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Dell OEM Windows XP Professional Failed Windows Validation Test On A Dell Notebook Computer RRS feed

  • Frage

  • I have my client's old Dell Latitude D620 which he says came from the factory with Dell OEM Windows XP Pro preloaded on it; he bought it new, direct from Dell, though possibly through some sort of "company purchase plan" - it's been so long he couldn't remember for sure. He has had no problems with Windows updates or anything else since he has had it.  When I checked under My Computer / Properties it does indeed have a Dell logo and it is registered to him, showing Service Pack 3 installed.

    Yesterday I was doing some routine Windows updates when, after a few had downloaded, I suddenly got the dreaded "Windows Genuine Validation" crap and the fun began, with the message, "The product key used to activate Windows on your PC is not authorized for sale or use in the country or geographic area in which your are currently located".  Now since this thing originally came from either Austin or Round Rock, Texas straight to Fort Worth, Texas and has been working fine (updating both Windows XP Pro and Office 2003 Small Business Edition with no problems whatsoever for all these years) what in the Devil could suddenly make it fail validation now?  It's old as the hills and if it was going to have a problem with "validation" it surely would have long before now.  Oddly enough, all of the available updates seem to have downloaded & installed just fine, but I keep getting the Black Desktop & the nagging Windows Validation message.  I'm at my wit's end, especially since he's had this thing for years with nary a problem.  I'll attach a MGA Diagnostic Tool log to see if that sheds any light on it but I'm still mystified at why it would just suddenly pull this nonsense now, after updating fine for so many years.  Please advise ASAP, as he's expecting the computer back in a couple of days, in at least as good a working order as it was when he gave it to me...

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    Windows Validation Data-->
    Validation Status: Geographically blocked PID
    Validation Code: 13
    Cached Validation Code: N/A
    Windows Product Key: CM3HY-26VYW-6JRYC-X66GX-JVY2D
    Windows Product Key Hash: QlMc4eVzNRH58UjkaRc+5fkLfC8=
    Windows Product ID: 76487-640-1479176-23679
    Windows Product ID Type: 1
    Windows License Type: Volume
    Windows OS version: 5.1.2600.2.00010100.3.0.pro
    ID: {71F0BA63-2962-47CF-A6E4-655B9D73DA6F}(3)
    Is Admin: Yes
    TestCab: 0x0
    LegitcheckControl ActiveX: Registered, 1.9.42.0
    Signed By: Microsoft
    Product Name: N/A
    Architecture: N/A
    Build lab: N/A
    TTS Error: N/A
    Validation Diagnostic: 025D1FF3-230-1
    Resolution Status: N/A

    Vista WgaER Data-->
    ThreatID(s): N/A
    Version: N/A

    Windows XP Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: 13
    File Exists: Yes
    Version: 1.9.40.0
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: Microsoft
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: Microsoft

    OGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: 2.0.48.0
    OGAExec.exe Signed By: Microsoft
    OGAAddin.dll Signed By: Microsoft

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 100 Genuine
    Microsoft Office Small Business Edition 2003 - 120
    OGA Version: Registered, 2.0.48.0
    Signed By: Microsoft
    Office Diagnostics: 025D1FF3-230-1

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer\IEXPLORE.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Prompt
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Allowed
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{71F0BA63-2962-47CF-A6E4-655B9D73DA6F}</UGUID><Version>1.9.0027.0</Version><OS>5.1.2600.2.00010100.3.0.pro</OS><Architecture>x32</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-JVY2D</PKey><PID>76487-640-1479176-23679</PID><PIDType>1</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-3190309457-908087318-307978383</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>Dell Inc.</Manufacturer><Model>Latitude D620                   </Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>Dell Inc.</Manufacturer><Version>A10</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="4"/><Date>20080516000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>49EF3707018400FA</HWID><UserLCID>0409</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Central Standard Time(GMT-06:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>2</stat><msppid></msppid><name>Dell Latitude D620</name><model></model></SBID><OEM/><GANotification><File Name="WgaTray.exe" Version="1.9.40.0"/><File Name="WgaLogon.dll" Version="1.9.40.0"/><File Name="OGAAddin.dll" Version="2.0.48.0"/></GANotification></MachineData><Software><Office><Result>100</Result><Products><Product GUID="{91CA0409-6000-11D3-8CFE-0150048383C9}"><LegitResult>120</LegitResult><Name>Microsoft Office Small Business Edition 2003</Name><Ver>11</Ver><Val>B57131F72D6572A</Val><Hash>hiTNdvF1AvJX4XjzzJuOTvPK5EY=</Hash><Pid>70160-OEM-5691716-72163</Pid><PidType>6</PidType></Product></Products><Applications><App Id="16" Version="11" Result="100"/><App Id="18" Version="11" Result="100"/><App Id="19" Version="11" Result="100"/><App Id="1A" Version="11" Result="100"/><App Id="1B" Version="11" Result="100"/></Applications></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

