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Not Genuine after partition change RRS feed

  • Pytanie

  • I have Windows 7 Ultimate (not upgrade) and have the DVDs, box and my license code.

    I had XP on my system.  I partitioned my hard drive and ran dual boot for a while.  Now I'm ready to say goodbye to XP.  Here is what I did:

    • Used gparted to delete the XP partition
    • Made the 7 partition the full size
    • Made the 7 partition flagged as boot and restarted
    • - The system would not boot, so I ran the windows repair and restarted
    • System booted into windows 7 and then after logging into 7 I got the following:

    empty blue desktop in classic mode with text in the bottom right saying that windows 7 was not genuine


    I tried repair again with no luck.

    suggestions?
    wtorek, 10 listopada 2009 05:46

Odpowiedzi

  • I fixed my own issue.

    It seems that Win7 does not like changes in partitions outside Windows. 

    After logging into my locked system and saw the blue blank screen here is what I did:

    • Hit control-shift-esc to get the task manager and ran regedit
    • Navigated to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\MountedDevices, backed up and removed the data inside 
    • Rebooted

    upon reboot, the system checked the key again and validated my license!

    ...I hope this helps someone...
    • Oznaczony jako odpowiedź przez Darin Smith MS wtorek, 10 listopada 2009 18:17
    wtorek, 10 listopada 2009 07:42

Wszystkie odpowiedzi

  • I fixed my own issue.

    It seems that Win7 does not like changes in partitions outside Windows. 

    After logging into my locked system and saw the blue blank screen here is what I did:

    • Hit control-shift-esc to get the task manager and ran regedit
    • Navigated to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\MountedDevices, backed up and removed the data inside 
    • Rebooted

    upon reboot, the system checked the key again and validated my license!

    ...I hope this helps someone...
    • Oznaczony jako odpowiedź przez Darin Smith MS wtorek, 10 listopada 2009 18:17
    wtorek, 10 listopada 2009 07:42
  • Hi Jason-g,

      Thank you for taking the time to post back with the steps what resolved your issue!

    Darin MS 
    wtorek, 10 listopada 2009 18:18
  • Hi Jason-g:
    Can you elaborate on the following: "Navigated to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\MountedDevices, backed up and removed the data inside"? I understand how to run regedit and navigate to the key, but "backed up and removed the data inside" is ambiguous. Did you delete the entire "MountedDevices"? Or select all the entries under that key and delete them? Thanks for any advice - this is exactly an issue I posted subsequent to this post.

    tperki
    środa, 11 listopada 2009 16:39
  • Sure.

    • Navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\MountedDevices
    • Right click on 'MountedDevices'
    • choose Export
    • Save to c:\
    • Select all the data inside on the right hand pane except the first one
    • Right click and choose Delete
    • Reboot

    I did not delete the key itself! 

    The data in the key will automatically regenerate.
    środa, 11 listopada 2009 17:08
  • Thank you Jason-g: your solution helped point me in the right direction. Thanks again.
    czwartek, 12 listopada 2009 01:15
  • Thanks for your post.  I am having the exact same problem after moving my W7 partition with gparted. 

    How did you get to REGEDIT?  I ask because when I launch task manager and try to open REGEDIT, it tells me "The specified path does not exist".
    poniedziałek, 23 listopada 2009 07:47
  • Did you resolve your issue Jet?

    I did not do anything special I did.  I just ran regedit from the task manager.  I didn't get the error you described.
    piątek, 4 grudnia 2009 17:12
  • guys,

    I am also having this issue after using gparted to delete the old xp partition and expand the win7 one however, I can not even open task manager to get to regedit, crtl,alt, del does not work

    I was able to get to a cmd prompt and run regedit by using the win7 cd repair menu and delete the entries from the monuteddevices folder but after rebooting the issue persists as when you go to registy it seems that is read only

    I have tried booting in safemode but when i do the keyboard is disabled as it is in bluescreen mode so I can not get to task manager, cmd prompt or anything.

    I am now resigned to taking my hard disk to work on monday copying the files from it taking the disk back home formatting and re-installing windows 7.

    ...what a nightmare!!!
    sobota, 2 stycznia 2010 09:59
  • Thanks for your post.  I am having the exact same problem after moving my W7 partition with gparted. 

    How did you get to REGEDIT?  I ask because when I launch task manager and try to open REGEDIT, it tells me "The specified path does not exist".

    Once at the blue screen, hit CTRL+ALT+DEL, then hit F8 right after your computer's initial boot sequence so you get the windows diagnostic menu.  Choose Safe Mode, then repeat the same steps as above.  In my case, I ran regedt32.exe and in save mode you get the check box to "run this command in a privileged mode" (or something to that effect).  Once in safe mode, I was able to follow the rest of the steps without that "path does not exist" error.

    Hope that helps!!
    środa, 13 stycznia 2010 01:57
  • Thanks! This pointed me in the right direction as well. However, I had to do something slightly different in my case.

