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Is There a release day for Windows Home Server RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi Forum

    Does anyone know if there is any rumour when

    the product is released, I think it had been Beta

    for a very long time

    Thursday, December 9, 2010 7:23 PM

Answers

  • Hi Forum

    Does anyone know if there is any rumour when

    the product is released, I think it had been Beta

    for a very long time


    Microsoft has already answered this, at least as much of an answer as I think you'll get until shortly before release (like days at the most): H1 2011.

    As for how long it's been in beta, not as long as Windows 7, not nearly as long as Vista.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Thursday, December 9, 2010 7:36 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi Forum

    Does anyone know if there is any rumour when

    the product is released, I think it had been Beta

    for a very long time


    Microsoft has already answered this, at least as much of an answer as I think you'll get until shortly before release (like days at the most): H1 2011.

    As for how long it's been in beta, not as long as Windows 7, not nearly as long as Vista.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Thursday, December 9, 2010 7:36 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi Ken

    Thanks for the quick reply, I will look forward to the final version

    Maybe I'll get It before on my MSDN-account

    Thanks

     

    Bjarne Hansen

    MCP MCTS MCITP

    Friday, December 10, 2010 12:49 PM
  • I encourage you to pay for the software you use. MSDN software is not for use in production (please read the terms of use if you don't believe me), so technically using your MSDN software in your home (as opposed to installing it specifically for purposes of development and testing) is software piracy. Microsoft is unlikely to hunt you down for it, admittedly, but there's still the question of ethics …

    Also, MSDN installations don't reflect on the bottom line for Windows Home Server. I have no specific information on this, but it wouldn't surprise me if low sales of Windows Home Server are a significant contributing factor to the decision to remove Drive Extender from the product. This decision won't be likely to result in much pain for small businesses that will buy the business SKUs, but the drive pool is a really cool feature for consumers.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Friday, December 10, 2010 1:55 PM
    Moderator
  • If you don't use the software in your home then how are you supposed to test and help develop it?  Isn't real world application the best way to test?
    Wednesday, December 15, 2010 11:07 PM
  • If you don't use the software in your home then how are you supposed to test and help develop it?  Isn't real world application the best way to test?

    In a word: no. "Use" doesn't have the same meaning as "test", especially not if you aren't actually, say, developing an add-in. Out of the (probably) hundreds to thousands of Technet and MSDN users who installed Windows Home Server, I'd bet no more than a handful developed anything for it.

    Though, as I said, I doubt Microsoft is going to hunt anyone down for it. Burn DVDs and sell them and you can expect a visit from some very hungry sharks lawyers, though. :)


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Thursday, December 16, 2010 1:23 AM
    Moderator
  • The TechNet subscription is not solely for testing development projects. I also agree with Higgy06 that often the best, and sometimes the only way to really test a product is to 'use' it in a real world setting. How would a corporation be able to know if they should put out thousands of dollars to upgrade to a certain product if they didn't 'use' that product by means of a TechNet subscription in a real workplace environment. Why else would the TechNet  subscription allow multiple installations of a product.. There is a pretty fine line between 'use' and 'test', and in many instance no line at all.

    Additionally.... the word 'evaluate' comes into the picture. Pretty hard to evaluate something if it is not used (deployed) in a real world setting. :)

    Quote: "Whether you’re focused on Enterprise or Desktop environments, there are different annual subscriptions that offer tailored benefits providing you with the resources and tools to help you be successful. Subscribers can leverage professional support to overcome the toughest IT challenges and stay ahead of the curve with E-Learning courses. Get access to comprehensive Microsoft resources such as full-version software to evaluate, test and deploy confidently."

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/subscriptions/default.aspx

    Art (artfudd) Folden
    ------------------------------


    Art (artfudd) Folden
    ------------------------------
    "Ken Warren [MVP]" wrote in message news:290f800a-553b-47b8-8fa4-a223a035bf5e@communitybridge.codeplex.com...

