locked
active directory 2003 RRS feed

  • Question

  • What is the difference between an ou and a group\?? I am new ti this....
    Monday, January 11, 2010 8:52 PM

Answers

  • Organizational units (OU)

    A particularly useful type of directory object contained within domains is the organizational unit. Organizational units are Active Directory containers into which you can place users, groups, computers, and other organizational units. An organizational unit cannot contain objects from other domains. An organizational unit is the smallest scope or unit to which you can assign Group Policy settings or delegate administrative authority. Using organizational units, you can create containers within a domain that represent the hierarchical, logical structures within your organization. You can then manage the configuration and use of accounts and resources based on your organizational model.

    You can use organizational units to create an administrative model that can be scaled to any size. A user can have administrative authority for all organizational units in a domain or for a single organizational unit. An administrator of an organizational unit does not need to have administrative authority for any other organizational units in the domain.

    Groups

    A group is a collection of user and computer accounts, contacts and other groups that can be managed as a single unit. Users and computers that belong to a particular group are referred to as group members. Using groups can simplify administration by assigning a common set of permissions and rights to many accounts at once, rather than assigning permissions and rights to each account individually. Groups can be either directory-based or local to a particular computer. Groups in Active Directory are directory objects that reside within a domain and organizational unit container objects. Active Directory provides a set of default groups upon installation, and also allows the option to create groups.

    Groups in Active Directory allow you to:

    • Simplify administration by assigning permissions on a shared resource to a group, rather than to individual users. This assigns the same access on the resource to all members of that group.
    • Delegate administration by assigning user rights once to a group through Group Policy, and then adding necessary members to the group that you want to have the same rights as the group.
    • Create e-mail distribution lists.
    • Proposed as answer by Rubel Khan Tuesday, January 12, 2010 2:11 AM
    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Thursday, January 14, 2010 9:22 PM
    Monday, January 11, 2010 10:59 PM

All replies

  • Organizational units (OU)

    A particularly useful type of directory object contained within domains is the organizational unit. Organizational units are Active Directory containers into which you can place users, groups, computers, and other organizational units. An organizational unit cannot contain objects from other domains. An organizational unit is the smallest scope or unit to which you can assign Group Policy settings or delegate administrative authority. Using organizational units, you can create containers within a domain that represent the hierarchical, logical structures within your organization. You can then manage the configuration and use of accounts and resources based on your organizational model.

    You can use organizational units to create an administrative model that can be scaled to any size. A user can have administrative authority for all organizational units in a domain or for a single organizational unit. An administrator of an organizational unit does not need to have administrative authority for any other organizational units in the domain.

    Groups

    A group is a collection of user and computer accounts, contacts and other groups that can be managed as a single unit. Users and computers that belong to a particular group are referred to as group members. Using groups can simplify administration by assigning a common set of permissions and rights to many accounts at once, rather than assigning permissions and rights to each account individually. Groups can be either directory-based or local to a particular computer. Groups in Active Directory are directory objects that reside within a domain and organizational unit container objects. Active Directory provides a set of default groups upon installation, and also allows the option to create groups.

    Groups in Active Directory allow you to:

    • Simplify administration by assigning permissions on a shared resource to a group, rather than to individual users. This assigns the same access on the resource to all members of that group.
    • Delegate administration by assigning user rights once to a group through Group Policy, and then adding necessary members to the group that you want to have the same rights as the group.
    • Create e-mail distribution lists.
    • Proposed as answer by Rubel Khan Tuesday, January 12, 2010 2:11 AM
    • Marked as answer by Rubel Khan Thursday, January 14, 2010 9:22 PM
    Monday, January 11, 2010 10:59 PM
  • hi ittech1007 ,

                         Check these useful links.

    http://searchwindowsserver.techtarget.com/tip/0,289483,sid68_gci809323,00.html

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc978003.aspx

    http://www.informit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=30903

    http://www.comptechdoc.org/os/windows/win2k/win2kadobjects.html

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organizational_Unit
    Thank You
    • Proposed as answer by TapanPattanaik Tuesday, January 12, 2010 11:03 AM
    Tuesday, January 12, 2010 11:03 AM