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  • Question

  • I want to transfer my Windows XP license from my PC to run on my Mac instead using parallels. How do I get the product key to installXP on the Mac. My PC came with XP pre-installed and I don't know how to make the switch
    Friday, July 11, 2008 2:52 PM

Answers

  • Same product, yes, but different licensing agreement.  Microsoft has system builder licensing agreements with companies that build computers.  An OEM Windows license is permanently tied to the very first computer it is installed and activated on.  In addition, the OEM computer manufacturers are responsible for supplying support for their installed OEM version of Windows.  That's just the way it is.

     

    Friday, July 11, 2008 4:12 PM
    Moderator
  • Steve254,

     

    Nothing makes me chuckle more than Mac users complaining about big bad Microsoft's End User Licensing Agreement.

     

    Read your Mac SLA--it's against the SLA to install it on anything that was not made by Apple:

    "This License allows you to install and use one copy of the Apple Software on a single Apple-labeled computer at a time"

     

    That's a much more onerous requirement that anything Microsoft has ever devised for its OSs.

     

    Try the reverse of what you are doing----install OS X_dot_pickyourpussycat on say, a build-your-own PC with modern hardware.  Well, duh, Apple has written OS X so you can't!  (Well, at least not without making it a Hackintosh).

     

    And, no, writing "Apple®" on a Post-It® note and sticking it on your Hackintosh does NOT make it an "Apple-labeled" computer!

    Friday, July 11, 2008 4:41 PM
  • steve254,

     

    Thank you for visiting the Microsoft Genuine Advantage Forum.  The purpose of this forum is the support of Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA) program.  Your question is off topic as well as outside my area of knowledge. As Carey mentioned earlier, there are two types of licenses for XP that consumers will encounter, retail (aka full packaged product), and OEM (original equipment manufacturer).

     

    Retail licenses may be moved from one computer to another, as long as the license is activated on one computer at a time and as long as the previous installation of the license is removed from the previously licensed computer.

     

    OEM licenses for XP are tied to the first computer onto which they are installed and the license is not permitted to be moved on any other computer.  For the purposes of defining what a computer is, since a computer is really just a collection of parts, Microsoft has established that the motherboard is the base or "defining" component, and the OEM license is permanently tied to the motherboard.

     

    Please visit the licensing website for Microsoft for further details on the EULA of the Windows XP product. 

    -For Licensing questions : http://www.microsoft.com/resources/sam/what_basics_licensingWhat.mspx
                                                 
    http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/mplahome.mspx
                                                 
    http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/default.mspx

     

    Lori MS

     

    Friday, July 11, 2008 5:44 PM

All replies

  • Sorry, but a preinstalled OEM license for Windows XP cannot be transferred to a different computer.  Only a "Retail Version" license can be transferred.

     

    Friday, July 11, 2008 3:12 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks for such a quick response but why is this the case. It seems more than a little unjust for Microsoft to make me pay twice for the same product!
    Friday, July 11, 2008 3:26 PM
  • Go to Start > Run and type:  WINVER  , and hit enter. Then click on "End-User License Agreement" for answers.


    XP OEM Clarification: http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/oemeula.htm

    Friday, July 11, 2008 3:37 PM
    Moderator
  • I understand: It's not the same product because Microsoft says so!

    It seems that I therefore own the hardware but am only allowed to use the software under terms dictated by MS. No wonder Bill Gates has billions to give away!
    Friday, July 11, 2008 3:49 PM
  • Same product, yes, but different licensing agreement.  Microsoft has system builder licensing agreements with companies that build computers.  An OEM Windows license is permanently tied to the very first computer it is installed and activated on.  In addition, the OEM computer manufacturers are responsible for supplying support for their installed OEM version of Windows.  That's just the way it is.

     

    Friday, July 11, 2008 4:12 PM
    Moderator
  • Steve254,

     

    Nothing makes me chuckle more than Mac users complaining about big bad Microsoft's End User Licensing Agreement.

     

    Read your Mac SLA--it's against the SLA to install it on anything that was not made by Apple:

    "This License allows you to install and use one copy of the Apple Software on a single Apple-labeled computer at a time"

     

    That's a much more onerous requirement that anything Microsoft has ever devised for its OSs.

     

    Try the reverse of what you are doing----install OS X_dot_pickyourpussycat on say, a build-your-own PC with modern hardware.  Well, duh, Apple has written OS X so you can't!  (Well, at least not without making it a Hackintosh).

     

    And, no, writing "Apple®" on a Post-It® note and sticking it on your Hackintosh does NOT make it an "Apple-labeled" computer!

    Friday, July 11, 2008 4:41 PM
  • steve254,

     

    Thank you for visiting the Microsoft Genuine Advantage Forum.  The purpose of this forum is the support of Windows Genuine Advantage (WGA) program.  Your question is off topic as well as outside my area of knowledge. As Carey mentioned earlier, there are two types of licenses for XP that consumers will encounter, retail (aka full packaged product), and OEM (original equipment manufacturer).

     

    Retail licenses may be moved from one computer to another, as long as the license is activated on one computer at a time and as long as the previous installation of the license is removed from the previously licensed computer.

     

    OEM licenses for XP are tied to the first computer onto which they are installed and the license is not permitted to be moved on any other computer.  For the purposes of defining what a computer is, since a computer is really just a collection of parts, Microsoft has established that the motherboard is the base or "defining" component, and the OEM license is permanently tied to the motherboard.

     

    Please visit the licensing website for Microsoft for further details on the EULA of the Windows XP product. 

    -For Licensing questions : http://www.microsoft.com/resources/sam/what_basics_licensingWhat.mspx
                                                 
    http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/mplahome.mspx
                                                 
    http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/default.mspx

     

    Lori MS

     

    Friday, July 11, 2008 5:44 PM