    If you don't use the software in your home then how are you supposed to test and help develop it?  Isn't real world application the best way to test?

    In a word: no. "Use" doesn't have the same meaning as "test", especially not if you aren't actually, say, developing an add-in. Out of the (probably) hundreds to thousands of TechNet and MSDN users who installed Windows Home Server, I'd bet no more than a handful developed anything for it.

    Though, as I said, I doubt Microsoft is going to hunt anyone down for it. Burn DVDs and sell them and you can expect a visit from some*very* hungry sharks lawyers, though. :)


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)


    Thursday, December 16, 2010 11:46 PM
  • I disagree. It's very easy to tell the difference between "evaluation" and "use". If you subscribe to Technet and install Windows 7 Ultimate on your home theater PC, you aren't evaluating, you're using. And no matter how you try to rationalize it, it's not ethical. You're not going to uninstall it because it doesn't meet your needs, now are you? Nope, you're going to install it on your main desktop, and your laptop, etc.

    Likewise, if you install Windows Home Serve from Technet, and then use it to back up your home computers, centralize storage, serve up your media, etc. you aren't evaluating, you're using. And it's still not ethical.

    Microsoft disagrees with you too, by the way. From the page you linked (emphasis added):

    "TechNet Subscriptions is intended to support software trial and evaluation, versus a production environment."


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Friday, December 17, 2010 2:15 AM
    Moderator
  • Ummm..... let me get this straight... TechNet offers WHS as an evaluation/test operating system? Why? If it is not meant to be evaluated in a 'home' environment, then why offer it via TechNet? Where else would you evaluate a 'home server'?

    Art (artfudd) Folden
    ------------------------------
    "Ken Warren [MVP]" wrote in message news:1965ad4e-b0a7-412d-a7b6-de4362fb04ef@communitybridge.codeplex.com...

    I disagree. It's very easy to tell the difference between "evaluation" and "use". If you subscribe to Technet and install Windows 7 Ultimate on your home theater PC, you aren't evaluating, you're using. And no matter how you try to rationalize it, it's not ethical. You're not going to uninstall it because it doesn't meet your needs, now are you? Nope, you're going to install it on your main desktop, and your laptop, etc.

    Likewise, if you install Windows Home Serve from Technet, and then use it to back up your home computers, centralize storage, serve up your media, etc. you aren't evaluating, you're using. And it's*still* not ethical.

    Microsoft disagrees with you too, by the way. From the page you linked (emphasis added):

    "TechNet Subscriptions is intended to support software trial and evaluation, *versus a production environment.*"


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)


    Art Folden
    Friday, December 17, 2010 3:15 AM
  • "You're not going to uninstall it because it doesn't meet your needs, now
    are you? Nope, you're going to install it on your main desktop, and your
    laptop, etc."

    Don't presume to know how I or anyone else would 'evaluate' a TechNet
    application or operating system. I personally DID uninstall Vail because it
    does NOT currently meet my needs, and presently I do not see that changing.
    However, I never say no either... if changes are made in the next beta drops
    of Vail that make it look like something I can and will use, then I
    certainly will give it another trial and evaluation. You come very close to
    accusing me and anyone else using TechNet evaluation software of being
    thieves. I personally resent that implication.

    "Likewise, if you install Windows Home Serve from Technet, and then use it to back up your home computers, centralize storage, serve up your media, etc. you aren't evaluating, you're using. And it's*still* not ethical."

    Bullsh*t.... Window Home Server is a *home* server... where else would you evaluate and test it. Again... you infer I and others are being unethical. You have no right to make that accusation. Time to climb down from your high and mighty throne Mr. Warren!

    Art (artfudd) Folden
    ------------------------------
    "Ken Warren [MVP]" wrote in message
    news:1965ad4e-b0a7-412d-a7b6-de4362fb04ef@communitybridge.codeplex.com...

