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Reproducing an A1 plan with an A4 scanner RRS feed

  • Question

  • I need to reproduce a 100 year old property deed which is about A1.

    I have an Epson v700 flatbed scanner.

    Does anyone have experience of doing this an patching it together with ICE?

    All suggestions and warnings will be enthusiastically accepted.

    Foregive me if I do not reply instantly as I am away from home for 48 hours - but I need to do the job when I get back.

    Tony

    London UK

    Tuesday, January 27, 2015 7:40 AM

Answers

  • Thanks for the reply.

    I have done the scan and the results were acceptable to my client.

    The composite image needed a bit of warp correction as it was not rectangular. I feel our greatest problem was getting a 100 year old parchment to lie flat on the scanner - and not the software which was brilliant.

    It is a fast computer with masses of RAM so that aspect needed no attention.

    Thanks again.

    Tony

    Friday, February 6, 2015 7:29 AM
  • Hi, Tony,

    I can't say I've done exactly what you describe, but doing the actual scanning of the deed (making sure that all portions are flat on the scanner bed when being scanned) sounds like it will be the most challenging part of this project for you.

    Once the overlapping scans have been saved (and rotated so that they are all right side up, if need be), it should be as simple as dragging the images into ICE and allowing it to put them together with one of the planar motion settings.

    Naturally, your computer should have plenty of RAM available for ICE to use.
    You can change how much RAM ICE can use at one time by opening the options/settings.
    You can also monitor how much RAM your system has available to it in the 'Performance' tab of the Task Manager.

    If you have any trouble after scanning and would like a little assistance in putting the pieces together I would be willing to assist you, provided that you have a broadband internet connection to upload the scans to OneDrive or a similar online storage facility.

    Best regards,
    N


    There is no effect without a cause.

    • Marked as answer by Tony Gamble Saturday, February 7, 2015 1:56 PM
    Thursday, February 5, 2015 11:49 PM

All replies

  • Hi, Tony,

    I can't say I've done exactly what you describe, but doing the actual scanning of the deed (making sure that all portions are flat on the scanner bed when being scanned) sounds like it will be the most challenging part of this project for you.

    Once the overlapping scans have been saved (and rotated so that they are all right side up, if need be), it should be as simple as dragging the images into ICE and allowing it to put them together with one of the planar motion settings.

    Naturally, your computer should have plenty of RAM available for ICE to use.
    You can change how much RAM ICE can use at one time by opening the options/settings.
    You can also monitor how much RAM your system has available to it in the 'Performance' tab of the Task Manager.

    If you have any trouble after scanning and would like a little assistance in putting the pieces together I would be willing to assist you, provided that you have a broadband internet connection to upload the scans to OneDrive or a similar online storage facility.

    Best regards,
    N


    There is no effect without a cause.

    • Marked as answer by Tony Gamble Saturday, February 7, 2015 1:56 PM
    Thursday, February 5, 2015 11:49 PM
  • Thanks for the reply.

    I have done the scan and the results were acceptable to my client.

    The composite image needed a bit of warp correction as it was not rectangular. I feel our greatest problem was getting a 100 year old parchment to lie flat on the scanner - and not the software which was brilliant.

    It is a fast computer with masses of RAM so that aspect needed no attention.

    Thanks again.

    Tony

    Friday, February 6, 2015 7:29 AM