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Changing from DHCP to Static IP looses Internet connection RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi Not sure if this is the right place but please help if you can. Basically, my routers ip is 192.168.2.1 Up till now i've just used it's DHCP to assign IPs to my laptops and desk PC. However I wanted to assign the WHS a static IP. So I started the DHCP at 192.168.2.10 and assigned my server an IP of 192.168.2.2. Although I can talk fine to the server using remote desktop from my desk PC, the WHS does not have any internet access. If I change the WHS IP to automatic and let it be assigned an IP from the DHCP, the internet works just fine. This also happens on my Desk PC, as I wanted to assign that a static IP, but again doing that looses me internet access and going back to DHCP gets me the internet back again. Please help as I cannot figure out whats wrong. Thanks Andy
    Friday, September 4, 2009 10:18 PM

Answers

  • Ah ok thanks, i'll try that! BRB!!
    • Marked as answer by Andy Thilo Saturday, September 5, 2009 7:07 AM
    Saturday, September 5, 2009 6:27 AM
  • Still couldnt get it to work by using that method. So what i've done now succesfully, is in my router, I've reserved all the IPs that we're assigned by DHCP. Now their showing as static and it's all working. The only downside is I cant pick my own IP, I have to take what the DHCP has given me. I could probably work round that by changing the DHCP range but as it's all working now I cant be bothered :D.

    Thanks for your help.

    Oh and remote access works now :D.
    • Marked as answer by Andy Thilo Saturday, September 5, 2009 7:07 AM
    Saturday, September 5, 2009 7:06 AM

All replies

  • With your DHCP set to start at 192.168.2.10, assign static addresses to your WHS and other devices at some number greater than 10. Otherwise your particular router may ignore everything below 10 and not allow access to the internet.
    Personally, I start DHCP at 100 and assign several static addresses above 100.
    • Marked as answer by Andy Thilo Saturday, September 5, 2009 7:07 AM
    • Unmarked as answer by Ken WarrenModerator Saturday, September 5, 2009 1:47 PM
    Saturday, September 5, 2009 12:07 AM
  • Ah ok thanks, i'll try that! BRB!!
    • Marked as answer by Andy Thilo Saturday, September 5, 2009 7:07 AM
    Saturday, September 5, 2009 6:27 AM
  • Still couldnt get it to work by using that method. So what i've done now succesfully, is in my router, I've reserved all the IPs that we're assigned by DHCP. Now their showing as static and it's all working. The only downside is I cant pick my own IP, I have to take what the DHCP has given me. I could probably work round that by changing the DHCP range but as it's all working now I cant be bothered :D.

    Thanks for your help.

    Oh and remote access works now :D.
    • Marked as answer by Andy Thilo Saturday, September 5, 2009 7:07 AM
    Saturday, September 5, 2009 7:06 AM
  • With your DHCP set to start at 192.168.2.10, assign static addresses to your WHS and other devices at some number greater than 10. Otherwise your particular router may ignore everything below 10 and not allow access to the internet.
    Personally, I start DHCP at 100 and assign several static addresses above 100.
    This is wrong. If your DHCP server (usually built into your router) is set to start assigning addresses at 192.168.2.10, then you do not want to manually configure IP addresses in the same range. Your DHCP server doesn't know about those manually configured computers, and will happily hand out the same IP address in a DHCP lease. The result will be computers that don't connect reliably to your network, and it's a difficult problem to diagnose.

    If you're going to assign fixed IP addresses to computers on your home network, there are two ways to do it.

    First, you can assign that address manually. In that case, you have to make sure that you set that computer correctly. The IP address has to be in the same range (in this case 192.168.2.###) as the other computers on your network, but outside the IP range that the DHCP server itself will use, and you have to set DNS servers, WINS servers, etc. manually on that computer as well.

    The alternative, if your DHCP server supports it, is what the OP did, which is create a DHCP reservation. In this case, you tie a specific IP address in your DHCP server's range to a specific piece of hardware (as identified by MAC address ), and the DHCP server always assigns the same IP address to that piece of hardware. All other configuration parameters will be the same for all computers.

    DHCP reservations are the preferred solution in a home network. If you need to change settings for your network (say your ISP changes the IP addresses of their name servers) you do it once.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Saturday, September 5, 2009 1:56 PM
    Moderator