none
I have been contacted via email and requested to complete a Microsoft Deployment Summary, is this a scam or is this a valid Microsoft request.

    Question

  • For several weeks now my client has been receiving emails from a person claiming to be a consultant for Microsoft. This person is requesting that my client fill out this elaborate spreadsheet which is titled, "Deployment Summary". I have been working IT for almost 20 years and have never encountered anything of this nature before now. My instincts say not to trust this person and to ignore this request.  

    I have searched the web and read many different responses to the question on if this is or is not a scam but have not been able to find a clear answer. 

    Some of the tech sites mention the possibility of this being a legit request, yet some of the forums mention that it is a scam. 

    Is there an authoritative source for a clear answer?  Can anyone provide the definitive answer to this situation?


    Richard Tamboli

    Friday, March 03, 2017 10:01 PM

Answers

  • Richard,

    Think of it this way:

    Whats gonna happen if you delete it and ignore it?  If its legit, at some point Microsoft would contact your client in other ways.  If its a scam, you did the right thing.

    Whats gonna happen if you reply?  If its legit, Microsoft would probably STILL contact your client in other ways.  If its a scam, there is no going back and all that info is screwed.

    Put those ways, your best bet is clearly the ignore route.

    Andrew

    P.S.  I say this because I actually receive emails similar to that from Microsoft that are actually legit... and... I receive them that are fake.  I generally wait until Microsoft calls or contacts me further, often using a backup email address I have provided, but occasionally a phone.  However, I would still lean towards them being fake.

    • Marked as answer by Ricit Tuesday, March 07, 2017 12:00 PM
    Friday, March 03, 2017 10:44 PM

All replies

  • Hi Ricit.

    Your client should check all the email message's headers to verify where and who that message is coming from.
    As far as I know, Microsoft does not send that kind of request and that spreadsheet could even contain a macro virus: if you client does not know that person, the obvious suggestion is to ignore that message and delete it.
    You can always contact Microsoft Support at https://support.microsoft.com/en-us and have the correct information about that.

    Bye.


    Luigi Bruno
    MCP, MCTS, MOS, MTA

    Friday, March 03, 2017 10:04 PM
    Moderator
  • Microsoft does send out licensing and compliance validations.

    I have been working with many customers who have had licensing checks to validate if there purchases are complaint with Microsoft license agreements. This check exists of filling out a MS excel spread sheet with all your licensed products and counts.

    If you are in doubt that this is not a valid MS compliance review contact your local MS license support and validate the requestor.


    MCSA exchange 2016 | MCTS exchange 2013 | MCTS-MCITP exchange 2010 | MCTS-MCITP Exchange: 2007 | MCSA Messaging: 2003 | MCP windows 2000

    Friday, March 03, 2017 10:19 PM
  • For several weeks now my client has been receiving emails from a person claiming to be a consultant for Microsoft. This person is requesting that my client fill out this elaborate spreadsheet which is titled, "Deployment Summary". I have been working IT for almost 20 years and have never encountered anything of this nature before now. My instincts say not to trust this person and to ignore this request.  

    I have searched the web and read many different responses to the question on if this is or is not a scam but have not been able to find a clear answer. 

    Some of the tech sites mention the possibility of this being a legit request, yet some of the forums mention that it is a scam. 

    Is there an authoritative source for a clear answer?  Can anyone provide the definitive answer to this situation?


    Richard Tamboli

    This is what I am talking about. Two responses both have complete opposite advice. I believe that calling Microsoft is most likely the best solution. 

    Thank you for taking the time to respond. 


    Richard Tamboli

    Friday, March 03, 2017 10:32 PM
  • Richard,

    Think of it this way:

    Whats gonna happen if you delete it and ignore it?  If its legit, at some point Microsoft would contact your client in other ways.  If its a scam, you did the right thing.

    Whats gonna happen if you reply?  If its legit, Microsoft would probably STILL contact your client in other ways.  If its a scam, there is no going back and all that info is screwed.

    Put those ways, your best bet is clearly the ignore route.

    Andrew

    P.S.  I say this because I actually receive emails similar to that from Microsoft that are actually legit... and... I receive them that are fake.  I generally wait until Microsoft calls or contacts me further, often using a backup email address I have provided, but occasionally a phone.  However, I would still lean towards them being fake.

    • Marked as answer by Ricit Tuesday, March 07, 2017 12:00 PM
    Friday, March 03, 2017 10:44 PM
  • Afraid there is no forum for this. The only definitive answer can come from Microsoft. Anonymous forums replies would be opinions at best.

    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us

     

     

     



    Regards, Dave Patrick ....
    Microsoft Certified Professional
    Microsoft MVP [Windows Server] Datacenter Management

    Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees, and confers no rights.


    Friday, March 03, 2017 10:44 PM
    Moderator