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  • Question

  • I'm planning to do an upgrade on my PC which I built using a Windows XP Professional OEM software purchased from NewEgg. 
    The upgrades will include motherboard and processor.

    I plan on using the same ide hard drive that XP is installed on now.

    Will I have a problem doing this with the OEM software that I own.
    Tuesday, May 29, 2007 5:38 PM

Answers

  • Testmonkey,

     

    You should not have a problem if the OEM software has never been installed.

     

     

    Stephen Holm, MS

    OGA and WGA Forum Manager

    Tuesday, May 29, 2007 6:31 PM
  • Noo, sorry I wasn't clear on that. The OEM has been installed on this very system for a couple years.

    Just wanted to do an update... to swap out the motherboard and processor and use the XP PRO OEM disk.

    Tuesday, May 29, 2007 7:12 PM
  • Testmonkey,

     

    Here is a website which can address some of your quetsions  http://www.microsoft.com/piracy/activation_faq.mspx.  Also please read the End User Licensing Agreement (EULA)  for your particular version of Windows.  You may have to telephone activate windows.

     

    Stephen Holm, MS

    WGA and OGA Forum Manager

    Wednesday, May 30, 2007 12:20 AM
  • Testmonkey,

    OEM licenses for XP are valid only on the computer onto which the license is first installed, and that license cannot be moved to another computer (unlike the retail license, which can be moved from one computer to another).

    For the purposes of defining what a computer is, since a computer is just a collection of parts, MS has established that the motherboard is the base component that defines a computer.  Therefore, an OEM license cannot be moved from one motherboard to another.

    There is one exception to the above policy, and that is to accommodate a situation where the original motherboard was replaced because it was defective.

    So, under the circumstances you describe, you would not be allowed to move the original OEM license for XP from your old motherboard to a new motherboard, since the reason for the move is not that the original has become defective.

    Wednesday, May 30, 2007 2:45 AM
  • Thanks Dan, that's what I needed.
    Wednesday, May 30, 2007 10:00 AM
  • Testmonkey,

     

    You're welcome!

    Wednesday, May 30, 2007 2:03 PM
  •  Testmonkey wrote:
    I'm planning to do an upgrade on my PC which I built using a Windows XP Professional OEM software purchased from NewEgg. 
    The upgrades will include motherboard and processor.

    I plan on using the same ide hard drive that XP is installed on now.

    Will I have a problem doing this with the OEM software that I own.
    Friday, June 1, 2007 3:56 PM
  • The biggest "problem" you will have is that whenever a motherboard is replaced with anything other than the exact same make and model board, it will be necessary to reformat the hard disk and re-install Windows.  If you do not do this, then what will happen is that at startup, you will see the Windows XP logo with the "loading" bar at the bottom, and then you will either get a blue screen "stop" error, or it will simply reboot and dump you back at the BIOS splash screen.  There is a way to remedy this through a "repair installation", but I would recommend against that.  Reformatting and re-installing is the way to go.

     

    If this copy of Windows was last activated a year or more ago, it will activate fine over the Internet, even with a different motherboard.  Even brand name OEM licenses work this way, which is useful when replacing a burned-out HP or Emachines motherboard with a retail board of similar specs.

     

    If this copy of Windows was last activated within a year, or if it's a brand name OEM license (which yours is not) then Internet activation may fail, and you would have to do a telephone activation.

     

    One thing I will tell you is that with a generic OEM system builder license, the activation reps WILL approve a telephone activation for a replaced motherboard, even if you say you are upgrading, or got tired of the old one.  All they will ask is if the software is loaded on more than one machine, and from your description, the answer is "no".

     

    Whether this is "legal" per the license agreement is difficult to ascertain, because there are actually two separate agreements--the system builder agreement, and the end user license agreement--which you are party to.  Although an end-user does not have the right to replace a motherboard for "upgrade" purposes, a computer manufacturer can replace any part(s) in the system they sell with whatever their "approved" warranty replacement part(s) are.  So since YOU are the computer manufacturer, and the end-user, you would just replace the motherboard with whatever board you select as your "approved" replacement and reformat the hard disk and re-install your operating system.

    Friday, June 1, 2007 5:27 PM
  •  Some History:  This motherboard I'm replacing has been nothing but trouble since I purchased it  from my son who was moving to Europe and would not be building his PC . The little star would not have been my first choice (didn't know if I could use brand names  ) since it was an AGP and Socket 754.  The little star didn't have much wiggle room to upgrade with.

    So I will try to do a reformat and install on an "approved" warranty replacement motherboard and a few other things with the info you people provided.

    If by chance this doesn't work out as planned I will reluctantly purchase my LAST M$ OS for this rebuild and move on to Linux for the next build.

    I want to Thank You people for your HELP.

