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  • Question

  • Can some one tel me whats the basic difference between NTFS, FAT etc.. I am not aware of it !
    Thursday, March 8, 2007 12:07 PM

Answers

  • NTFS or New Technology File System is the standard file system of Windows NT and its descendants Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, and Windows Vista.

    NTFS replaced Microsoft's previous FAT file system, used in MS-DOS and early versions of Windows. NTFS has several improvements over FAT such as improved support for metadata and the use of advanced data structures to improve performance, reliability, and disk space utilization plus additional extensions such as security access control lists and file system journaling. The exact specification is a trade secret, although (since NTFS v3.00) it can be licensed commercially from Microsoft through their Intellectual Property Licensing program.

    NTFS has five versions:

    • v1.0
    • v1.1
    • v1.2 found in NT 3.51 and NT 4
    • v3.0 found in Windows 2000
    • v3.1 found in Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, and Windows Vista

    These final three versions are sometimes referred to as v5.0, v5.1, and v6.0, after the version of Windows with which they ship. Each newer version added extra features, for example Windows 2000 introduced quotas.

    File Allocation Table (FAT) is a partially patented file system developed by Microsoft for MS-DOS and is the primary file system for consumer versions of Microsoft Windows up to and including Windows Me. FAT as it applies to flexible/floppy and optical disk cartridges (FAT12 and FAT16 without LFN support) has been standardized as ECMA-107 and ISO/IEC 9293.

    The FAT file system is relatively uncomplicated, and is supported by virtually all existing operating systems for personal computers. This ubiquity makes it an ideal format for floppy disks and solid-state memory cards, and a convenient way of sharing data between disparate operating systems installed on the same computer (a dual boot environment).

    The most common implementations have a serious drawback in that when files are deleted and new files written to the media, their fragments tend to become scattered over the entire media, making reading and writing a slow process. Defragmentation is one solution to this, but is often a lengthy process in itself and has to be performed regularly to keep the FAT file system clean.

    You can get more info at

    http://www.ntfs.com/ntfs_vs_fat.htm

    if u find my reply appropriate then please mark it as an answer.

    Friday, March 9, 2007 6:28 AM

All replies

  • These are the different file formats that OS support. They cant be explained in a word or two.. U can refer MSDN and digit-life for more reference..
    Friday, March 9, 2007 5:49 AM
  • NTFS or New Technology File System is the standard file system of Windows NT and its descendants Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, and Windows Vista.

    NTFS replaced Microsoft's previous FAT file system, used in MS-DOS and early versions of Windows. NTFS has several improvements over FAT such as improved support for metadata and the use of advanced data structures to improve performance, reliability, and disk space utilization plus additional extensions such as security access control lists and file system journaling. The exact specification is a trade secret, although (since NTFS v3.00) it can be licensed commercially from Microsoft through their Intellectual Property Licensing program.

    NTFS has five versions:

    • v1.0
    • v1.1
    • v1.2 found in NT 3.51 and NT 4
    • v3.0 found in Windows 2000
    • v3.1 found in Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, and Windows Vista

    These final three versions are sometimes referred to as v5.0, v5.1, and v6.0, after the version of Windows with which they ship. Each newer version added extra features, for example Windows 2000 introduced quotas.

    File Allocation Table (FAT) is a partially patented file system developed by Microsoft for MS-DOS and is the primary file system for consumer versions of Microsoft Windows up to and including Windows Me. FAT as it applies to flexible/floppy and optical disk cartridges (FAT12 and FAT16 without LFN support) has been standardized as ECMA-107 and ISO/IEC 9293.

    The FAT file system is relatively uncomplicated, and is supported by virtually all existing operating systems for personal computers. This ubiquity makes it an ideal format for floppy disks and solid-state memory cards, and a convenient way of sharing data between disparate operating systems installed on the same computer (a dual boot environment).

    The most common implementations have a serious drawback in that when files are deleted and new files written to the media, their fragments tend to become scattered over the entire media, making reading and writing a slow process. Defragmentation is one solution to this, but is often a lengthy process in itself and has to be performed regularly to keep the FAT file system clean.

    You can get more info at

    http://www.ntfs.com/ntfs_vs_fat.htm

    if u find my reply appropriate then please mark it as an answer.

    Friday, March 9, 2007 6:28 AM