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what are the capabilities for user accounts RRS feed

  • Question

  • at work i sign in to our domain...

     

    i can do certain things with my computer and have certain apps available, and i cannot do other things, e.g. install software, etc

     

    is this what windows home user does? it it really windows 2003 server...

     

    can i set up user accounts; be able to log onto any account from any computer on the network; have permissions setup etc...have my outlook follow me around...like it is at work...

     

     

     

    Friday, January 11, 2008 11:39 AM

Answers

  • Most of the features you're asking about are Active Directory features (as implemented in your workplace), which Windows Home Server doesn't support. If you need those features you can use Small Business Server instead of (or in addition to) Windows Home Server.
    Friday, January 11, 2008 12:26 PM
    Moderator
  • What you are looking for is definitely a domain environment, which is yes beyond the intended scope of stay-at-home server.

     

    In contrast to the network administrator that configures and maintains domain controllers, active directory and RAS services, Windows Home Server is designed for the network administrators who are generally referred to by their user base as 'Mom' or 'Dad'.   

    Saturday, January 12, 2008 3:09 AM

All replies

  • Most of the features you're asking about are Active Directory features (as implemented in your workplace), which Windows Home Server doesn't support. If you need those features you can use Small Business Server instead of (or in addition to) Windows Home Server.
    Friday, January 11, 2008 12:26 PM
    Moderator
  • do i understand it correct:

     

    windows home server is a server in the sense that certain computer functions are shared:  primarily storage, e.g. music files; picturers; user files....

     

    but even though it is based on windows server 2003, it would not make all the computers on my network a true client server system in the sense that i could log on to any computer and have my stuff move around...

     

    so some stuff is client server, and files can be shared but in a sense each computer is still an island...

     

    my problem is: the two family computers and the 2 kids computers can share files; but have different accounts with different capabilities,...the different account on the different computers get out of sych with different local files and apps...but i need a fuller version of windows 2003 server to really unify everything...

     

    Saturday, January 12, 2008 2:12 AM
  •  mdb288 wrote:
    do i understand it correct:

     

    windows home server is a server in the sense that certain computer functions are shared:  primarily storage, e.g. music files; picturers; user files....

     

    but even though it is based on windows server 2003, it would not make all the computers on my network a true client server system in the sense that i could log on to any computer and have my stuff move around...

     

    You can logon to any computer that has a local profile set up with a user name and password.  Then, you access WHS through the shares using a user name and password to gain access to it as well.  (I believe you are referring to Roaming Profiles, which is not possible in WHS since you need a domain for that and it can't be part of a domain.)

     

     mdb288 wrote:
    so some stuff is client server, and files can be shared but in a sense each computer is still an island...

     

    my problem is: the two family computers and the 2 kids computers can share files; but have different accounts with different capabilities,...the different account on the different computers get out of sych with different local files and apps...but i need a fuller version of windows 2003 server to really unify everything...

     

    I'm not sure what you mean by out-of-sync.  Can you please clarify/give an example?

    Saturday, January 12, 2008 2:22 AM
    Moderator
  • The answer to your question is no. Windows Home Server is intended for a workgroup-based home network; when you create user accounts on the home server via the Console, the username and passwords should match the usernames and passwords on each home computer; this allows any of these user to connect to the home server shares without being prompted for credentials. A user folder is created in addition to the default shares on the home server for each user created that is only accessible by that user unless permissions are granted to other users.

     

    Windows Home Server is a server in that it provides a central place to store all of your stuff with redundancy, stream your music and video from, remotely access your shared files and computers from the internet and backup all of your home computers with ease.

    Saturday, January 12, 2008 2:24 AM
  • thanks everyone for the answers...

     

    to reply to kariya21

     

    i have 4 computers and 4 people: so i need 16 accounts (4/computer) dad; mom; kid1; kid2...and i can use shared directories to kind of unify things...e.g. quicken on all 4 computers point to a shared directory so i can use quicken on all 4 computers...but it just gets to complicated...stuff gets installed on one computer but not another...it is too hard to keep track of everything...there are shared directories but no underlying unification...

     

    i guess the full windows server 2003 would do it; but it would be very expense; take many hours to learn to set up even the simple 4 person system i envision; and cost$$$...

     

    i had hoped windows home server did this...and it will do some...sound like multimedia is served centrally...

     

    the info on this product is kind of sketchy...i got my hope up when i read "based on windows 2003 server"...

     

    oh well...guess i beat this topic into a dead horse...thanks all...

     

    Saturday, January 12, 2008 2:54 AM
  • What you are looking for is definitely a domain environment, which is yes beyond the intended scope of stay-at-home server.

     

    In contrast to the network administrator that configures and maintains domain controllers, active directory and RAS services, Windows Home Server is designed for the network administrators who are generally referred to by their user base as 'Mom' or 'Dad'.   

    Saturday, January 12, 2008 3:09 AM