    "IF THANKS WHERE WEIGHED IN GRAMS I WOULD OWE YOU TONS"

    If there was a "results" page I would post the outcome of my trip to "activation h___"


    Saturday, June 2, 2007 12:01 PM

All replies

  • Testmonkey,

     

    You should not have a problem if the OEM software has never been installed.

     

     

    Stephen Holm, MS

    OGA and WGA Forum Manager

    Tuesday, May 29, 2007 6:31 PM
  • Noo, sorry I wasn't clear on that. The OEM has been installed on this very system for a couple years.

    Just wanted to do an update... to swap out the motherboard and processor and use the XP PRO OEM disk.

    Tuesday, May 29, 2007 7:12 PM
  • Testmonkey,

     

    Here is a website which can address some of your quetsions  http://www.microsoft.com/piracy/activation_faq.mspx.  Also please read the End User Licensing Agreement (EULA)  for your particular version of Windows.  You may have to telephone activate windows.

     

    Stephen Holm, MS

    WGA and OGA Forum Manager

    Wednesday, May 30, 2007 12:20 AM
  • Testmonkey,

    OEM licenses for XP are valid only on the computer onto which the license is first installed, and that license cannot be moved to another computer (unlike the retail license, which can be moved from one computer to another).

    For the purposes of defining what a computer is, since a computer is just a collection of parts, MS has established that the motherboard is the base component that defines a computer.  Therefore, an OEM license cannot be moved from one motherboard to another.

    There is one exception to the above policy, and that is to accommodate a situation where the original motherboard was replaced because it was defective.

    So, under the circumstances you describe, you would not be allowed to move the original OEM license for XP from your old motherboard to a new motherboard, since the reason for the move is not that the original has become defective.

    Wednesday, May 30, 2007 2:45 AM
  • Thanks Dan, that's what I needed.
    Wednesday, May 30, 2007 10:00 AM
  • Testmonkey,

     

    You're welcome!

    Wednesday, May 30, 2007 2:03 PM
  •  Testmonkey wrote:
    I'm planning to do an upgrade on my PC which I built using a Windows XP Professional OEM software purchased from NewEgg. 
    The upgrades will include motherboard and processor.

    I plan on using the same ide hard drive that XP is installed on now.

    Will I have a problem doing this with the OEM software that I own.
    Friday, June 1, 2007 3:56 PM
  • The biggest "problem" you will have is that whenever a motherboard is replaced with anything other than the exact same make and model board, it will be necessary to reformat the hard disk and re-install Windows.  If you do not do this, then what will happen is that at startup, you will see the Windows XP logo with the "loading" bar at the bottom, and then you will either get a blue screen "stop" error, or it will simply reboot and dump you back at the BIOS splash screen.  There is a way to remedy this through a "repair installation", but I would recommend against that.  Reformatting and re-installing is the way to go.

     

    If this copy of Windows was last activated a year or more ago, it will activate fine over the Internet, even with a different motherboard.  Even brand name OEM licenses work this way, which is useful when replacing a burned-out HP or Emachines motherboard with a retail board of similar specs.

     

    If this copy of Windows was last activated within a year, or if it's a brand name OEM license (which yours is not) then Internet activation may fail, and you would have to do a telephone activation.

     

    One thing I will tell you is that with a generic OEM system builder license, the activation reps WILL approve a telephone activation for a replaced motherboard, even if you say you are upgrading, or got tired of the old one.  All they will ask is if the software is loaded on more than one machine, and from your description, the answer is "no".

     

    Whether this is "legal" per the license agreement is difficult to ascertain, because there are actually two separate agreements--the system builder agreement, and the end user license agreement--which you are party to.  Although an end-user does not have the right to replace a motherboard for "upgrade" purposes, a computer manufacturer can replace any part(s) in the system they sell with whatever their "approved" warranty replacement part(s) are.  So since YOU are the computer manufacturer, and the end-user, you would just replace the motherboard with whatever board you select as your "approved" replacement and reformat the hard disk and re-install your operating system.

    Friday, June 1, 2007 5:27 PM
  •  Some History:  This motherboard I'm replacing has been nothing but trouble since I purchased it  from my son who was moving to Europe and would not be building his PC . The little star would not have been my first choice (didn't know if I could use brand names  ) since it was an AGP and Socket 754.  The little star didn't have much wiggle room to upgrade with.

    So I will try to do a reformat and install on an "approved" warranty replacement motherboard and a few other things with the info you people provided.

    If by chance this doesn't work out as planned I will reluctantly purchase my LAST M$ OS for this rebuild and move on to Linux for the next build.

    I want to Thank You people for your HELP.

    "IF THANKS WHERE WEIGHED IN GRAMS I WOULD OWE YOU TONS"

    If there was a "results" page I would post the outcome of my trip to "activation h___"


    Saturday, June 2, 2007 12:01 PM