    Licensing Data-->
    N/A

    Windows Activation Technologies-->
    N/A

    HWID Data-->
    N/A

    OEM Activation 1.0 Data-->
    BIOS string matches: yes
    Marker string from BIOS: 4000:Dell Inc|4000:Microsoft Corporation
    Marker string from OEMBIOS.DAT: N/A, hr = 0x80004005

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->
    N/A

    • Bearbeitet Travis_Lloyd Freitag, 28. September 2012 09:43 Technical correction
    Freitag, 28. September 2012 09:35

Antworten

  • As I said before- the installed version is NOT one that would ever have been shipped from Dell (and certainly not in the US)

    You could try running Speccy on it and see what it gives as the installation date - that would at least tell you when it was given an improper 'upgrade'

    As to why it suddenly went non-genuine, I suspect that the actual Key's owner discovered that it had been abused, and requested MS to apply the GeoBlock so as to limit the problem, rather than having to change Keys on all their own machines.

    There's also the possibility that someone applied a hack to circumvent proper activation/validation and this hack was removed by either an AV, or by an update, which allowed proper procesing and the discovery of the problem.

    As for what to do now - Options are....

    1) Get a set of proper Dell Recovery disks for the machine, and use them to reformat/reinstall - this will place the proper licenses in the OS to allow self-activation of the OEM_SLP Key embedded in the disk.

    2) run the gauntlet of counterfeits in eBay and suchlike and hope you get lucky buying either an OEM or Full Retail (legitimate) copy of XP Pro, and use the PKUT to change the Key.

    3) replace the machine or purchase a Full Retail copy of Windows 7 and clean install

    XP is still supported - at least until 2014 - but only for Security updates.

    Win7 will be supported until 2019 (Vista until Jan 2017).

    If the current machine has sufficient RAM (2GB)  and storage (100GB) available, there's probably no reason not to upgrade to Win7 - but like you, I would suggest a new machine as being the more cost-effective.

    HTH?


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    Freitag, 28. September 2012 11:52
    Moderator
  • I see I missed on of your queries - how could this key have been applied, while still retaining the aspects of a Dell install?

    If we assum that the machine originally shipped with Windows XP Home installed, then using Voluem media to do an Upgrade install would leave everything else as it was, while giving the machine its new OS.

    Likewise, a repair install of Pro using Volume media would have the same effect.

    You could see if there are any tell-tales in the Windows folder - it's so long since I looked, I can't remember what they are now :(


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    Freitag, 28. September 2012 12:01
    Moderator

Alle Antworten

  • The installation here is NOT one that shipped from the factory - it's a GeoBlocked Volume License Key.

    For which version and edition of Windows is the machine licensed, according to teh COA sticker on the case?

    If it's for Windows XP Pro, try using the Product Key Update Tool to change the Key http://windows.microsoft.com/en-GB/windows/help/genuine/product-key , then reboot and  post a new MGADiag report so we can confirm that everything went OK

    If it's for anything else (and given that the BIOS date is 2008, it could easily be Vista), then you will have to reformat and reinstall using the manufacturer's Recovery media, or appropriate other disk.


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    Freitag, 28. September 2012 10:43
    Moderator
  • He is not a very sophisticated user, totally incapable of doing an install on his own, plus he said it's never had anything but Windows XP Pro on it since he took it out of the box; I can almost guarantee it NEVER had Vista on it; it's just too old.  He almost couldn't cope with Vista Business on his "new" desktop. He did work at a law firm which had their own in-house IT guy but he says as far as he knows nobody re-installed his operating system.  All he knows is he bought it brand new from Dell & he has not had any problem with updtates on it ever, up to now.  I have been servicing it for almost 2 years now & I have never had a problem, either.  Why would this show-up just now, given that long history of no problems?  Also, do you agree that this is indeed a Dell OEM version of XP Pro?  As I said, it has the Dell logo when you look at the My Computer / Properties page, and it is duly registered in his name.  As for the COA sticker, this notebook has been through the mill; it's so old & beat-up that there are just a few fragments of the sticker left on the bottom (Hell, the memory cover door has even vanished); the sticker was worn-off long ago.  I would like to know, as much as possible, the "history" of what is on there; where or who did it come from & why is it (apparently suddenly) blocked?  And why does it say that claptrap about the geographical location?  I find it hard to believe that this particular version was made for China, Russia or Western Europe...  Plus, the OEM Office 2003 suite which came on there at the same time is apparently okay; how do you explain that?

    Given the fact that the stupid COA sticker is effectively gone, where could he obtain another Product Key?

    I still find it exceedingly curious as to why it has worked for literally years, now (considering he has never, to my knowledge, avoided downloading the WGA update or whatever; he would not know how to avoid it, in any case).

