just start reading them. Then try to answer them on your own and read, what others write to your answer. That can also help alot. (So for example: I read a question and then I go to MSDn and read about it. Or play around quickly because I am not 100% sure, how everything fits together and how it will behave. That tactic helps in two ways: 1st you read something so you learn something you didn't know (and when you have to write it down in your own words in an answer, you really have to understand it first) and 2nd you get much better in your searching skill. So when you get a problem, you can find an answer quicker.

    That is something, that I can extend my answer. But I fear there is no shortcut possible to get the exams quicker. (At least not, if you want to use it. It might bepossible to simply learn quickly and pass the exam. But then you might get fired, because people are simply disappointed of your skills.

    With kind regards,

    Konrad

    Thursday, August 12, 2010 2:28 PM
    Answerer
  • But I fear there is no shortcut possible to get the exams quicker. (At least not, if you want to use it. It might bepossible to simply learn quickly and pass the exam. But then you might get fired, because people are simply disappointed of your skills.

    With kind regards,

    Konrad

    Hi Konrad, again thanks for coming back with some information.... I think you've summed it up perfectly there... it will take as long as it will take if you want to get the most out of it (which I do, no point doing it if you don't got all you can from it). I always thought that would be the answer.

    My question perhaps was hoping something I already knew was wrong or there was an education silver bullet and if there had been it would be well known by now. 

    I'll close off the thread, give you the points, and thanks for your input Konrad. It's time to start studying.


    …we each have more potential than we might ever presume to guess.
    Thursday, August 12, 2010 4:03 PM