    I disagree. It's very easy to tell the difference between "evaluation" and
    "use". If you subscribe to TechNet and install Windows 7 Ultimate on your
    home theater PC, you aren't evaluating, you're using. And no matter how you
    try to rationalize it, it's not ethical. You're not going to uninstall it
    because it doesn't meet your needs, now are you? Nope, you're going to
    install it on your main desktop, and your laptop, etc.

    Likewise, if you install Windows Home Serve from Technet, and then use it to
    back up your home computers, centralize storage, serve up your media, etc.
    you aren't evaluating, you're using. And it's*still* not ethical.

    Microsoft disagrees with you too, by the way. From the page you linked
    (emphasis added):

    "TechNet Subscriptions is intended to support software trial and evaluation,
    *versus a production environment.*"


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)


    Art Folden
    Friday, December 17, 2010 3:33 AM
  • Art, many people choose to rationalize their years of use of Technet or MSDN software as "extended evaluation". That rationalization doesn't hold water with me, I'm afraid, particularly not with a product like Windows Home Server, which just about anyone should be able to evaluate fully in a couple of weeks (there really isn't much to it, after all). Rationalization or no, I still think it's unethical to use Technet or MSDN software this way. If that makes you uncomfortable, I'm sorry but I still think it's unethical.

    As for theft, that would be a matter for lawyers and the courts to decide.

    (Note that MSDN includes some software for production use; specifics vary by subscription level but no operating systems are ever included.)


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Friday, December 17, 2010 2:14 PM
    Moderator
  • On Fri, 17 Dec 2010 14:14:35 +0000, Ken Warren [MVP] wrote:

    (Note that MSDN includes some software for production use; specifics vary by subscription level but no operating systems are ever included.)

    Not true. Certified partners are allowed to use MSDN software, including
    OS' for running their businesses.


    Paul Adare
    MVP - Identity Lifecycle Manager
    http://www.identit.ca

    Friday, December 17, 2010 2:27 PM
  • True enough, Paul (Microsoft is reorganizing partnership and subscription levels, I believe), but:

    • It's pretty much completely beyond the reach of the individual enthusiast, and
    • It's not part of the MSDN subscription, it's part of the partner "internal use licensing" benefit, and
    • Not all Microsoft products are available via the "internal use" licensing (and in particular Windows Home Server isn't on the list).

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Friday, December 17, 2010 3:21 PM
    Moderator
  • I think the "Certified partners" carries more weight in the equation
    than just an MSDN subscription, for the rest of us, we can't use MSDN
    software for day to day operations except for some pretty specific
    exceptions.
     
     
     

    Bob Comer - Microsoft MVP Virtual Machine
    Friday, December 17, 2010 3:28 PM
  • I had not understood your view or even heard it from anyone else until now.  I must say (as did you) that MSFT won't bother anyone using MSFT Tech Plus for production, especially because it costs a few hundred dollars a year--not cheap by almost any standard.  My question is:  Why should anyone have to pay so much to test a product before they make a purchase?  And testing an OS is not something that can be accomplished in a few days or weeks.  Contrary to your opinion regarding what is ethical, Ken, and what is not, I'll bet that MSFT is quite happy to have so many subscribers for its "evaluation" services.

    Bill

    Saturday, December 18, 2010 10:38 PM
  • I had not understood your view or even heard it from anyone else until now.  I must say (as did you) that MSFT won't bother anyone using MSFT Tech Plus for production, especially because it costs a few hundred dollars a year--not cheap by almost any standard.  My question is:  Why should anyone have to pay so much to test a product before they make a purchase?  And testing an OS is not something that can be accomplished in a few days or weeks.  Contrary to your opinion regarding what is ethical, Ken, and what is not, I'll bet that MSFT is quite happy to have so many subscribers for its "evaluation" services.

