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Disk allocation seems impossible, how to fix? New Person, same types of problems RRS feed

  • Question

  • This is the hardware that I am running: IBM x342 server with 6x73gb drives the drives are configured as 2x73 raid 1 for the OS and 4x73 raid 5 for the storage. After installing WHS with power pack 3 (downloaded yesterday) (I got it started and then left, and this is what I found when I got back) I found that it had crated a 20gb Drive:C SYS, and a 253GB Drive D: DATA drives. When I go to check the properties of the drives, it showes Drive:D as 253 GB free space, but it also showes the Capacity as only 48.3 GB for the "Used Space" it showes ./'('.(+,)(, bytes 849522688 There is no way that I trust this setup. What if I remove the Raid 5 completely, reinstall the OS with only the Raid 1 in the computer, then turn the Raid 5 back on? I only want the OS installed on the raid 1, and all data installed on the raid 5. I did just have this installed on a different "server" for a test with only a 73gb drive installed, and it only made one partion, that was 73gb. If I do get it installed with the OS as a 73GB, and then add the 205GB Raid 5, then later swap out the raid 5 drives for 300GB drives, how do I save the data? (I do have a 750GB external drive that the data could be moved to) I think it's a little silly that the drives were setup in this fashion, MS should at least have the OS give us an option to auto config the drives, or user define the settings.
    • Edited by Adam_Carter Tuesday, December 22, 2009 9:57 PM typo
    Tuesday, December 22, 2009 9:53 PM

Answers

  • Forcing setup for Windows Home Server to use one "drive" (or RAID array in this case) for the OS, and another for storage isn't practical (or supported). To do so, you would need to interrupt setup at an appropriate point, resize and move partitions, and then allow setup to resume. In addition, if at some point in the future you need to reinstall (perhaps due to system drive failure, perhaps OS corruption) this configuration may prevent a successful reinstallation entirely.

    Regarding how the drives are partitioned, remember that Windows Home Server is designed to be installed by an OEM and bought at retail in a hardware/software bundle like the MediaSmart line from HP. The intended market is mostly non-technical people who have multiple computers at home, lots of data, and no way to organize it all. As a result, installation options are very limited, and end user interaction with the OS is through the Windows Home Server console, rather than logging in to the server directly.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by Adam_Carter Friday, December 25, 2009 1:15 PM
    Wednesday, December 23, 2009 2:53 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Well I thought about it, and I have desided to reformat the server, and change the drive config. I will install WHS with just the 2x73 drives in a raid 1, then after the OS is installed I will bring the 4x74 GB raid 5 on-line. Hopefully if I do this it will set the "OS" drive as one partition (like it did before when I only have one 73GB drive as the OS) then bring the Raid 5 on-line. I hope that once this is done, I can configure WHS to use the Raid 5 to store all of the back-ups, and shared files. MS should give you the option to configure your own drives during setup, if you feel so inclined.
    • Edited by Adam_Carter Tuesday, December 22, 2009 11:21 PM spelling
    Tuesday, December 22, 2009 11:20 PM
  • Hi Adam,
    RAID is still not supported with Windows Home Server, so while it may working, any troubleshooting (especially in context with a server reinstall) is on your own.
    See also Why RAID is not a consumer technology in the WHS team blog.

    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Wednesday, December 23, 2009 2:33 PM
    Moderator
  • Forcing setup for Windows Home Server to use one "drive" (or RAID array in this case) for the OS, and another for storage isn't practical (or supported). To do so, you would need to interrupt setup at an appropriate point, resize and move partitions, and then allow setup to resume. In addition, if at some point in the future you need to reinstall (perhaps due to system drive failure, perhaps OS corruption) this configuration may prevent a successful reinstallation entirely.

    Regarding how the drives are partitioned, remember that Windows Home Server is designed to be installed by an OEM and bought at retail in a hardware/software bundle like the MediaSmart line from HP. The intended market is mostly non-technical people who have multiple computers at home, lots of data, and no way to organize it all. As a result, installation options are very limited, and end user interaction with the OS is through the Windows Home Server console, rather than logging in to the server directly.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by Adam_Carter Friday, December 25, 2009 1:15 PM
    Wednesday, December 23, 2009 2:53 PM
    Moderator
  • Well I decided to setup the six drives as one large raid 5, I ended up with 341GB of space (20 sys, and 321 data). This is not the "best" setup in my eyes, since I have been a network admin for several years. I had a Windows 2003 server running, but I liked the "bare metal restore" that WHS offered. It makes it simple to backup all of my home computers, without me having to manage it.

    Items that I think should be added: (at this point)
    1. Some type of an add-in that allows more advanced users better control of the storage pool. Yes it is a GREAT idea how it is setup, for standard home users, but I would think that 30-60% of people managing WHS are NOT standard home users.
    2. Have "Microsoft Security Essentials" configured to work on WHS, I know they don't want people to be able to run it on a 2003 SBS server (what WHS really is) but that shouldn't be a huge problem. The fact that Microsoft is some what ignoring this problem scares the ____ out of me. Why would you ever setup a server of any kind with out antivirus? It is connected to the internet, and it will have files moved to it from potintaly infected client computers.
    3. Configure it so that if you add an external drive to the system, that you can run a FULL BACKUP of the server, without some "add-in". why whould you run a server with no backup? This backup should have the option of doing a "full metal restore".


    All in all I think WHS is a great product, but there are a few areas that could use some fine tuning.

    Friday, December 25, 2009 1:38 PM
  • The problem in this setup I see is mainly the bad relation between the storage capacity and the number of disks (resulting in high power consumption, noise, heat, increased risk of a single or multiple disk failure - especially if you have no spare disk to replace a failed disk quickly). And we have seen reports, that some SCSI controllers change the disk ID during a rebuild of an array, which causes the drive go missing in the storage pool.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Saturday, December 26, 2009 10:49 PM
    Moderator