locked
System Builders License: hardware upgrades RRS feed

  • Question

  • ... certain hardware upgrades such as the motherboard constitute a new *PC*.  In contrast... ...replacing a failed motherboard, even if the replacement isn't the same make/model, is accepted within the terms of the OEM license agreement. 

     

    This actually made sense to me when OEM software was always sold with the hardware and the hardware was proprietary and limited in its upgradeability.  Now add in a System Builders License, which "isn't really intended to be installed by end-users", but does allow for someone to build their own PC and become their own avenue of support.  To me, this automatically increases the likely hood that upgrades will occur.

     

    With consideration to licensing alone, I'm confused at how any hardware replacement could constitute a *new PC*.  In my opinion a *new PC* is having a complete PC in relation to what can still be referenced as the original PC.   More importantly, you have created the possibility that one license could be used in multiple locations.  If the System Builders license fits the mold of having to purchase a new license because of major hardware upgrades then why didn't Microsoft just stick with OEM? 

     

    Some of us are on the fence about Vista (excluding performance and compatibility).  Maybe we want the ultimate version, we don't want to pay the $399 price tag, we know we can support ourselves (or at least google will save us in the end) and we still want to adhere to Microsoft licensing terms.  An article such as http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,248704,00.html strikes hope and gives some clarification to a DIY person, such as myself, and then at the end you see the comments from a system builder about committing piracy because you have upgraded the motherboard and reactivated over the phone....

     

    While I feel that a system builders license does constitute OEM in that it implies that a PC is being built, I think the attached OEM license restrictions (as I have interpreted them) could use adjustment.

     

    Is there any clarification in this regard?

     

    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 6:17 AM

Answers

  • ArmedBlade,

     

    No clarification needed, as you certainly understand the provisions of the OEM End User Licensing Agreement better than about 50% of systembuilders and 99.9% of End Users.

    • Marked as answer by JeniferA Thursday, September 11, 2008 6:55 PM
    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 1:47 PM

All replies

  • ArmedBlade,

     

    No clarification needed, as you certainly understand the provisions of the OEM End User Licensing Agreement better than about 50% of systembuilders and 99.9% of End Users.

    • Marked as answer by JeniferA Thursday, September 11, 2008 6:55 PM
    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 1:47 PM
  • Sorry about the enormous bump, but I stumbled across this post as I was searching for information regarding exactly this.

    So let me ask this:  As a serious DIYer who frequently updates major system components like the motherboard and processor and RAM (and the list goes on), am I quite simply (pardon my language) going to be shafted by Microsoft if I buy the OEM System Builders Ultimate DVD?  I've even got a new motherboard lined up to be purchased, but if buying Microsoft Windows means that I can never upgrade my computer again, I'll stay away, thanks.

    I KNOW for a fact that I can provide myself my own support (because I give support to others, too), and I can do everything maintenance and support related myself.  If upgrading my motherboard will void my license agreement, I'd be very upset at Microsoft.


    With that said, apparently, upgrading major components of my system DOES violate my EULA, and so I am therefore, very upset at Microsoft.
    Can someone explain WHY a new system component constitues a new PC?  For myself (and I believe a VERY large number of other PC enthusiasts), I have NEVER bought a new PC.  I simply, and slowly, upgrade each part as they are needed.

    This sounds to me like Microsoft is just trying to make me buy their software over and over again.  I'll admit that I'll never switch to Apple (rest easy, o Microsoft advertiser), but let's be honest, there ARE other ways of getting the Microsoft OS.  I'm trying to do it the legal way here, and it sounds like I'm just going to get screwed in a few months when I upgrade.

    -rockerest
    --quite disappointed by my understanding
    Tuesday, September 16, 2008 10:07 PM