    So, where does he go from here?  I mean, XP is a dinosaur anyway which is fixing to drop off the radar screen any minute, if it has not essentially done so already.  I think Microsoft would do much better worrying about Vista, Windows 7 & soon-to-be Windows 8 than didling around with (what my client believes to be a legitimate copy of) an over-a-decade-old operating system.

    Thanks, & standing by...


    • Bearbeitet Travis_Lloyd Freitag, 28. September 2012 11:20 Corrected a typo
    Freitag, 28. September 2012 11:17
  • As I said before- the installed version is NOT one that would ever have been shipped from Dell (and certainly not in the US)

    You could try running Speccy on it and see what it gives as the installation date - that would at least tell you when it was given an improper 'upgrade'

    As to why it suddenly went non-genuine, I suspect that the actual Key's owner discovered that it had been abused, and requested MS to apply the GeoBlock so as to limit the problem, rather than having to change Keys on all their own machines.

    There's also the possibility that someone applied a hack to circumvent proper activation/validation and this hack was removed by either an AV, or by an update, which allowed proper procesing and the discovery of the problem.

    As for what to do now - Options are....

    1) Get a set of proper Dell Recovery disks for the machine, and use them to reformat/reinstall - this will place the proper licenses in the OS to allow self-activation of the OEM_SLP Key embedded in the disk.

    2) run the gauntlet of counterfeits in eBay and suchlike and hope you get lucky buying either an OEM or Full Retail (legitimate) copy of XP Pro, and use the PKUT to change the Key.

    3) replace the machine or purchase a Full Retail copy of Windows 7 and clean install

    XP is still supported - at least until 2014 - but only for Security updates.

    Win7 will be supported until 2019 (Vista until Jan 2017).

    If the current machine has sufficient RAM (2GB)  and storage (100GB) available, there's probably no reason not to upgrade to Win7 - but like you, I would suggest a new machine as being the more cost-effective.

    HTH?


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    Freitag, 28. September 2012 11:52
    Moderator
  • I see I missed on of your queries - how could this key have been applied, while still retaining the aspects of a Dell install?

    If we assum that the machine originally shipped with Windows XP Home installed, then using Voluem media to do an Upgrade install would leave everything else as it was, while giving the machine its new OS.

    Likewise, a repair install of Pro using Volume media would have the same effect.

    You could see if there are any tell-tales in the Windows folder - it's so long since I looked, I can't remember what they are now :(


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    Freitag, 28. September 2012 12:01
    Moderator
  • Well, whaddaya know?  Everything is now "mysteriously" okay, after the least little Product Key tweak thanks to some very valuable assistance from Dell Tech Support.  My client still swears that nobody upgraded the OS without his knowledge and also still thinks it was some kind of Microsoft ripoff, since he went for so many years without this problem suddenly manifesting itself out of the Blue like it did but I guess it's a moot point now, anyway.  As a lawyer, he is totally opposed to any sort of pirated software and says he has never, to his knowledge, had such on any of his computers.

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    Windows Validation Data-->
    Validation Status: Genuine
    Validation Code: 0
    Cached Validation Code: N/A
    Windows Product Key: <redacted>-PXTRG-26HGF-MMGKT
    Windows Product Key Hash: UjZIBpWPe/Fz5QsxVbqPQlKqvwk=
    Windows Product ID: 76487-OEM-2241964-50778
    Windows Product ID Type: 3
    Windows License Type: OEM System Builder
    Windows OS version: 5.1.2600.2.00010100.3.0.pro
    ID: {71F0BA63-2962-47CF-A6E4-655B9D73DA6F}(3)
    Is Admin: Yes
    TestCab: 0x0
    LegitcheckControl ActiveX: Registered, 1.9.42.0
    Signed By: Microsoft
    Product Name: N/A
    Architecture: N/A
    Build lab: N/A
    TTS Error: N/A
    Validation Diagnostic: 025D1FF3-230-1
    Resolution Status: N/A

    Vista WgaER Data-->
    ThreatID(s): N/A
    Version: N/A

    Windows XP Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: 0
    File Exists: Yes
    Version: 1.9.40.0
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: Microsoft
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: Microsoft

    OGA Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Version: 2.0.48.0
    OGAExec.exe Signed By: Microsoft
    OGAAddin.dll Signed By: Microsoft

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 100 Genuine
    Microsoft Office Small Business Edition 2003 - 119 Cryptographics Error
    OGA Version: Registered, 2.0.48.0
    Signed By: Microsoft
    Office Diagnostics: 025D1FF3-230-1