    Bill

    Bill,
    1. A Technet subscription costs less than Microsoft Office 2010 (go check the prices, I'll wait), and vastly less than Windows Server 2008 R2.
    2. Cost for testing: You can test just about any Microsoft OS for free. Install it without activating and you get 30 days. This is probably not really sufficient for evaluating a new desktop OS for a company-wide upgrade (what about legacy apps? What about incompatibilities with external tools? What about just plain bugs?), but it's likely to be adequate for an individual planning to use it on a couple of PCs at home. And Windows Home Server isn't as complex as your typical desktop OS.
      In addition, Microsoft has virtual machine demos of a lot of their server and other products. In many cases, you can probably get a good idea of whether it's worth consideration just from a few hours with one of those VMs.
    3. As far as satisfaction with the number of Technet subscribers, I can't tell you how Technet and MSDN feel about it. (Probably happy; they keep raising the prices anyway.) I can tell you that an installation from Technet or MSDN isn't going to reflect on the bottom line for the HSBS team. They don't get any of the subscription profit, and if that installation is used for production it's a lost sale, just like pirated software. (Microsoft can get a good estimate of Technet/MSDN installations in their SQM data, just as they can illegal installations, though they can't identify an individual).
    As I said to Art, I don't care how someone rationalizes their production use of an evaluation tool in violation of their agreement with Microsoft (and I can think of half a dozen arguments off the top of my head; just look at the justifications used by individuals who pirate software for personal use for a few samples), it's unethical. And if that makes someone unhappy, I'm sorry that person is unhappy, but it's still unethical. 

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Sunday, December 19, 2010 12:10 AM
    Moderator
  • Ken: with all due respect, please stop replying to this thread concerning TechNet subscribers.  I understand if this as gotten off course, but, as a reminder the original thread is "Is There a release day for Windows Home Server".

    Sunday, December 19, 2010 1:01 AM
  • Ken, I do agree with you on this matter.  I'm a computer systems integrator and specialize on medium sized applications.  We have MDSN subscriptions and our rules are that we use MSDN software only on prototype environments only.  When we decide to take a system into production, we build a system with production software.  Home use of MSDN software is not considered appropriate.

    Since Drive Extender has been removed from WHS2 production, will the BETA allow the use of RAID controllers like the Promise FastTrack?  When I tried to use it on WHS1, it complained.  I had to use a passive RAID1 card to get RAID1 working on WHS1.  Does anybody have experience with using hardware RAID controllers on WHS2 beta?


    ~Cliff
    Monday, December 20, 2010 3:20 PM
  • Using hardware RAID controllers won't be supported by Microsoft (Microsoft doesn't support hardware other than Microsoft-branded hardware :) ). However, I expect with the removal of DE, it won't be as adamantly "unsupported" as RAID with V1. After all, users with a desire for local data protection/high availability will need to be able to do something, and Microsoft has already said (I think, check the HSBS blog postss) that RAID will be an option for OEMs.

    Your issues with V1 are most likely due to not getting the correct drivers at the correct time, by the way.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Monday, December 20, 2010 4:37 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi Ken

    I will buy it, Right now I running the current version WHS

    It was a present from our sales-team.

    maybe They are nice to me again.

    Monday, February 28, 2011 10:02 PM
  • I was using the Windows 2003 driver and WHS1 knew about it because it detected the RAID controller and shutdown the installation with a message that RAID controllers were not supported.  I'm going to try again with WHS2011.

    Thanks,

    Cliff


    ~Cliff
    Monday, February 28, 2011 11:48 PM
  • I could see that this thread has not yet given recent answers about the release date of 2011. Any idea? I had a look at it and I like server r2 2008. In plain install it is a "very" basic product. I guess they rely on add ons like the two drive extenders being produced right now. (I loved this and the back ups the two core features to me) How MS can't get that going and these guys magically can is amazing and why MS is such a confusing company indeed! They are so often their own worst enemy. Back to the question at hand, when and how much? 
    Thursday, March 3, 2011 9:38 PM