locked
Adding Second Hard Drive for WAMP Server RRS feed

  • Question

  • I originally started with a 500Gb hard drive and the "automagic" installation set up all the defaults.  I had tried a couple times to get a good working version of "Mediawiki" installed but, with no great success.
    I have been playing with WAMP (Windows, Apache, MySQL, and PHP) server setups on a notebook for tracking work issues (Joomla, Mediawiki).  I have added a second 500Gb to this WHS for a full Terabyte.
    Question: Can I add the drive and not have the WHS add it into the drives it controls?  Can I add the drive as individual directories and shares?  Can this now support a WAMP running these two Apps (Joomla, Mediawiki)? 

    WHS does a good job of keeping my home workstation, my test system, and my working notebook backed up but, as a web/app development server...hmmm.  I can add second server but why add more cost to my household bill for electrical service.

    Thursday, February 26, 2009 8:51 PM

Answers

  • There is a philosophical question there, and a practical question.

    So the practical question: can you add a drive that Windows Home Server doesn't control? Yes. In any situation where you are planning to install large amounts of software, databases, or do heavy file transvers using tools other than WHS functionality, it's even advisable to do so. It is, however, unsupported; by design WHS will control all installed hardware.

    Which brings the philosophical question: should you? I'm not going to answer that one, but consider a few things: 

    Windows Home Server isn't designed to be "Windows Server 2003 Lite". It's designed to do a few things, to do them simply and well, and to be easy for someone without any significant amount of technical skill to bring home and set up (in the form of an HP MediaSmart Server or the like, not as software for installation on one's own hardware).

    In addition to the above, when you do extensive configuration using traditional server tools (Disk Management, changing IIS settings, etc.) you run a risk of causing problems for Windows Home Server. WHS expects that the operating environment will be configured in a particular way; since it's a fairly "closed" system it's unlikely that most users will change anything about that so you never know when some seemingly innocent modification will cause a problem. Also, those modifications will not be preserved if you find yourself needing to reinstall WHS.

    So it will be up to you to determine if it's appropriate to put together a WAMP implementation on your server. I'm pretty sure others have done so successfully, but there are probably some pitfalls that you'll run into along the way. In addition you should be cautious, and protect your data (regular backups off the server would be a good plan) until everything is working properly.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Thursday, February 26, 2009 10:13 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Twice now I have added in Dynamic drives that have been recognized as just that. I did so in order to pull files from. On each of these drives they did not automatically become a part of the environment. If I wanted them too, then I have to add them through the admin console for home server. In addition, those drives would then get re-formatted and wiped.

    Have no idea what happens with a new drive. Since you have access to the regular server desktop, I would just install to the root and go from there. At least that's my own plan when I get finished migrating all of my data from other boxes.... Can't see where a WAMP would break anything regarding home server. Of course I am certain someone is going to come back with.. "Not supported," Blah blah.

    --Joe


    Thursday, February 26, 2009 9:40 PM
  • BTW - Because WHS is running IIS, you'll have to either use IIS in conjunction with PHP/MySQl or configure Apache to run on another port besides 80. Maybe 8080 instead.
    Thursday, February 26, 2009 9:55 PM
  • There is a philosophical question there, and a practical question.

    So the practical question: can you add a drive that Windows Home Server doesn't control? Yes. In any situation where you are planning to install large amounts of software, databases, or do heavy file transvers using tools other than WHS functionality, it's even advisable to do so. It is, however, unsupported; by design WHS will control all installed hardware.

    Which brings the philosophical question: should you? I'm not going to answer that one, but consider a few things: 

    Windows Home Server isn't designed to be "Windows Server 2003 Lite". It's designed to do a few things, to do them simply and well, and to be easy for someone without any significant amount of technical skill to bring home and set up (in the form of an HP MediaSmart Server or the like, not as software for installation on one's own hardware).

    In addition to the above, when you do extensive configuration using traditional server tools (Disk Management, changing IIS settings, etc.) you run a risk of causing problems for Windows Home Server. WHS expects that the operating environment will be configured in a particular way; since it's a fairly "closed" system it's unlikely that most users will change anything about that so you never know when some seemingly innocent modification will cause a problem. Also, those modifications will not be preserved if you find yourself needing to reinstall WHS.

    So it will be up to you to determine if it's appropriate to put together a WAMP implementation on your server. I'm pretty sure others have done so successfully, but there are probably some pitfalls that you'll run into along the way. In addition you should be cautious, and protect your data (regular backups off the server would be a good plan) until everything is working properly.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Thursday, February 26, 2009 10:13 PM
    Moderator
  • That was one of the best posts I have ever read.  Thoughtful and concise.  It makes my response, pale.

    Thank You.

    From your explanation, I am going to try an work a WAMP installation on the second drive.  I simply do not have the IIS touch and can work with Apache fairly well.  This box is not going to do "heavy lifting" but, provide me with a place to constructed "blog" information on problems being analyzed at work away from the business infrastructure.  I understand "Joomla" and MediaWiki".  I am not a real fan of "Share Point".

    My "carbon foot print" would be well exaggerated by the additional servers engaged to perform duties from print server to web to backup system if each had it's own box.  But again, no heavy lifting, just a place to keep and share some obersations, ramblings, and ideas.

    Thank You

     

    Thursday, March 5, 2009 10:08 PM
  • I gave a go at this for a couple hours last week and have not returned back to it yet.

    In effect, even if I pointed Apache server to another port, it interfered with IIS. Even after opening the port in the firewall, after opening the port on my router. I set it aside while I went about continuing to move my data and so forth. I'll give it another go this weekend myself.

    However, I do want to point something out. You can utilize a simple thumb drive for a WAMP/XAMPP server. I own a small web/dev firm and we utilize Joomla for most of our small business sites. I keep a server alive on my thumb drive, along with a Portable Apps installation (www.portableapps.com). By doing so, i can dev on Joomla anywhere and when done, pack it up to my web servers.

    You may find it easier to deal with rather than poking around WHS and so forth.

    --Joe
    Friday, March 6, 2009 1:54 PM