    Your case seems to have worked because your windows 7 was installed in C:\, which is the default regenerated drive assignment if you delete the key. However, simply deleting it won't work if C:\ is not where you installed your drive. You'll have to manually fix the drive letters in the registry which is a little more complicated to explain than it really is.

    Here were my steps:
    1) Go to safe mode for windows 7
    2) Go to task manager
    3) On New Task, I clicked "Browse" 
    4) I looked at my computer on the left panel and saw the drive letters. I noticed they were wrong so I remembered what they were supposed to be and what the computer thinks they are.
    5) Following the steps above to reach (running with privileges) HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\MountedDevices, I right clicked on the keys named for example "\DosDevices\:C" and clicked "Rename"
    6) They were named as the incorrect drive assignments. In my case, I renamed one of them to "\DosDevices\N:" -- which was the original drive letter before partitioning.
    7) I rebooted and it all worked again!

    Before I did these steps I had followed the steps above and deleted my old registry values, but since I backed them up, I can now restore them and then go through my manual edit to get them back the same as before (I hope) except with a single key changed. I will be trying this now. If I don't post again, it will mean it didn't cause any problems.
    niedziela, 17 stycznia 2010 22:52
  • Similar to Jason-G's first post, I was originally running Win XP Pro, then made a second partition on one hard drive to install Windows 7.  

    What I noticed on boot after expanding my Win 7 partition, was that my drive letter had now changed from C: to D:.  I think this may have occurred since GParted grew the D partition (formerly XP) and moved data over to it.  All I did was try to resize my C: partition to the max available space... so not sure why it did that, but maybe it was the only way to extend the partition out.  

    To resolve this problem as simply as possible, I followed knowledge in an older Microsoft article - 

    -----------
    Locate the following registry key:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\MountedDevices
    Find the drive letter you want to change to (new). Look for "\DosDevices\C:".
    Right-click \DosDevices\C:, and then click Rename.

    Note You must use Regedit instead of Regedt32 to rename this registry key.
    Rename it to an unused drive letter "\DosDevices\Z:".

    This frees up drive letter C.
    Find the drive letter you want changed. Look for "\DosDevices\D:".
    Right-click \DosDevices\D:, and then click Rename.
    Rename it to the appropriate (new) drive letter "\DosDevices\C:".
    Click the value for \DosDevices\Z:, click Rename, and then name it back to "\DosDevices\D:".
    ------------
    All I did was rename C to Z, then renamed D to C.  

    Reboot, and Windows will freak out for a bit that it is not a genuine copy.  I can't remember which link I clicked on, but it brought up a browser window, then reactivated itself in less than 5 minutes.  
    • Zaproponowany jako odpowiedź przez Sniffjack środa, 6 października 2010 04:30
    poniedziałek, 8 lutego 2010 04:40
  • I did the same thing as Neo13813.

    I installed a 2nd drive (multiple partitions). XP was on my original drive, no partition. I installed Win7 to the 2nd drive, 1st partition. (E:) I physically removed the drive that XP was on and had to use the Win7 cd to repair the missing NTLDR, no prob.

    I followed the instructions above and changed the E: to C:  My C: had the same address as my 7in1 card reader drives in the mounted list. I moved that to X:

    Now I'm stuck with the blank blue screen and message we've all talked about. I can get to task manager, but cannot run regedit or regedt32.

    Suggestions?

    wtorek, 16 marca 2010 15:35
  • Hey all

    Had the same problems after getting rid of xp from a dual boot setup and I am now at the same place as C_Cusick unable to run Regedit. Cannot find a solution to this any whrer on the net.

    Any Ideas?

     

    sobota, 8 maja 2010 13:26
  • "Mad Larkin" wrote in message news:76fbd1bc-3d18-4482-a5b2-348cc633457a...
    > Hey all
    >
    > Had the same problems after getting rid of xp from a dual boot setup and I
    > am now at the same place as C_Cusick unable to run Regedit. Cannot find a
    > solution to this any whrer on the net.
    >
    > Any Ideas?
    >
    >
    >
     
    Rather than tagging onto an old thread, it's far better to start a new one,
    and provide your own information - no two pc's are the same, and neither are
    their problems.
     
