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Exam 70-536 RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    For the Exam 70-536 exam and also other MCTS exams, should I know both C# and VB.net or I can choose one of them? Also do you know any good training class around orange county, CA area.

     

    Thanks.

    Wednesday, July 21, 2010 4:56 PM

Answers

  • Hi,
     
    You can choose when you take the exam. As a general career move, it may
    be useful to know both of them. Someone else will need to comment on the
    classes near OC, as I am in CO...
     

    -- Mike Burr
    Wednesday, July 21, 2010 5:09 PM

All replies

  • Hi,
     
    You can choose when you take the exam. As a general career move, it may
    be useful to know both of them. Someone else will need to comment on the
    classes near OC, as I am in CO...
     

    -- Mike Burr
    Wednesday, July 21, 2010 5:09 PM
  • Hi,

    For the Exam 70-536 exam and also other MCTS exams, should I know both C# and VB.net or I can choose one of them? Also do you know any good training class around orange county, CA area.

     

    Thanks.

    I live in OC Ca.  I have an ICS degree from UCI, albeit several years old.

    Through the California EDD, I was able to qualify for a (federal) WIA grant.  Part of the process was to evaluate 3 WIB approved schools.  This was in January, 2009.  At that time, one was no longer in OC, another (in Fullerton right off the 57) was closing down its MCSD program (since MCSD "retired" April 1, 2009) and was not going to offer training for MCTS (that replaced MCSD).  The 3rd offered a 3 day class room course for 2956 "Core Foundations" and a 2nd 3 day course for "Advanced Foundations" as prescribed by the Microsoft Official Courses for .NET Development.  The 2 textbooks, combined, is a little over 1 thousand pages.  There are 6 modules in 2956 and 8 modules in 2957.  Each module has a "lab" consisting of 3 - 5 program "components" you are supposed to write.   Each "lab" is supposed to take 1 - 3 hours.

    So lets summarize: 6 days x 8 hours = 48 hours to cover 1,000 pages of textbook material and "review" 14 labs that may require 14 - 42 hours to complete.  Do you see a problem here?

    Basically, the classes are a start.  For me, even when I knew what I was doing, it took me more than an a couple of hours just to complete 1 component in the lab.  And what about when I didn't know what I was doing and was "learning" while I was doing the labs.  You're going to have to determine for yourself how fast you learn the material and do the practice programming.

    In addition to the woefully inadequate instructor led classes, they do offer a "self-paced mentored lab" experience.  Each lab station has 2 screens connected to a networked computer.  I found the 2 screens indispensable.  Their lab environment is excellent for studying.  If something goes wrong, and something always did every so often, there was someone their to get you back on track.  However there is only 1 "mentor" who is a programmer.  (The others cover the wide array of courses offered by the school.)  Unfortunately he was not scheduled as a lab mentor very often.  (When I've asked, I've gotten various answers none of which actually answer the question of why he is not a lab mentor as much time as the others are.)

    After spending 12 weeks going through the text and doing the each lab fully, I took a "practice test".  I can't remember exactly what my score was but it was around %33.  Ok, so I'm obviously not a fast learner or a good test taker.  But, when one lists the "Skills Measured" on the Microsoft 70-536 Exam site (http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/exam.aspx?ID=70-536&locale=en-us#tab2) against the list of course lessons (material actually in the course) there is a HUGE gap.

    I inquired about this and there are 3 forces at play:

    1.  the school can only offer the "official" Microsoft courses that (by all other accounts I've read and experienced) are woefully inadequate for preparation for the exam.

    2. "experience" is supposed to make up what is lacking in the course material and

    3.  Microsoft makes a point of stating that their exams are not meant to validate course content material, but rather expect a candidate to have (real world) programming experience (again, what Microsoft really wants to test - your overall knowledge, not that you can complete a course and take an exam)

    For me the best training was to take each "technical task" listed and review the MSDN documentation covering each item. (Some cut and pasting note making)  Otherwise, I could not answer any given question from the list of  "skills measured".

     

    Friday, August 13, 2010 11:46 PM