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: N/A
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer\IEXPLORE.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Prompt
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Allowed
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{71F0BA63-2962-47CF-A6E4-655B9D73DA6F}</UGUID><Version>1.9.0027.0</Version><OS>5.1.2600.2.00010100.3.0.pro</OS><Architecture>x32</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-MMGKT</PKey><PID>76487-OEM-2241964-50778</PID><PIDType>3</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-3190309457-908087318-307978383</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>Dell Inc.</Manufacturer><Model>Latitude D620                   </Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>Dell Inc.</Manufacturer><Version>A10</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="4"/><Date>20080516000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>49EF3707018400FA</HWID><UserLCID>0409</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Central Standard Time(GMT-06:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>2</stat><msppid></msppid><name>Dell Latitude D620</name><model></model></SBID><OEM/><GANotification><File Name="WgaTray.exe" Version="1.9.40.0"/><File Name="WgaLogon.dll" Version="1.9.40.0"/><File Name="OGAAddin.dll" Version="2.0.48.0"/></GANotification></MachineData><Software><Office><Result>100</Result><Products><Product GUID="{91CA0409-6000-11D3-8CFE-0150048383C9}"><LegitResult>119</LegitResult><Name>Microsoft Office Small Business Edition 2003</Name><Ver>11</Ver><Val>B57131F72D6572A</Val><Hash>hiTNdvF1AvJX4XjzzJuOTvPK5EY=</Hash><Pid>70160-OEM-5691716-72163</Pid><PidType>6</PidType></Product></Products><Applications><App Id="16" Version="11" Result="100"/><App Id="18" Version="11" Result="100"/><App Id="19" Version="11" Result="100"/><App Id="1A" Version="11" Result="100"/><App Id="1B" Version="11" Result="100"/></Applications></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

    Licensing Data-->
    N/A

    Windows Activation Technologies-->
    N/A

    HWID Data-->
    N/A

    OEM Activation 1.0 Data-->
    BIOS string matches: yes
    Marker string from BIOS: 4000:Dell Inc|4000:Microsoft Corporation
    Marker string from OEMBIOS.DAT: N/A, hr = 0x80004005

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->
    N/A


    • Bearbeitet Noel D PatonEditor Sonntag, 7. Oktober 2012 10:24 remove parts of Product Key
    Sonntag, 7. Oktober 2012 07:59
  • Completely changing the Key is not a 'least little tweak'!

    The current Key is an OEM System Builder Key - which is unlikely to have come from Dell, either.

    There is a major problem somewhere - becasue your full Key is showing in the report, and there is no way that should happen. (I've redacted the bits that should not be there)

    There is a problem with the Office licensing now, which was not present before - you may need to address that in the Office Answers forums, or by uninstalling and reinstalling it.

    Whatever, at least your system appears to be passing now - what happens if you use Internet Explorer to validate at www.microsoft.com/genuine/validate ?


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    Sonntag, 7. Oktober 2012 10:24
    Moderator
  • There is a major problem somewhere - becasue your full Key is showing in the report, and there is no way that should happen. (I've redacted the bits that should not be there)


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    Agree, I have never seen the mgadiag utility spit out a full product key.

    But then, the utility's output is just a text file and easily edited.

    The crypto error in the Office section does seem to point to some sort of foul play, either intentional or not.

    If the OP is still reading, it's very easy to add the Dell logo to the system properties dialog box.  When doing a Dell XP computer from bare metal I use the first four downloads here to make the computer look as "unmolested" as possible:  http://www.bay-wolf.com/downloads.htm

    Donnerstag, 11. Oktober 2012 15:58
  • If you are like me and have a licence key , but you don't know what type it is (retail, OEM. Volume etc)

    Then i used this great app that can tell you what Type your licence key  is and the vendor that issued it (Dell, samsung, HP etc)

    go here 

    The Ultimate PID Checker  

    http://janek2012.eu/ultimate-pid-checker/

    Download ir (RAR)

    use 7zip (Free download to unpack it)


    It runs without Installing (portable)


    For me I confirmed it was an OEM licence -- Dell --- so run Any Dell OEM disk to repair (Same OS disk)


    Mittwoch, 16. Juli 2014 10:28
  • I would be VERY careful about using such tools - they are a great way of harvesting Keys for resale.

    The Product ID tells you whether the Key is an OEM one or not - and a quick Google search of the internet using just the last three groups of characters of the Key will make it obvious whether it's likely to be a blocked Key or not. If a Key is OEM and Blocked, the chances are that it's an OEM_SLP Key, which is blocked from activation at the MS servers because it's designed to self-activate on your computer at every boot.

    All retail Keys require activation at the MS servers - except those which have been blocked either because they are Default Keys, or because of abuse.

    KMS Keys are all blocked from activation at the MS server

    MAK Volume Keys - again, a quick search of the internet will find if its been blocked


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi
    CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    No - I do not work for Microsoft, or any of its contractors.

    Mittwoch, 16. Juli 2014 14:45
    Moderator