     
    --
    Noel Paton
    CrashFixPC
     
    Nil Carborundum Illegitemi
    www.crashfixpc.co.uk
     
     
    sobota, 8 maja 2010 19:33
    Moderator
  • This solution is absolutely correct for folks with the problem of reassigned drive letters after using GParted - with one important caveat!  It seems that after removing or resizing partitions Windows 7 assigns the remaining drive letter D: instead of C: which apparently monkeys things up.  After a few hours of painful troubleshooting and wondering why I couldn't successfully run regedit.exe or regedt32.exe I realized that in addition to following the steps above you must do them from safe mode!  This is key, since booting into the useless blue "build 7600" desktop would not give me the privileges I needed to run regedit.  Boot from safe mode, open task manager, and run regedit making sure to check the box to run it with elevated privileges and you're set!  Soooo glad I found this thread, thank you!!
    środa, 6 października 2010 04:40
  • My thanks to codehydro and jason-g. I did a partition shrink on a 750GB drive to 500, with about 380GB being used, using EaseUS Partition Magic, Home Edition (Free) after the Win7 Tool couldn't do it. I wanted to be able to image the drive to a 500GB as a backup. You guys saved the day. My boot drive was F, so I followed codehydro's instructions and after setting all the drives and rebooting, Windows came up activated as before.
    sobota, 7 kwietnia 2012 18:10
  • I know it is late in the game, but the regedit to mounted, do the export, delete all except the default at top, reboot, walla...

    Couldn't have been easier...as per instructions:
     

    • Navigate to  HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\MountedDevices
    • Right click on 'MountedDevices'
    • choose Export
    • Save to c:\
    • Select all the data inside on the right hand pane except the first one
    • Right click and choose Delete
    • Reboot

    I did not delete the key itself!  

    The data in the key will automatically regenerate.

    Many thanks, this saves on reinstall headaches big time...


    whatever

    niedziela, 18 listopada 2012 16:22
  • Thank you so much, just saved my computer by doing this!

    piątek, 15 listopada 2013 15:42
  • I just used this method to fix my Windows 7 Ultimate machine (8JAN15).  I had deleted a partition and expanded the Windows partition and upon reboot (first i had to fix the MBR...nothing is easy, eh?) got the blue screen that wouldn't do anything.  I followed Mr. Smith's instructions (albeit in safe mode and make sure the run as administrator box is checked...) and i am back in business.

    Thanks to Mr. Smith and Google!


    • Zmodyfikowany przez SweepMop czwartek, 8 stycznia 2015 18:06 rewording
    czwartek, 8 stycznia 2015 18:05
  • Worked great, now I can boot into my desktop again! Thanks for the help!
    środa, 8 kwietnia 2015 23:11
  • A variation of codehydro solution worked for me...

    My machine was originally configured to dual boot between Vista (original install) on C and Win7 Pro on E. I was performing a SSD drive migration but encountering a ton of issues restoring only the Win7 instance to the new drive. Since I hadn't used Vista in ages I decided to kill that first then clone the entire disk. Doing so solved those problems and I was able to boot the SSD drive into Win7. Being a SSD drive, space is a premium so I wanted to reclaim the Vista partition which is where my latest problem started. After doing so, rebooting generated the windows not genuine blue desktop.

    What I did to fix my issue:

    • I did NOT need to boot into safe mode. All apps I launched from the run prompt were already elevated (the run prompt stated this).
    • You can get to the run prompt from task manager through the menu; FILE - New Task. Task manager can be accessed from the useless blue desktop screen by doing CTRL+ALT+DELETE.
    • I used REGEDIT and deleted all the keys as originally suggested. This didn't solve my problem but also not sure if it played a role resolving the issue in the long run. Your choice.
    • Even though it didn't solve the problem after rebooting there were now less keys. I could see all the drive letters I had prior to the partition mod (I had an additional recovery partition I also re-purposed).
    • Since the issue seemed to be confusion over which drive was which I used DISKPART to see what it currently thought each drive letter was for.
      Open a command prompt (Task manager - File - New Task, type cmd) and then type DISKPART.
      Type SELECT DISK 0. Think this is the standard but may not be your configuration. If not sure you can type LIST DISK to see all disks and select yours.
      TYPE LIST VOLUME. This will show you the volumes on that disk with some additional details. The letters should correspond directly to those you see in REGEDIT. In my case the info column (far right) said that C was the boot volume where previously E was. Figured this was my issue.
    • I then followed the instructions above on renaming the keys in the registry. I changed E to F (since I didn't have an F, it could be anything) and then renamed C (what it thought was the boot volume) to E (which was the boot volume before).
    • I then closed everything and rebooted. Windows then started normally albeit a little slower the first time through.

    Even though this post started 5 1/2 years age it was a real time saver. I already spent way to much time trying to migrate to the SSD drive and truly thought i would have to step back and clone it again. Thanks to everyone that contributed!



    • Zmodyfikowany przez iSpyder wtorek, 14 kwietnia 2015 18:35
    wtorek, 14 kwietnia 2015 18:34
  • what iSpyder said, great post even after all this time.  Saved my sanity trying to transfer to SSD and deleting recover partition from a Dell PC.  Since I had the original harddisk, cloned it again and deleted the registry keys first.  Then shutdown system and used partition software make changes.  Used windows repair DVD and repaired boot (Dell puts bootmanager on the recovery partition)  and BOOM.   Boots fine, login fine no error no mess.

    THANKS!!!

    wtorek, 19 maja 2015 16:18