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WD Advanced Format Drives e.g. WD20EARS RRS feed

  • Question

  • Has anyone had any experience with the "WD Adanced Format Drives with Home Server Service Pack 3? Should the "XP Compatibility" jumper setting be used before installing?
    Thursday, July 15, 2010 11:10 PM

Answers

  • You should not use an Advanced Format drive as your system drive, and you should use the jumper if using one as a data drive.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by JRDEEZ Friday, July 16, 2010 2:44 AM
    Friday, July 16, 2010 1:51 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • You should not use an Advanced Format drive as your system drive, and you should use the jumper if using one as a data drive.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by JRDEEZ Friday, July 16, 2010 2:44 AM
    Friday, July 16, 2010 1:51 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks Ken,  No indeed; it willl not be used as the System Drive and I was fairly sure because of other XP Compatibility points  with Home Server & Service Pack 3, the XP jumper setting on the WD Drive was preferrable for it use as another Data Drive.  I was hoping for and received additional validation.  FYI: With this addition, the total storage on my personally built server will be 4.5 Terabytes.

    John R Dees

     

    Friday, July 16, 2010 2:55 AM
  • I'm using EARS as storage with the 7/8 pin jumpered and they are fine.  Also look into this: WDIDLE3, a dos program, to address the high load/unload cycles that are part of the WD's power-saving functionality. If you fail to do this the heads will park after 8 secs - repeatedly. Google WDIDLE3 and start reading bro. By the way, currently I have 25.5TB raw storage on my WHS, so you have so work to do.
    Tuesday, July 27, 2010 4:37 PM
  • Thanks for the advice. The drive is currently working reasonably well with the jumper in the 7-8 position.  I will look up the DOS WDIDL3 utility you mentioned.   

    Yes, from the amount of storage you have attached to your WHS system, I do have a bit of work ahead of me.  You either have a monster case with it all loaded internally or else you have it attached to your WHS system from an external source.  I would appreciate a quick note on how you have the hardware (disks) phsyically configured and attached to your WHS system.  Thanks for any information you could provide.

    JD

     

    Tuesday, July 27, 2010 9:20 PM
  • There are two ways to approach this. One is to set up a SAN, and use iSCSI to connect storage from your storage server to your storage consumer(s). The other way is with direct attached storage (DAS). Windows Home Server doesn't support iSCSI, so you'll use a DAS chassis, usually 3U or 4U, with around 12 to 16 drive bays. Then you'll connect it to your server using an SAS adapter. The whole thing (server plus external chassis) will occupy around 8U in a standard rack.

    It will also sound like a small jet. One that's sitting right there next to you in the home theater, if that's where your server is. So put your rack in your basement. :)

    Also note that backing up the data on a server with this much storage will be an absolute nightmare for a consumer. If you've got 25 TB of storage, even if you've turned duplication on for everything, you've still got around 12 TB of data to back up and get off-site. That's a lot of external drives.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Wednesday, July 28, 2010 12:11 AM
    Moderator
  • I have four external four drive DAS units connected using eSata port mulitplier; the HBA is a PCI-X card with four ports. Works great for WHS. We use FC SAN at work, that was my inspiration.  My set-up is much cheaper.   USB 3 units should be out in the near future if not yet, they should be fast enough for WHS. On the other hand, some eSata units might hit closeout prices shortly, good time to buy.
    Wednesday, July 28, 2010 1:47 AM